Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

A roll up a gravity hill

Image by Rick Geary

Mattster:

In my ’50s cruising days, after hitting Oscar’s Drive In on El Cajon Boulevard, one stop we would always make was at a “magnetic hill” where steel cans appeared to roll uphill. I believe it was called Merlin Drive, but it might have been somewhere near the beach. Am I remembering this right?

— Sleepless in Spring Valley

“Magnetic hills,” also called “gravity hills,” are a worldwide phenomenon, and San Diego has had its fair share of mystical slopes over the years. I don’t know if Merlin Drive (I assume you mean the road in Lemon Grove) ever had the reputation as a gravity hill, but it might have back in the ’50s. Nowadays, the best gravity hill in San Diego is actually a freeway off-ramp. If you exit 805 to Sorrento Valley and leave your car in neutral at the bottom of the ramp, you will roll back up the ramp while you wait for the light to change. It’s creepy.

Folksy origins for gravity hills usually involve some paranormal activity. A popular backstory used for a lot of them is that, 50/60/70 or however many years ago, a school bus full of kids stalled out on the hill and the children all tried to push the bus. Something went tragically wrong and all of the rugrats died horrible deaths beneath the wheels of the bus. Forever after, the ghosts of the children reach out from beyond the grave and push unwitting drivers up the hill. Other popular explanations involve “gravitational anomalies” that somehow negate the attraction between physical bodies; and that’s a quantum mechanical attraction, not a Tom Jones kind of attraction, for all you dirty birds out there.

Sadly, there are neither ghosts nor strange attractors at work behind the gravity hill phenomenon. It’s just an optical illusion that makes the slope of the hill appear to run in the opposite direction. Usually, the miscue comes from a weird perspective on the horizon caused by a treeline, buildings, or something else that interferes with a normal frame of visual reference. It becomes impossible to determine what’s “level” by visual cues alone. In the case of the Sorrento Valley off-ramp, the road actually turns upward just a little bit at the very end of the ramp; but because of the swooping, curving geometry of the freeway system, it’s difficult to tell just by looking at it.

There’s another freeway segment that seems to defy gravity, but it’s not as well known to cars because nobody ever stops in the middle of the freeway to try rolling up a hill. The stretch of I-8 west between Descanso and the Willows Road exit is open to bicycles and many a rider is familiar with the “hill” that can be climbed at 25 or 30 mph with relative ease. If it’s not outright downward, it’s at least flat.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Jupiter Symphony – good to vacuum by

Coming up at Mainly Mozart
Next Article

We Got Beef on the waterfront

Local jerky maker spices up weekend bayside markets
Image by Rick Geary

Mattster:

In my ’50s cruising days, after hitting Oscar’s Drive In on El Cajon Boulevard, one stop we would always make was at a “magnetic hill” where steel cans appeared to roll uphill. I believe it was called Merlin Drive, but it might have been somewhere near the beach. Am I remembering this right?

— Sleepless in Spring Valley

“Magnetic hills,” also called “gravity hills,” are a worldwide phenomenon, and San Diego has had its fair share of mystical slopes over the years. I don’t know if Merlin Drive (I assume you mean the road in Lemon Grove) ever had the reputation as a gravity hill, but it might have back in the ’50s. Nowadays, the best gravity hill in San Diego is actually a freeway off-ramp. If you exit 805 to Sorrento Valley and leave your car in neutral at the bottom of the ramp, you will roll back up the ramp while you wait for the light to change. It’s creepy.

Folksy origins for gravity hills usually involve some paranormal activity. A popular backstory used for a lot of them is that, 50/60/70 or however many years ago, a school bus full of kids stalled out on the hill and the children all tried to push the bus. Something went tragically wrong and all of the rugrats died horrible deaths beneath the wheels of the bus. Forever after, the ghosts of the children reach out from beyond the grave and push unwitting drivers up the hill. Other popular explanations involve “gravitational anomalies” that somehow negate the attraction between physical bodies; and that’s a quantum mechanical attraction, not a Tom Jones kind of attraction, for all you dirty birds out there.

Sadly, there are neither ghosts nor strange attractors at work behind the gravity hill phenomenon. It’s just an optical illusion that makes the slope of the hill appear to run in the opposite direction. Usually, the miscue comes from a weird perspective on the horizon caused by a treeline, buildings, or something else that interferes with a normal frame of visual reference. It becomes impossible to determine what’s “level” by visual cues alone. In the case of the Sorrento Valley off-ramp, the road actually turns upward just a little bit at the very end of the ramp; but because of the swooping, curving geometry of the freeway system, it’s difficult to tell just by looking at it.

There’s another freeway segment that seems to defy gravity, but it’s not as well known to cars because nobody ever stops in the middle of the freeway to try rolling up a hill. The stretch of I-8 west between Descanso and the Willows Road exit is open to bicycles and many a rider is familiar with the “hill” that can be climbed at 25 or 30 mph with relative ease. If it’s not outright downward, it’s at least flat.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Emperor Shirakawa offers a prayer to Hachiman

The proponent of Esoteric Buddhism allows for the inclusion of other faiths
Next Article

Las Cuatro Milpas: four bucks in the barrio

“Our customers keep coming. Still 80 percent white people!”
Comments
2

The spot I always use to illustrate this phenomena to friends is the Mountain Springs Road exit climbing the I-8 grade westbound leaving the Imperial Valley after a desert camping trip...if someone needs a bathroom break I tell them to make sure to pee uphill.

Feb. 17, 2013

Thank you so much for that bit of info. I'm watching Paranormal Caught on Camera S01 Ep02 and they talk about Gravity Hill somewhere in the US.

Of course it immediately made me think of this spot. I grew up in the Imperial Valley, El Centro to be exact and I know precisely where this spot is but I couldn't remember the name of the off ramp. I can see it perfectly in my mind's eye.

I was a little bummed when I read the article thinking I'd get my answer as I had no idea this other place existed so thanks a lot for helping me out.

This brings back so many great memories. There's NOT much to do as you're driving from EC to SD. Well, except stopping at the Desert View Tower. As kids we used to love to stop and hike around the red rocks looking for snakes and then check out the little store inside.

It too has been years since I've been there as it's pretty boring unless you're a kid but now I'm a grandma with 2 rambunctious grandsons that would love that place. So again thanks for the knowledge and run down memory lane. I owe you! Missing Cali and I-8.

March 20, 2019

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close