4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Broadway bayside blighted, Manchester lawyers say

U-T San Diego publisher wants judge to throw out state's case against project.

Proposed Navy Broadway Complex
Proposed Navy Broadway Complex

The way lawyers for Douglas Manchester see it, the Republican developer and U-T San Diego publisher is doing San Diegans a big favor with his controversial, mega-million dollar Navy Broadway bayside development deal.

"The Navy Broadway Complex is arguably the most blighted urban waterfront property in California," they write in a March 7 federal court filing. "The site contains dilapidated warehouse and office space built between 1921 and 1944, and consists mostly of parking lots."

"The entire site is fenced off and completely restricts public access and views from downtown to the waterfront."

Coming to the rescue, his attorneys say, is Manchester.

"This Project will transform the [site] into a welcoming waterfront mixed-use development with hotel, office, restaurant, entertainment, retail, and cultural attraction uses, a 1.9 acre public park, and about 2.4 acres of additional public open space.

"Thus, in addition to providing the Navy necessary new offices, the Project will significantly improve public access and views to the waterfront.”

Not much has been heard lately in local media about Manchester's ongoing legal battle with the state Coastal Commission over his lucrative deal with the Navy to commercialize the downtown waterfront, in large part, city hall observers say, because the newspaper owner appears to want it that way.

The privatization project managed to fly largely under the radar during the recently concluded mayor's race, won by GOP city councilman Kevin Faulconer, a Navy Broadway proponent backed by Manchester both editorially as well as with $356,000 in campaign contributions made to state and county Republican committees and the GOP Lincoln Club.

The latter's hit pieces are widely seen as having a major role in the destruction of the political hopes of Faulconer's Democratic rivals, Nathan Fletcher and David Alvarez.

But despite his paper's seemingly convenient silence, a corps of attorneys for his real estate project has been battling before a federal judge over allegations that he and the Navy are trying to foist a massively overgrown commercial deal on the city in violation of state and federal law.

In a lawsuit filed in January of last year against Manchester and the U.S. Navy, the state charged that a report prepared by the Navy in 1990 was out of date and failed to reflect numerous negative changes Manchester has made to his plans during the decades since then.

The project as described in the Navy’s 1990 [report] was never built.

More than 15 years later, the Navy signed a lease with Manchester to redevelop the site, and the Navy and Manchester proposed many changes to the project.

The Navy and Manchester proposed to build 7 towers (apparently three for hotel use, three for office use, and one for a mix of office and hotel use), and it allocated substantially less space for public use and recreation on the waterfront side of the site.

The Navy and Manchester moved the maritime history museum (from its waterfront location next to a park) to an inland location, reduced the size of the museum from 55,000 to 40,000 square feet, and replaced it on the waterfront with a 13-story, 296,535 square foot commercial office building.

In addition, the Coastal Commission suit says, "since 9/11 there are additional anti-terrorism requirements for federal buildings, yet the Navy has declined to analyze or discuss...whether its building will meet those requirements.

"The Navy also has declined to analyze or discuss alternative locations to other naval bases in the San Diego."

In response, Manchester's lawyers argue that the Navy doesn't have enough money to build new offices by itself, and thus the well-heeled developer is doing the cash-strapped federal government a favor by bankrolling the so-called public-private venture by linking it to his necessarily huge commercial development.

"The Navy needs new office space at the [Navy Broadway location], but lacks funding necessary to redevelop the site."

Questioning the Coastal Commission's jurisdiction over federal projects and citing the federal statute of limitations, among other cited points and authorities, Manchester's legal team is asking U.S. Judge Jeffrey Miller to throw the state's case out of court.

Oral arguments have been set for May 12.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Greensky Bluegrass 20th Anniversary, Sam Smith Livestream from Abbey Road, Full Moon Halloween Hike

Events October 29-October 31, 2020
Next Article

Beating back fear of Tijuana, why I keep thinking about Mexico, a cross-border kidnapping

The normalcy of smuggling across the line, party people re-take TJ, deported but not angry
Proposed Navy Broadway Complex
Proposed Navy Broadway Complex

The way lawyers for Douglas Manchester see it, the Republican developer and U-T San Diego publisher is doing San Diegans a big favor with his controversial, mega-million dollar Navy Broadway bayside development deal.

"The Navy Broadway Complex is arguably the most blighted urban waterfront property in California," they write in a March 7 federal court filing. "The site contains dilapidated warehouse and office space built between 1921 and 1944, and consists mostly of parking lots."

"The entire site is fenced off and completely restricts public access and views from downtown to the waterfront."

Coming to the rescue, his attorneys say, is Manchester.

"This Project will transform the [site] into a welcoming waterfront mixed-use development with hotel, office, restaurant, entertainment, retail, and cultural attraction uses, a 1.9 acre public park, and about 2.4 acres of additional public open space.

"Thus, in addition to providing the Navy necessary new offices, the Project will significantly improve public access and views to the waterfront.”

Not much has been heard lately in local media about Manchester's ongoing legal battle with the state Coastal Commission over his lucrative deal with the Navy to commercialize the downtown waterfront, in large part, city hall observers say, because the newspaper owner appears to want it that way.

The privatization project managed to fly largely under the radar during the recently concluded mayor's race, won by GOP city councilman Kevin Faulconer, a Navy Broadway proponent backed by Manchester both editorially as well as with $356,000 in campaign contributions made to state and county Republican committees and the GOP Lincoln Club.

