4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Righteous Exploits slated for August open and September run

“The big worry,” says Margaret Noble, “is how much will you be like your parents and your grandparents...in ways you want, and don’t want.”

Her new production, *Righteous Exploits,* attempts to address that. It opens August 7th at the San Diego Museum of Art before getting a full run at Liberty Station’s White Box Theater from September 19th-22nd.

Without trying to reduce a Righteous Exploits to an unsatisfactory bullet point, the anxiety that we are all engaged in a process of becoming our parents, mostly by repeating their mistakes, is the unifying chord of Noble’s performance.

Noble knows that “performance art” is a loaded term for some people, and she’s justifiably careful with it. Not wanting to be confused with “the weird stuff that happened in the 1970’s...people throwing raw meat at feminists,” she draws a stronger connection between Righteous Exploits and conventional theatre, since the structure of the performance is ultimately centered around a generational narrative.

“[Righteous Exploits] is somewhere in the middle,” she says. “We’re using visual media, in particular three overhead projectors to represent the story visually. But there’s also real storytelling going on. I’m working with [So Say We All director] Justin Hudnall, who is an amazing storyteller.”

In terms of technique, Hudnall narrates the hour-long performance while Noble works the projectors and provides an ambient score, putting to work her MFA in sound art from the University of Chicago. Noble says that the overall effect is more cinematic than anything else, but with the immediacy of theatre instead of the remove of cinema.

Righteous Exploits began with Noble’s attempt to track down an antique set of stories, The Unvarnished Truth, told by the downtrodden and impoverished, and sold as entertainment. From there, she got drawn into the story of her own grandmother, a woman who campaigned for the rights of migrant workers, drawing the ire of the FBI and HUAC in paranoid, mid-century America. Finally, Noble ended up in introspection, realizing that the story she wanted to tell was her own.

“I think I picked up all the bad behavior of my ancestors, and now I’m trying to break it,” she says, with the candor that she feels gives Righteous Exploits its power.

Since the performance became autobiographical, Noble is putting her own bad behavior on display. There’s great vulnerability to judgment in that, but Noble thinks that using her personal narrative gives people a chance to open up, to turn their gazes inward and accept the unique sets of bad (and good) habits they’ve inherited from their parents and grandparents. Instead of a chance to sit in judgment of the artist, which may well happen anyways, there’s a chance for connection and acknowledgment of the universal appeal of the generational narrative.

Because of the personal nature of the show, Righteous Exploits is a pointed experience for Noble, something she hopes translates to viewers.

“It’s really for anybody interested in having an intense ride,” she says. Noble goes on to explain that she’s “rattling the cage” of her family connection, and that the experience was difficult for her and her mother, who nevertheless gave the show her blessing. “It was healthy to clear the air,” but the idea of questioning personal identity by prising open generational narratives and casting a critical eye towards the quasi-sacred space of family, and all the baggage that entails, is necessarily painful. She feels that uncovering the bad behaviors inherited from mom and grandma was ultimately restorative for her and her connection to her family.

Righteous Exploits hopes to be raw, confessional, and intimate. Its creator hopes to raise self-critical awareness of the repetitive nature of the generational narratives that seem to catch us all in patterns of repeating our parents' and grandparents' mistakes instead of learning from them. That should resonate with anyone who has ever been surprised by a momentary vision of his father's face in the mirror.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

At Windansea they will drop in on you

Concussion at San Clemente
Next Article

Waste and Covid-19 missteps plague CoreCivic's border lockup

"We determined ICE paid more than $22 million for unused bed space"

“The big worry,” says Margaret Noble, “is how much will you be like your parents and your grandparents...in ways you want, and don’t want.”

Her new production, *Righteous Exploits,* attempts to address that. It opens August 7th at the San Diego Museum of Art before getting a full run at Liberty Station’s White Box Theater from September 19th-22nd.

Without trying to reduce a Righteous Exploits to an unsatisfactory bullet point, the anxiety that we are all engaged in a process of becoming our parents, mostly by repeating their mistakes, is the unifying chord of Noble’s performance.

Noble knows that “performance art” is a loaded term for some people, and she’s justifiably careful with it. Not wanting to be confused with “the weird stuff that happened in the 1970’s...people throwing raw meat at feminists,” she draws a stronger connection between Righteous Exploits and conventional theatre, since the structure of the performance is ultimately centered around a generational narrative.

“[Righteous Exploits] is somewhere in the middle,” she says. “We’re using visual media, in particular three overhead projectors to represent the story visually. But there’s also real storytelling going on. I’m working with [So Say We All director] Justin Hudnall, who is an amazing storyteller.”

In terms of technique, Hudnall narrates the hour-long performance while Noble works the projectors and provides an ambient score, putting to work her MFA in sound art from the University of Chicago. Noble says that the overall effect is more cinematic than anything else, but with the immediacy of theatre instead of the remove of cinema.

Righteous Exploits began with Noble’s attempt to track down an antique set of stories, The Unvarnished Truth, told by the downtrodden and impoverished, and sold as entertainment. From there, she got drawn into the story of her own grandmother, a woman who campaigned for the rights of migrant workers, drawing the ire of the FBI and HUAC in paranoid, mid-century America. Finally, Noble ended up in introspection, realizing that the story she wanted to tell was her own.

“I think I picked up all the bad behavior of my ancestors, and now I’m trying to break it,” she says, with the candor that she feels gives Righteous Exploits its power.

Since the performance became autobiographical, Noble is putting her own bad behavior on display. There’s great vulnerability to judgment in that, but Noble thinks that using her personal narrative gives people a chance to open up, to turn their gazes inward and accept the unique sets of bad (and good) habits they’ve inherited from their parents and grandparents. Instead of a chance to sit in judgment of the artist, which may well happen anyways, there’s a chance for connection and acknowledgment of the universal appeal of the generational narrative.

Because of the personal nature of the show, Righteous Exploits is a pointed experience for Noble, something she hopes translates to viewers.

“It’s really for anybody interested in having an intense ride,” she says. Noble goes on to explain that she’s “rattling the cage” of her family connection, and that the experience was difficult for her and her mother, who nevertheless gave the show her blessing. “It was healthy to clear the air,” but the idea of questioning personal identity by prising open generational narratives and casting a critical eye towards the quasi-sacred space of family, and all the baggage that entails, is necessarily painful. She feels that uncovering the bad behaviors inherited from mom and grandma was ultimately restorative for her and her connection to her family.

Righteous Exploits hopes to be raw, confessional, and intimate. Its creator hopes to raise self-critical awareness of the repetitive nature of the generational narratives that seem to catch us all in patterns of repeating our parents' and grandparents' mistakes instead of learning from them. That should resonate with anyone who has ever been surprised by a momentary vision of his father's face in the mirror.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

San Diego in books - first Datsun dealer to sell 100 cars in a month, Bob Woodward on Belushi

La Jolla's historian, Edmund Wilson on the Hotel del Coronado
Next Article

Little Italy Scavanger Hunt, Jason Mraz

Events September 26-September 29, 2021
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close