4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

San Diego's Salton Sea plan might get expensive

Audit warns of air pollution and other problems

San Diego's deal to take water from the Imperial Valley to meet the demands of growth and development here will begin taking a dramatic and expensive toll on the environment of the Salton Sea in 2017, says a new report by the California state auditor's office.

The clock is ticking toward a deadline in four years, according to the audit, when an agreement with the Imperial Valley water district to supply so-called mitigation water to the landlocked sea will expire.

Without costly action, likely financed by California taxpayers, the level of the sea will drop radically, exposing thousands of acres of new shoreline and creating a possible air-pollution disaster.

After 2017, when mitigation water is no longer conveyed into the Salton Sea, experts predict that the size of the sea will begin to decrease dramatically, causing it to become increasingly saline.

According to the experts, this will result in negative environmental impacts, including reduced habitat for fish and wildlife and increased air pollution from the dust arising from exposed portions of the dried‐up seabed

Nine alternative scenarios have been proposed, the report says, but funding remains uncertain.

The amount of land that each of the alternatives proposed to restore ranged from 110,400 acres to 224,600 acres, which equates to roughly 50 percent to nearly 100 percent of the Salton Sea’s acreage...

However, the State — after more than six years — has yet to identify an adequate funding mechanism for any of the alternatives presented, including the Preferred Alternative, perhaps because of their associated costs

Specifically, the Resources Agency estimated that the costs of each alternative would be in the billions of dollars spread out over a 75‐year period, ranging from a minimum of $2.3 billion to construct the least costly alternative up to $8.9 billion for the Preferred Alternative....

In the absence of full funding for any of the proposed restoration alternatives, officials from the Resources Agency reported that the State’s approach has been incremental, meaning that the agencies involved have undertaken restoration activities only as funding becomes available.

So far, much of the money spent on efforts to deal with the problem has been paid out in consulting and staff costs.

The audit calls for more study.

State legislators, the audit says, should require a "feasibility study to analyze and include the extent to which restoration activities could lessen the State’s future financial obligations."

Once the Legislature has approved a restoration plan, it should hold a budget hearing to consider the appropriate funding mechanism.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Pitfalls of San Diego's downtown jail – who wants 'em?

Police chiefs work the retirement bennies, Vivian Moreno, the behest scam
Next Article

El Cajon classmates Robert Houghton, Roger Anderson, Andrew Hamlin on Lester Bangs

Rock writer Richard Meltzer and fellow Creem writer on Lester; Altamont with Lester

San Diego's deal to take water from the Imperial Valley to meet the demands of growth and development here will begin taking a dramatic and expensive toll on the environment of the Salton Sea in 2017, says a new report by the California state auditor's office.

The clock is ticking toward a deadline in four years, according to the audit, when an agreement with the Imperial Valley water district to supply so-called mitigation water to the landlocked sea will expire.

Without costly action, likely financed by California taxpayers, the level of the sea will drop radically, exposing thousands of acres of new shoreline and creating a possible air-pollution disaster.

After 2017, when mitigation water is no longer conveyed into the Salton Sea, experts predict that the size of the sea will begin to decrease dramatically, causing it to become increasingly saline.

According to the experts, this will result in negative environmental impacts, including reduced habitat for fish and wildlife and increased air pollution from the dust arising from exposed portions of the dried‐up seabed

Nine alternative scenarios have been proposed, the report says, but funding remains uncertain.

The amount of land that each of the alternatives proposed to restore ranged from 110,400 acres to 224,600 acres, which equates to roughly 50 percent to nearly 100 percent of the Salton Sea’s acreage...

However, the State — after more than six years — has yet to identify an adequate funding mechanism for any of the alternatives presented, including the Preferred Alternative, perhaps because of their associated costs

Specifically, the Resources Agency estimated that the costs of each alternative would be in the billions of dollars spread out over a 75‐year period, ranging from a minimum of $2.3 billion to construct the least costly alternative up to $8.9 billion for the Preferred Alternative....

In the absence of full funding for any of the proposed restoration alternatives, officials from the Resources Agency reported that the State’s approach has been incremental, meaning that the agencies involved have undertaken restoration activities only as funding becomes available.

So far, much of the money spent on efforts to deal with the problem has been paid out in consulting and staff costs.

The audit calls for more study.

State legislators, the audit says, should require a "feasibility study to analyze and include the extent to which restoration activities could lessen the State’s future financial obligations."

Once the Legislature has approved a restoration plan, it should hold a budget hearing to consider the appropriate funding mechanism.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

San Diego lobbying payments set to hit $1.7 million

PG&E lobbyist and GOP PAC backers could be re-upped for two more years
Next Article

Dad takes girls to Oceanside's Pit Stop Diner, ends up at Tijuana hotel

Next court date for kidnapping is Feb. 17
Comments
3

How will the developers of Travertine Point provide water to the planned community of 16,600 houses adjacent to the Salton Sea? http://articles.ivpressonline.com/2013-01-15/travertine-point_36379315

Nov. 23, 2013

We should be putting water into the Salton Sea after dividing it into two parts, one of recreation and one for wildlife, as has been suggest before. This would help the area boom instead of becoming yet another waste land that has been depleted for natural resources!

We also should build a high speed rail from SD to the Salton Sea so that SD can have yet another new "bedroom community" for those that want to work in SD but live in a more affordable area.

Ever hear of solar turbine powered dehumidifiers?

We are just beginning to see what wind turbines can do!

Imagine a new "future" Multi-Functional Wind Turbine (MFWT™) that could "shift" from producing electricity to making water as the grid load or water "need" changes! This concept would provide a single solution to two of the major problems facing all developing Nations, a reliable source of Energy and a reliable source of Clean Water... Source: Clean Technica http://s.tt/17YRk +

Check this out: A turbine that makes water from the desert air: http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/a-turbine-that-makes-water-from-the-desert-air/14701?tag=nl.e660 and this: Israeli device takes the thirst out ...http://is.gd/8tPLTM

Now put the two together and imagine a new "future" Multi-Functional Wind Turbine (MFWT™) that could "shift" from producing electricity to making water or even Hydrogen (in liquid form) as the grid load or water "need" changed!

Maybe I'll get the first Solar O'Neill (SON) award for the idea!

Nov. 23, 2013

Like most SoCal's folks, I'm getting tried of this issue. Either flood it again, as it was created 100 years ago, or let it go back to desert, as it was a billion years before that.

Nov. 26, 2013

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close