4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Why are you crossing?

Year two of living on the ocean — getting her Baja on!

La ultima cerveza — the last beer
La ultima cerveza — the last beer

Post Title: My new project: Faces of the Line. The birth of an idea.

Post Date: August 30, 2014

I’ve started a new page on Facebook. It’s called Caras de la Linea, or Faces of the Line. I feel that the general public has a preconceived notion of who is crossing the U.S. and Mexican border every day. I hope to show the diverse wave of humans that pass through this gate/fence one by one every day at the average rate of 50,000 people every 24 hours.

I plan on giving out little cards to each person in line, starting at the end and working my way to the front, explaining my project. Then if they would like to participate they can sign the card and I will shoot a photo!

I will get their name and country. I want to ask five questions... Why are you crossing? What’s the longest you’ve stood in line? What is the one thing you never leave for the line without? Would your life change drastically for the best if the border was more efficient? If you could change something in your life what would it be?

Post Title: Still here.

Post Date: August 25, 2014

In a few days, I will have lived in Playas de Tijuana for two years. There have been barren, deserted moments and unfolding, enlightening sunsets along the way. So I thought I would compile some of my favorite things, in no special order: 1. Frequent, inexpensive public transportation with live music. 2. Street food vendors. 3. Water delivered to your door with fresh fruit and other goodies. 4. Affordable utilities. 5. Sobre Rueda (Swap meet/ farmers’ market).

Also, some things I could do without: 1. Homeless dogs. 2. Getting gringo prices. 3. Trash/dog poo.

So here’s to another year south of the border! Living on the ocean, getting my Baja on!

Post Title: Dia de los Muertos 2012

Post Date: lunes, 5 de noviembre de 2012

Took a multi-taxi to town, where I found a few tucked-away markets with eager vendors and Day of the Dead (or Dia De Los Muertos) decor galore!

Dia de los Muertos is a national holiday, so the market was full of leisurely shoppers and families picking out items to take to the cemetery for decorating the tombs of loved ones passed.

Marigolds, or Cempasuchils, are laid out; in small villages, a pathway will lead from the cemetery to the altar in the families’ homes, so that the dead can smell their way back home to the physical plane. The dead are offered Pan de muerto, a special bread made for the occasion, along with water and salt to nourish and purify along the journey. Favorites of the deceased will be added as well, possibly a favorite spirit from the material world, such as tequila or the popular Mexican Buchanan’s Whiskey. You might also find a photograph, a favorite toy for children, sugar skulls (or calaveras), personal belongings, candles, and incense.

This celebration of the dead has roots that reach as far back as the Aztecs, and it is steeped in Catholicism as well. On October 31, All Hallows Eve, the children make a children’s altar to invite the angelitos (spirits of dead children) to come back for a visit. November 1st, considered All Saints Day in Mexico, is known as “Día de los Inocentes” (Day of the Innocents). It honors children and infants passed. On November 2, the adult spirits will come to visit. November 2 is All Souls Day, Dia De Los Muertos. This three-day celebration is a time for families and friends to share stories, traditional foods, and camaraderie with one another and their ancestors.

As the sun was setting in the sky, I set out to explore the cemetery.... The afternoon light reflected off the marble, and the angels seemed to be smiling. Families were [on] their way to the graves of their ancestors, with buckets in hand to clean the headstones, and with all the makings of their ofrendas.

The roving mariachis were playing sad songs of days gone by. Children rolled around in the grass, and the spirits were rejoicing, I’m sure! It was the perfect way to end my day: reflecting on my own ancestors and those I love who have passed before me.

Title: La Sirena | Address: lasirenasightseeing.blogspot.mx

Author: Sirena Sisco | From: Tijuana | Blogging since: 2012

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

City officials beg courts to declare Measure C passed so that Convention Center can expand services to migrant minors.

