Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Observation Hour

Katie greets two pups
Katie greets two pups

I thought it would take more than the promise of seeing a few dogs to incentivize making a trip to El Cajon in the middle of a heat wave. The temperature climbs one degree for every mile I travel east from my home. El Cajon is 20 degrees away, which meant I was driving into a 108-degree inferno. I blasted the air conditioning in my car and refocused my thoughts on the cuteness that awaited me.

My friend Katie, who knows about my soft spot for dogs, invited me to check out the kennel and dog-rescue organization for which she volunteers. It wasn’t until I pulled up in front of the Barking Lot that it occurred to me that — despite all those animal fundraising galas and pet expos — I’d never stepped foot inside an animal shelter.

The reception desk was empty, but nearly a dozen dogs were there to greet me on the other side of a short wall. I stepped in and allowed them to jump and sniff at me, all the while amazed that these creatures were just hanging out with each other in the front room, as though they were old friends. I stared in awe at the one dog that didn’t seem interested in me — a slender, snow-white husky with ice-blue eyes. Four puppies whimpered for attention in a cage set on a tall shelf. I put my hand to it and let them lick my fingers. That’s when Katie found me.

Apparently, Katie’s volunteer work was very hands-on: her black running pants and red Barking Lot T-shirt were covered in dog hair, and she wore black latex gloves to protect her hands from I-didn’t-want-to-think-about-what. “Is it okay if I don’t hug you?” I said. Katie smiled knowingly and nodded. Then she led me through the door to the first of two giant dog-storage rooms.

The barking began before we we’d fully crossed the threshold. The room was filled with chest-high cages, each containing at least one, but more often two dogs. “All the dogs you see in here were rescued from death row,” Katie shouted above the barking. “Well, at least 95 percent of them; some are from Mexico. A shelter went bankrupt in San Bernardino, and because they have no public funding, they’ve been putting dogs down fast. We have volunteers driving down as many as they can get.”

Katie led me down an aisle between cages to a play area that she needed to clean so she could make a video of some puppies that just arrived; she’d post it on the website she maintains voluntarily. As we winded our way through the room, I was vaguely aware that I was avoiding eye contact with the dogs.

I stood by and watched as Katie shoveled shit into a bucket and then mopped the concrete with bleach. “You just stepped in a poo smear,” I said.

“Why do you think I keep these sneakers on my porch?” Katie smiled. I made a mental note to disinfect my sandals when I got home.

When she’d finished shoveling and bleaching and hosing down, Katie fetched a blue animal carrier and brought it to the play yard. “These are the three Good Fairies,” she said as she opened the small door to allow three tiny white dogs to come bursting out and scamper around as they explored the area. “Fauna, Flora, and Merryweather.” She turned on the recorder in her hands and introduced them again.

“What’s the deal with their hair?” I said.

Katie stopped the recorder. “Well, I can’t use that now,” she said.

“Oops, sorry. But, seriously. Like, that one’s got a bald spot or something.”

“They’re a mix of wirehaired and Jack Russell terriers,” Katie explained. “And they’re just puppies — the hair can be thin in areas, but it should get thicker as they get older. Though they won’t get much bigger, they’ll always be little ladies.”

“Cool,” I said. “Sorry to screw up your recording, I was just wondering. I mean, they’re so sweet, their names suit them and all — just not my aesthetic preference. You know me, I’m more drawn to the big fluffy ones with sad eyes.”

While Katie returned the Good Fairies to their temporary barking spot, I decided to check out the other pups in residence. I read the names and breeds marked on the cages. They explained why all of these dogs looked so different than the purebred pooches I was more accustomed to seeing. There was a corgi/beagle (a ceagle? Borgi?), a terrier/pug, and a Labrador/Rottweiler. Only the pit bulls, of which there were many, bore an obvious resemblance to each other. But there was one aspect that every dog shared: a raised brow and expectant gaze as I drew close. It’s the ones that didn’t bark, but simply lifted their heads and stared, that tugged most at my heartstrings.

“How can you be here every week and not want to take all of them home with you?”

“I already have two dogs,” Katie said.

“It’s just...it breaks my heart.” I tore my eyes away from a striking St. Bernard/husky mutt named Beethoven.

“We’re always looking for volunteers.”

“Yeah, I don’t do well with poo,” I said. “But let me know if you ever need help with affection time. Or, better yet, if you need someone to sit off to the side and watch them, like an observation hour. I could collect data about their behavior or something. That’s more my speed.” Katie laughed, but I sensed she was also disappointed.

When I got home to David, I was feeling morose. We’d had the discussion a hundred times, and we are in agreement that we’re not ready to have a pet, for myriad reasons. I wasn’t sad because I wanted to bring one of those dogs home — I was sad because I didn’t want to.

