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“Unforgettable” Outtakes

Vignettes from San Diego history: Oceanside and Carlsbad.

Herbert Crouch and wife
Herbert Crouch and wife

From the Carlsbad Plain Truth (editor William Webster Borden, whose slogan was “Independent but not neutral”):

“Charles Kelly has a remarkable hen. She disappeared on Dec. 25, 1886, leaving a brood of young chickens behind her. It was supposed that none but some hungry coyote could tell of where she had gone. But day before yesterday, just one month from the time of her disappearance, she surprised her owners by coming home again. If those coyotes had not wickedly killed and carried away 17 other chickens for him on that same unfortunate day, Charlie would ask the poor coyote’s pardon for having wrongly accused him.” - September 23, 1886

“The word ‘kid’ is fast becoming an accepted word. The other day a parrot called out ‘Hello! Hello, kid!’ The dictionaries will perhaps be the next to adopt the slang term.” – April 1, 1891.


From the Carlsbad Spirit of Love:

“A law passed in county requiring all travelers to have lights on their vehicles.” – October, 1911.

“Six airship passes in ten days in January! Pretty soon we won’t get out of bed to see one.” – January, 1914.


From the Oceanside Blade:

Archibald “Arch” Freeman was a constable at Oceanside in the mid-1880s. In 1895 the Blade described him as “one of the old time characters of this region.” He had “sandy hair, red beard, blue overalls, one eye in a bandage, and a face terribly pitted from smallpox." When he brought a prisoner from Fallbrook, one of the citizenry confused the two, since Freeman was “one of the hardest looking characters he ever saw.” The Blade came to Freeman’s defense: “It may be all true that he presents a rough exterior, is uncouth of manners and more or less typical of the ‘Wild and Woolly,’ but, while brave as a lion, it is said by those who know, that there is not a breast in all the California’s in which beats a heart more tender and kind than Arch Freeman’s.”


Herbert Crouch came to San Diego in 1869. For years he wrote letters to the editor correcting historical mistakes. In 1920 he had words for recent arrivals: “Well, we old settlers did not go around talking bonds, eating barbequed beef and roast chicken, and singing songs, but lived on hog and hominy, laid out the roads and built them ourselves, and opened the way for the newcomers.”


Charles Wesley Orton, Carlsbad: A New Unabashed History:

“One of the more vulpine of the railroad magnates was California’s own C.P. Huntington, of whom the nicest thing said was that he had never been known to steal a red-hot stove.”

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Herbert Crouch and wife
Herbert Crouch and wife

From the Carlsbad Plain Truth (editor William Webster Borden, whose slogan was “Independent but not neutral”):

“Charles Kelly has a remarkable hen. She disappeared on Dec. 25, 1886, leaving a brood of young chickens behind her. It was supposed that none but some hungry coyote could tell of where she had gone. But day before yesterday, just one month from the time of her disappearance, she surprised her owners by coming home again. If those coyotes had not wickedly killed and carried away 17 other chickens for him on that same unfortunate day, Charlie would ask the poor coyote’s pardon for having wrongly accused him.” - September 23, 1886

“The word ‘kid’ is fast becoming an accepted word. The other day a parrot called out ‘Hello! Hello, kid!’ The dictionaries will perhaps be the next to adopt the slang term.” – April 1, 1891.


From the Carlsbad Spirit of Love:

“A law passed in county requiring all travelers to have lights on their vehicles.” – October, 1911.

“Six airship passes in ten days in January! Pretty soon we won’t get out of bed to see one.” – January, 1914.


From the Oceanside Blade:

Archibald “Arch” Freeman was a constable at Oceanside in the mid-1880s. In 1895 the Blade described him as “one of the old time characters of this region.” He had “sandy hair, red beard, blue overalls, one eye in a bandage, and a face terribly pitted from smallpox." When he brought a prisoner from Fallbrook, one of the citizenry confused the two, since Freeman was “one of the hardest looking characters he ever saw.” The Blade came to Freeman’s defense: “It may be all true that he presents a rough exterior, is uncouth of manners and more or less typical of the ‘Wild and Woolly,’ but, while brave as a lion, it is said by those who know, that there is not a breast in all the California’s in which beats a heart more tender and kind than Arch Freeman’s.”


Herbert Crouch came to San Diego in 1869. For years he wrote letters to the editor correcting historical mistakes. In 1920 he had words for recent arrivals: “Well, we old settlers did not go around talking bonds, eating barbequed beef and roast chicken, and singing songs, but lived on hog and hominy, laid out the roads and built them ourselves, and opened the way for the newcomers.”


Charles Wesley Orton, Carlsbad: A New Unabashed History:

“One of the more vulpine of the railroad magnates was California’s own C.P. Huntington, of whom the nicest thing said was that he had never been known to steal a red-hot stove.”

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Comments
4

Just makes one love the English language, and those that write it!

July 29, 2014

Interesting article here Jeff. Maybe a regular column addition to The Reader? "Goofy stuff old folks said way back when." It's really a shame the historic newspaper names no longer exist, like the Oceanside Blade, Carlsbad Journal, Encinitas Coast Dispatch, and the Vista Press. More importantly, where are the archives and photos? I was the recipient of two boxes of old Coast Dispatch photos, but there are many many more, I assume now lost forever.

July 29, 2014

These old news excerpts WOULD make a great weekly column! Fun to look back at a world where "airships" were becoming so common as to annoy, and the word "kid" was a brand new slang term --

July 29, 2014

Sorry I'm late in getting back. Not a regular column - local theater around here's become Snowsnado II. Maybe one a month. eastlaker - language, always.

Ken - one of the most alarming things about SD history: it's so fragile. Often without knowing it, people toss away priceless objects. At the turn of the 19th century, kids used to throw rocks at an old wall on Presidio Hill. They eventually flattened the last remaining adobe wall of the original fortress.

Jay - I'm right with you. Amazes me how sometimes a single sentence or paragraph can time machine you back to a specific moment.

Aug. 4, 2014

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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