Court Packing ‘Em In
Next Article

Crazies at Moonlight Beach, tyrants of San Diego lifeguards, lover of the Mission Beach plunge

Most exclusive skin diving club in the world, Tom Wolfe despised at Windansea, I watched them dredge Mission Bay in 1949
La ultima cerveza — the last beer
La ultima cerveza — the last beer

Post Title: My new project: Faces of the Line. The birth of an idea.

Post Date: August 30, 2014

I’ve started a new page on Facebook. It’s called Caras de la Linea, or Faces of the Line. I feel that the general public has a preconceived notion of who is crossing the U.S. and Mexican border every day. I hope to show the diverse wave of humans that pass through this gate/fence one by one every day at the average rate of 50,000 people every 24 hours.

I plan on giving out little cards to each person in line, starting at the end and working my way to the front, explaining my project. Then if they would like to participate they can sign the card and I will shoot a photo!

I will get their name and country. I want to ask five questions... Why are you crossing? What’s the longest you’ve stood in line? What is the one thing you never leave for the line without? Would your life change drastically for the best if the border was more efficient? If you could change something in your life what would it be?

Post Title: Still here.

Post Date: August 25, 2014

In a few days, I will have lived in Playas de Tijuana for two years. There have been barren, deserted moments and unfolding, enlightening sunsets along the way. So I thought I would compile some of my favorite things, in no special order: 1. Frequent, inexpensive public transportation with live music. 2. Street food vendors. 3. Water delivered to your door with fresh fruit and other goodies. 4. Affordable utilities. 5. Sobre Rueda (Swap meet/ farmers’ market).

Also, some things I could do without: 1. Homeless dogs. 2. Getting gringo prices. 3. Trash/dog poo.

So here’s to another year south of the border! Living on the ocean, getting my Baja on!

Post Title: Dia de los Muertos 2012

Post Date: lunes, 5 de noviembre de 2012

Took a multi-taxi to town, where I found a few tucked-away markets with eager vendors and Day of the Dead (or Dia De Los Muertos) decor galore!

Dia de los Muertos is a national holiday, so the market was full of leisurely shoppers and families picking out items to take to the cemetery for decorating the tombs of loved ones passed.

Marigolds, or Cempasuchils, are laid out; in small villages, a pathway will lead from the cemetery to the altar in the families’ homes, so that the dead can smell their way back home to the physical plane. The dead are offered Pan de muerto, a special bread made for the occasion, along with water and salt to nourish and purify along the journey. Favorites of the deceased will be added as well, possibly a favorite spirit from the material world, such as tequila or the popular Mexican Buchanan’s Whiskey. You might also find a photograph, a favorite toy for children, sugar skulls (or calaveras), personal belongings, candles, and incense.

This celebration of the dead has roots that reach as far back as the Aztecs, and it is steeped in Catholicism as well. On October 31, All Hallows Eve, the children make a children’s altar to invite the angelitos (spirits of dead children) to come back for a visit. November 1st, considered All Saints Day in Mexico, is known as “Día de los Inocentes” (Day of the Innocents). It honors children and infants passed. On November 2, the adult spirits will come to visit. November 2 is All Souls Day, Dia De Los Muertos. This three-day celebration is a time for families and friends to share stories, traditional foods, and camaraderie with one another and their ancestors.

As the sun was setting in the sky, I set out to explore the cemetery.... The afternoon light reflected off the marble, and the angels seemed to be smiling. Families were [on] their way to the graves of their ancestors, with buckets in hand to clean the headstones, and with all the makings of their ofrendas.

The roving mariachis were playing sad songs of days gone by. Children rolled around in the grass, and the spirits were rejoicing, I’m sure! It was the perfect way to end my day: reflecting on my own ancestors and those I love who have passed before me.

Title: La Sirena | Address: lasirenasightseeing.blogspot.mx

Author: Sirena Sisco | From: Tijuana | Blogging since: 2012

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Disclosure-shy developers draw hand-slap ethics fine

Three-day filing deadlines stretched three weeks by pro-tax housing campaign
Next Article

Rifkin’s Festival riffs on the greats

Former film professor Rifkin does his best work on his back sound asleep, dreaming in black-and-white
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close