“I feel so bad for all those dogs,” I said after I’d finished briefing David on my excursion to El Cajon. “I think Katie would have been happy if I fell in love with one and took it home. Am I a bad person?”

“I feel bad for orphans,” David said. “That doesn’t mean I’m going to adopt one.”

“Oh, I see,” I said, defeated. “We’re both terrible people.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Ocean Beach trash altruist

Cameron Reid covers Niagara and Narragansett, Sunset Cliffs to Abbott.
Next Article

Wall of Moms MAGA?

Non-profit expands efforts to include stopping flow of drugs to kids
Katie greets two pups
Katie greets two pups

I thought it would take more than the promise of seeing a few dogs to incentivize making a trip to El Cajon in the middle of a heat wave. The temperature climbs one degree for every mile I travel east from my home. El Cajon is 20 degrees away, which meant I was driving into a 108-degree inferno. I blasted the air conditioning in my car and refocused my thoughts on the cuteness that awaited me.

My friend Katie, who knows about my soft spot for dogs, invited me to check out the kennel and dog-rescue organization for which she volunteers. It wasn’t until I pulled up in front of the Barking Lot that it occurred to me that — despite all those animal fundraising galas and pet expos — I’d never stepped foot inside an animal shelter.

The reception desk was empty, but nearly a dozen dogs were there to greet me on the other side of a short wall. I stepped in and allowed them to jump and sniff at me, all the while amazed that these creatures were just hanging out with each other in the front room, as though they were old friends. I stared in awe at the one dog that didn’t seem interested in me — a slender, snow-white husky with ice-blue eyes. Four puppies whimpered for attention in a cage set on a tall shelf. I put my hand to it and let them lick my fingers. That’s when Katie found me.

Apparently, Katie’s volunteer work was very hands-on: her black running pants and red Barking Lot T-shirt were covered in dog hair, and she wore black latex gloves to protect her hands from I-didn’t-want-to-think-about-what. “Is it okay if I don’t hug you?” I said. Katie smiled knowingly and nodded. Then she led me through the door to the first of two giant dog-storage rooms.

The barking began before we we’d fully crossed the threshold. The room was filled with chest-high cages, each containing at least one, but more often two dogs. “All the dogs you see in here were rescued from death row,” Katie shouted above the barking. “Well, at least 95 percent of them; some are from Mexico. A shelter went bankrupt in San Bernardino, and because they have no public funding, they’ve been putting dogs down fast. We have volunteers driving down as many as they can get.”

Katie led me down an aisle between cages to a play area that she needed to clean so she could make a video of some puppies that just arrived; she’d post it on the website she maintains voluntarily. As we winded our way through the room, I was vaguely aware that I was avoiding eye contact with the dogs.

I stood by and watched as Katie shoveled shit into a bucket and then mopped the concrete with bleach. “You just stepped in a poo smear,” I said.

“Why do you think I keep these sneakers on my porch?” Katie smiled. I made a mental note to disinfect my sandals when I got home.

When she’d finished shoveling and bleaching and hosing down, Katie fetched a blue animal carrier and brought it to the play yard. “These are the three Good Fairies,” she said as she opened the small door to allow three tiny white dogs to come bursting out and scamper around as they explored the area. “Fauna, Flora, and Merryweather.” She turned on the recorder in her hands and introduced them again.

“What’s the deal with their hair?” I said.

Katie stopped the recorder. “Well, I can’t use that now,” she said.

“Oops, sorry. But, seriously. Like, that one’s got a bald spot or something.”

“They’re a mix of wirehaired and Jack Russell terriers,” Katie explained. “And they’re just puppies — the hair can be thin in areas, but it should get thicker as they get older. Though they won’t get much bigger, they’ll always be little ladies.”

“Cool,” I said. “Sorry to screw up your recording, I was just wondering. I mean, they’re so sweet, their names suit them and all — just not my aesthetic preference. You know me, I’m more drawn to the big fluffy ones with sad eyes.”

While Katie returned the Good Fairies to their temporary barking spot, I decided to check out the other pups in residence. I read the names and breeds marked on the cages. They explained why all of these dogs looked so different than the purebred pooches I was more accustomed to seeing. There was a corgi/beagle (a ceagle? Borgi?), a terrier/pug, and a Labrador/Rottweiler. Only the pit bulls, of which there were many, bore an obvious resemblance to each other. But there was one aspect that every dog shared: a raised brow and expectant gaze as I drew close. It’s the ones that didn’t bark, but simply lifted their heads and stared, that tugged most at my heartstrings.

“How can you be here every week and not want to take all of them home with you?”

“I already have two dogs,” Katie said.

“It’s just...it breaks my heart.” I tore my eyes away from a striking St. Bernard/husky mutt named Beethoven.

“We’re always looking for volunteers.”