The latter's hit pieces are widely seen as having a major role in the destruction of the political hopes of Faulconer's Democratic rivals, Nathan Fletcher and David Alvarez.

But despite his paper's seemingly convenient silence, a corps of attorneys for his real estate project has been battling before a federal judge over allegations that he and the Navy are trying to foist a massively overgrown commercial deal on the city in violation of state and federal law.

In a lawsuit filed in January of last year against Manchester and the U.S. Navy, the state charged that a report prepared by the Navy in 1990 was out of date and failed to reflect numerous negative changes Manchester has made to his plans during the decades since then.

The project as described in the Navy’s 1990 [report] was never built.

More than 15 years later, the Navy signed a lease with Manchester to redevelop the site, and the Navy and Manchester proposed many changes to the project.

The Navy and Manchester proposed to build 7 towers (apparently three for hotel use, three for office use, and one for a mix of office and hotel use), and it allocated substantially less space for public use and recreation on the waterfront side of the site.

The Navy and Manchester moved the maritime history museum (from its waterfront location next to a park) to an inland location, reduced the size of the museum from 55,000 to 40,000 square feet, and replaced it on the waterfront with a 13-story, 296,535 square foot commercial office building.

In addition, the Coastal Commission suit says, "since 9/11 there are additional anti-terrorism requirements for federal buildings, yet the Navy has declined to analyze or discuss...whether its building will meet those requirements.

"The Navy also has declined to analyze or discuss alternative locations to other naval bases in the San Diego."

In response, Manchester's lawyers argue that the Navy doesn't have enough money to build new offices by itself, and thus the well-heeled developer is doing the cash-strapped federal government a favor by bankrolling the so-called public-private venture by linking it to his necessarily huge commercial development.

"The Navy needs new office space at the [Navy Broadway location], but lacks funding necessary to redevelop the site."

Questioning the Coastal Commission's jurisdiction over federal projects and citing the federal statute of limitations, among other cited points and authorities, Manchester's legal team is asking U.S. Judge Jeffrey Miller to throw the state's case out of court.

Oral arguments have been set for May 12.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

The “radical inclusiveness” of an openly LBGTQ+ pastor

To embrace the reality that faith is about action
Next Article

How Otay changed, secret TJ gardens, Mission Valley's future

San Diego State's Paseo project, building a Rancho Santa Fe mansion, downtown high rises never stop
Comments
11

Will Manchester and his minions declare the U-T property site to be "blighted" too, in order to fast-track his planned megalopolis there?

March 21, 2014

Wasn't downtown Coronado declared blighted a few years back so they could use redevelopment funds? Curious how that works.

March 21, 2014

That sort of civic misbehavior is one of the reasons why state-funded redevelopment was shut down by Gov. Brown.

March 22, 2014

Wow, that photo is looking great!!! Especially compaired to the area now. Can't understand why this Manchester guy gets hated on so much. He has created a lot of jobs and brought a ton of tax and other money in from his hotels and other businesses. Yeah, he makes money too but how is that bad when jobs and tax revenue for this city are created?? Just means more city workers will be able to retire at 50!!!...LOL!!!

March 21, 2014

(1) It's not a "photo"; it's a design concept. (2) Manchester ran a non-union hotel when he owned the Manchester Grand Hyatt, to scrimp on wages and benefits for his hardworking employees. (3) His dwindling U-T has eliminated jobs, NOT hired more people. The old "job creator" nonsense is once again exposed for what it really is.

March 21, 2014

1) so what, it still looks better especially compaired to the area now. 2) Taxes pay for the city workers pensions, my point. The jobs that are created are created based on running a business. The employees can decide where they want to work. Without him there wouldn't be jobs, so the rest is mute. 3) I thought the argument was that the "newspaper is dead"? That means you'll hire more??? The fact that people still work there based on that is a credit to him. "Nonsense" is the fact that without this guy there would be more, better jobs.

March 25, 2014

Architectural renderings can look "great" but a final, approved project may not look the same. In any case, Manchester's Navy Broadway Complex won't be built for years, and possibly never.

March 25, 2014

If it's a Manchester building it will look "GREAT"...they all do!!! In any case, I hope you are wrong about the timeline or even the success of the project. That will mean a lot less revenue for the city, builders, workers and the people of San Diego in general. Never a good thing, especially in this economy.

March 28, 2014

Manchester has created a lot of low wage no benefit/low benefit jobs. He is just another example of the mega rich who never share with their employees the success he has while cost shifting health care, housing, food, etc to the taxpayers

March 22, 2014

What? there are a lot of folks making a lot of money in his businesses. So, if he wasn't there things would be better? Why not give an example of the hotel industry business that doesn't do what you are against? All health care is being affected in negitive ways with costs shifting. Not Manchester's fault. He controls housing prices??...LOL! He does bring a lot of tax revenue into the SD tourist industry that helps many, many folks in all of San Diego.

March 25, 2014

Privatization could the new entry in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV, under Section 304 (Dependence). San Diego is touted to be the new Republican model, based on Faulconer's triumph, courtesy of Manchester et al. Nausea, worse than I can describe.

Can't wait to attend EDGE 2015. What?

March 21, 2014

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close