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Chula Vista exhibit documents WWII Japanese internment

Prewar, they established “Celery Capital of the World”

A cot, a hand-hewn chest of drawers, and tight quarters for six men — this is the display that dominates the visual and conceptual space of the current exhibit in the Chula Vista Heritage Museum. This Land is My Land, Japanese Americans in Chula Vista features a replica of a Japanese internment camp barrack built by Frank Wada to enable his grandchildren to understand the internment experience.

Docent Pam Kesegi pointed out that when Japanese-American men like Wada were rounded up in the middle of the night by the United States government after Pearl Harbor, they were allowed to take only what they could carry.

Steeped in history from this period, Kesegi reminds the museum-goer that families lost their homes and most of them lost their belongings. Many families preferred destroying their possessions, Kesegi said, rather than sell them for the pennies they were offered.

According to the exhibit brochure, “Most of the 450 Japanese from Chula Vista spent the duration of the war in Poston, a hastily built ‘internment camp’ in the Arizona desert. There, they created new homes in the rustic barracks and a new community inside the barbed wire.”

Though the museum building is small, the exhibit makes creative use of space. Anti-Japanese cartoons created by Dr. Seuss (for which he later apologized) are mounted on one wall.

On another wall, a monitor rolls two videos that juxtapose the official story of the internment as told by the United States Office of War with a 15-minute clip from a series called “Once Upon a Camp.”

The first video gives a positive interpretation of the need for internment and shows Japanese Americans leading normal and fulfilled lives in the camps.

The second video features grimmer scenes from Poston and voice- overs from children reading letters from the camp. The children were corresponding with San Diego librarian Clara Breed.

Kesegi filled in the background. She said Breed had been a children’s librarian and had a relationship with many of the children who were rounded up. When she heard they were being shipped out, she met them at the train and handed them pre-addressed envelopes and kept up a correspondence with many children during World War II. A book about these exchanges has recently been published: Dear Miss Breed: True Stories of the Japanese American Incarceration During World War II and a Librarian Who Made a Difference.

The exhibit also celebrates many of the contributions Japanese Americans have made to the community and the local economy, including garnering Chula Vista the title of “Celery Capital of the World.”

Peter Watry, who cofounded the museum with Frank Roseman, was on hand for the museum tour. He advised people to get into the museum soon, as the exhibit ends in May. The next yearlong exhibit will be put on by the Chula Vista Police Department.

The Chula Vista Heritage Museum is located at 360 Third Avenue. Museum. Hours are 12:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday, 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday.

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A cot, a hand-hewn chest of drawers, and tight quarters for six men — this is the display that dominates the visual and conceptual space of the current exhibit in the Chula Vista Heritage Museum. This Land is My Land, Japanese Americans in Chula Vista features a replica of a Japanese internment camp barrack built by Frank Wada to enable his grandchildren to understand the internment experience.

Docent Pam Kesegi pointed out that when Japanese-American men like Wada were rounded up in the middle of the night by the United States government after Pearl Harbor, they were allowed to take only what they could carry.

Steeped in history from this period, Kesegi reminds the museum-goer that families lost their homes and most of them lost their belongings. Many families preferred destroying their possessions, Kesegi said, rather than sell them for the pennies they were offered.

According to the exhibit brochure, “Most of the 450 Japanese from Chula Vista spent the duration of the war in Poston, a hastily built ‘internment camp’ in the Arizona desert. There, they created new homes in the rustic barracks and a new community inside the barbed wire.”

Though the museum building is small, the exhibit makes creative use of space. Anti-Japanese cartoons created by Dr. Seuss (for which he later apologized) are mounted on one wall.

On another wall, a monitor rolls two videos that juxtapose the official story of the internment as told by the United States Office of War with a 15-minute clip from a series called “Once Upon a Camp.”

The first video gives a positive interpretation of the need for internment and shows Japanese Americans leading normal and fulfilled lives in the camps.

The second video features grimmer scenes from Poston and voice- overs from children reading letters from the camp. The children were corresponding with San Diego librarian Clara Breed.

Kesegi filled in the background. She said Breed had been a children’s librarian and had a relationship with many of the children who were rounded up. When she heard they were being shipped out, she met them at the train and handed them pre-addressed envelopes and kept up a correspondence with many children during World War II. A book about these exchanges has recently been published: Dear Miss Breed: True Stories of the Japanese American Incarceration During World War II and a Librarian Who Made a Difference.

The exhibit also celebrates many of the contributions Japanese Americans have made to the community and the local economy, including garnering Chula Vista the title of “Celery Capital of the World.”

Peter Watry, who cofounded the museum with Frank Roseman, was on hand for the museum tour. He advised people to get into the museum soon, as the exhibit ends in May. The next yearlong exhibit will be put on by the Chula Vista Police Department.

The Chula Vista Heritage Museum is located at 360 Third Avenue. Museum. Hours are 12:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday, 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday.

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Only Japanese citizens residing in the U.S. who refused to sign loyalty oaths to the U.S. government and renounce loyalty to the Japanese Emperor were put in internment camps. Most were unwilling to sign the oaths because they were uneducated and believed the Emperor was God. The only U.S. citizens of Japanese descent who were put in internment camps were the U.S. born minor children of Japanese citizens who refused to sign loyalty oaths.

May 19, 2013

All Japanese citizens up to 1/4 Japanese were relocated unless they were on farms where the farmers signed a note agreeing that they were needed for labor, or if they lived in Hawaii. All citizens were processed through main internment camps, one being Tule Lake. The majority of the Japanese who were interred signed the oath. Some did not sign it because the way it was worded it implied that they had previously been loyal to the emperor. Since they had never been loyal to the emperor, they did not want to sign it. Many had been born in the United States and felt no connection to Japan. Most immigrants were thankful for the opportunities available in the United States. Over 120,000 Japanese were interred in 10 camps, some actually located in horse barns, others in old barracks. At Camp Minidoka the Japanese had to build their own furniture from scrap wood and sagebrush. Ironically, they were located near a German prisoner of war camp. Despite the poor treatment of their parents, grandparents, and siblings, many Japanese men volunteered to defend this country. The most famous being the 442 which is the most highly decorated group in the U.S. Another group served as interpreters in military intelligence.

June 24, 2013

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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