“Yeah, I don’t do well with poo,” I said. “But let me know if you ever need help with affection time. Or, better yet, if you need someone to sit off to the side and watch them, like an observation hour. I could collect data about their behavior or something. That’s more my speed.” Katie laughed, but I sensed she was also disappointed.

When I got home to David, I was feeling morose. We’d had the discussion a hundred times, and we are in agreement that we’re not ready to have a pet, for myriad reasons. I wasn’t sad because I wanted to bring one of those dogs home — I was sad because I didn’t want to.

“I feel so bad for all those dogs,” I said after I’d finished briefing David on my excursion to El Cajon. “I think Katie would have been happy if I fell in love with one and took it home. Am I a bad person?”

“I feel bad for orphans,” David said. “That doesn’t mean I’m going to adopt one.”

“Oh, I see,” I said, defeated. “We’re both terrible people.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

North Park – the prime quartier

30th Street parking, Georgia Street bridge, PSA crash, water tower, North Park Main Street
Next Article

Ocean Beach trash altruist

Cameron Reid covers Niagara and Narragansett, Sunset Cliffs to Abbott.
Comments
16

Lindsay H. says: Such a great article! I adopted my little Truffle puppy from the Barking Lot after heading down 3 times to find the right match (each time in tears bc I wish I could take them all home). The good news (which volunteer Teresa told me) is that these dogs DO have a good "foster" home with the Barking Lot. No killing, they get fed, blankets, cleaned up after, walked, bathed and always some love. It may not be a forever home, but these people are amazing and truly care about the well being of the animals!!

Oct. 3, 2012

Katie (from the article) just wrote this on FB. I think I'm being mocked, but I have a feeling it's all in good fun. "Barbarella Fokos was really out of her luxury element, but she soldiered on. It's not easy to watch other people mop. :)"

Oct. 3, 2012

You're not a bad person. A bad person walks away sans emotion from such an event. I adopted from a shelter once. Walked in there with my roommates, and we were hell bent on leaving with a dog. Once we entered the cage area, we fell apart. How do you choose but one dog? And trust me, these dogs know exactly what's going on every time somebody enters the room, they know a new human walks in, and one of their buds will leave. Forever. We basically chose a group of dogs, entered the cage, played with them then backed up and asked them "Who wants to come home with us?" One dog jumped up and placed his front paws on my friends legs. And he was the chosen one.

There's way too many abandoned animals out there. This place you went to sounds way overloaded. Do they recruit volunteer dog walkers? That could be cool... help put a smile on a puppy's face for a day (oh yeah, they smile). I live on a boat, until I move to land, I can't have a dog... Life choices huh?

Oct. 3, 2012

Have worked MANY rescues with the Barking Lot. We had a huge set back a few days ago with a shelter dog that was killed a few minutes before Ashley Corrigan Steffey could arrive and save him, it was devastating to the dog rescue community and the Barking Lot. The Barking Lot is one of the best dog rescue groups in So Cal. Thank you Ashley for doing everythig you could for Beethoven.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=139713166174395&set=a.141676192644759.47205.100004071381290&type=1&comment_id=174061

Oct. 3, 2012

Wow, you're an angel. Thank you for being the best that humanity has to offer. It's an honor to have you comment on my page.

The only thing I've done lately is give lots of press to a local adoption organization that needed it. Like I said in my "not great" story, I'm a terrible person. ;)

Oct. 6, 2012

Hopefully your kids didn't get your "judgmental" and "humorless" genes.

Have you read Barbarella's column before? Did you not pick up on her self-deprecating humor?

Let me guess, you also share posts from "The Onion" in self-righteous outrage because you haven't figured out they are satire.

Oct. 6, 2012

Sorry,but I just don"t see the humor. I have read Barb's blogs for years now and find nouthing funny about these poor homeless animals. I just do not get it.

Jan. 19, 2013

find nothing funny about these poor homeless animals. I just do not get it.

There is no humor in homeless animals, they need our help as they cannot help themselves................

Jan. 19, 2013

You took a piece about a dog shelter, and somehow made it about you and how wonderful you are? David and Barbarella do know the world doesn't revolve around them - do you?

Oct. 7, 2012

Are the two goldens in the photo up for adoption?! -Alex

Oct. 16, 2012

Alex, there are so many GREAT dogs that need a home.......if these two are adopted, go visit an adoption event, don't limit yourself....They have an awesome dog named "Big Boy" who needs a home too.......ask about him.

Oct. 17, 2012

Those were Golden Weenies, and I think they already found a forever home, but you can go on the Barking Lot web site and see all the pups currently in residence. Are you thinking about getting a sibling for Lacy? :)

Oct. 17, 2012

Bisque and Gazpacho are still available! We think they are lab/basset hound mixes. Really sweet young girls that love people and other dogs. You can fill out an application for them at www.thebarkinglot.net/adoption-application.

Oct. 17, 2012

Thanks for the update, Katie!

Oct. 17, 2012

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close