Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Tijuana puppy rescue


Strays down south still have it rough

There are countless stray cats and dogs in Tijuana, and animal control is done mostly by accidental roadkill or by people who kill animals for pleasure. Pet-ownership culture is completely different in a country that just recently started to adopt and evolve its laws on animal cruelty.

Some animal-killers in Tijuana have declared their crimes on social media, proudly posting pictures and videos of animal cruelty, which quickly prompts negative reactions. 



Local animal lovers and NGOs, such as ProvidAnimal TJ, AVPCA, Dog Rescue Without Borders and Baja Dog Rescue, help by adopting, finding shelter, sterilizing, and educating people of proper animal care. However, machismo culture in Mexico deems it cruel to spay or neuter a pet, and that no matter how many strays are adopted, there will always be more. It is also part of the culture to let your animals roam freely outside in the neighborhood and for them to find their own way home.


I was crossing the street of Calle Segunda and Martínez (where the remodeling of Segunda begins) before midnight on Saturday, June 28. The late-night drivers were honking at a car that had stopped at the intersection. A driver saw a puppy crossing the street, jumped out of his car, picked it up and chucked the puppy to the side of the road. The puppy shrieked as he fell down a ditch. I heard the man murmur “oops” as he ran back to his car.



I looked straight ahead, trying to avoid the guilt one feels when seeing a stray and there's not much you can do about it. But puppy yelps made me look into the ditch. A tiny mongrel came out crying, and as soon as she saw me, she started wagging her tail rapidly. The puppy ran behind me and followed me for blocks to Tacos El Rey, where I fed her some of my carne asada.

She followed me to my apartment, where she couldn't climb up the first step. I had no choice but to give her temporary housing while I found her a different home. 

“I was there last year, on the first march where we asked penalization against animal cruelty,” said Alejandra Molina, a local animal lover. “It got done, but there's no word about it or no one really knows you can actually report animal cruelty. There's now an association of animal-rights lawyers here in Tijuana.”

Molina was one of the first persons to share my pictures of the puppy on Facebook to help me find her the right home. 


“People here see sterilization as a taboo. They believe the animals just get sad and gain weight if you fix them. But what they don't realize is that it makes them more sedentary, obedient and calm, and less aggressive and territorial. There are also a lot of people that don't sterilize because they rather breed their mascots and sell them for cheap on the street.” 


The puppy had a lot of health issues and also shit all over the apartment, which neither my roommate nor my cat were happy about. The veterinarian down the street helped me get the puppy in better shape for free. People from both sides of the border have been supportive in finding her a good home. The puppy is currently in a different foster home with a friend of Alejandra who saw the shared picture and offered to take the pup from me. She will take care of the puppy until she is big enough to receive her vaccines so she can cross the border to a home in the USA.  

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

No delay for deletion of parking on 30th Street

City cycling manager swears the mayor’s order doesn’t make it official
Next Article

Oktoberfest beers to drink at home

Pick up a stein, or have this year’s märzen delivered

There are countless stray cats and dogs in Tijuana, and animal control is done mostly by accidental roadkill or by people who kill animals for pleasure. Pet-ownership culture is completely different in a country that just recently started to adopt and evolve its laws on animal cruelty.

Some animal-killers in Tijuana have declared their crimes on social media, proudly posting pictures and videos of animal cruelty, which quickly prompts negative reactions. 



Local animal lovers and NGOs, such as ProvidAnimal TJ, AVPCA, Dog Rescue Without Borders and Baja Dog Rescue, help by adopting, finding shelter, sterilizing, and educating people of proper animal care. However, machismo culture in Mexico deems it cruel to spay or neuter a pet, and that no matter how many strays are adopted, there will always be more. It is also part of the culture to let your animals roam freely outside in the neighborhood and for them to find their own way home.


I was crossing the street of Calle Segunda and Martínez (where the remodeling of Segunda begins) before midnight on Saturday, June 28. The late-night drivers were honking at a car that had stopped at the intersection. A driver saw a puppy crossing the street, jumped out of his car, picked it up and chucked the puppy to the side of the road. The puppy shrieked as he fell down a ditch. I heard the man murmur “oops” as he ran back to his car.



I looked straight ahead, trying to avoid the guilt one feels when seeing a stray and there's not much you can do about it. But puppy yelps made me look into the ditch. A tiny mongrel came out crying, and as soon as she saw me, she started wagging her tail rapidly. The puppy ran behind me and followed me for blocks to Tacos El Rey, where I fed her some of my carne asada.

She followed me to my apartment, where she couldn't climb up the first step. I had no choice but to give her temporary housing while I found her a different home. 

“I was there last year, on the first march where we asked penalization against animal cruelty,” said Alejandra Molina, a local animal lover. “It got done, but there's no word about it or no one really knows you can actually report animal cruelty. There's now an association of animal-rights lawyers here in Tijuana.”

Molina was one of the first persons to share my pictures of the puppy on Facebook to help me find her the right home. 


“People here see sterilization as a taboo. They believe the animals just get sad and gain weight if you fix them. But what they don't realize is that it makes them more sedentary, obedient and calm, and less aggressive and territorial. There are also a lot of people that don't sterilize because they rather breed their mascots and sell them for cheap on the street.” 


The puppy had a lot of health issues and also shit all over the apartment, which neither my roommate nor my cat were happy about. The veterinarian down the street helped me get the puppy in better shape for free. People from both sides of the border have been supportive in finding her a good home. The puppy is currently in a different foster home with a friend of Alejandra who saw the shared picture and offered to take the pup from me. She will take care of the puppy until she is big enough to receive her vaccines so she can cross the border to a home in the USA.  

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

De Anza Cove terrorized, La Jolla Cove cesspool, doomed life in Eastlake, South vs North Park, displaced persons in City Heights

Quirky San Diego neighborhoods
Next Article

Santa Ana winds bring San Diego's driest days; where to cool off; best view of Mars till 2033

Natural San Diego, September 28-October 4
Comments
3

I got a 4 month old puppy from Tijuana Rescue around 10 years ago. They told me she was a husky, something I thought I wanted at the time. That was at a PetSmart (Aero Drive) adoption. She turned out to be the funniest personality and is a mixed Border Collie. A vet has told me she probably had parvo early on because of the way she holds her mouth and teeth, but she's fine. I was shopping for dog food at the same Pet Smart before Xmas, 3 years ago and a guy standing in front had 2 chihuahuas, maybe 2 months old, the female was white, the boy was mostly black with some brown around the ears and belly. He wanted a hundred, I asked if he would take 60 because I had to get the tiny thing checked by a vet, right now, to bring her home (wanted another female) which I did get done and she is kinda leader of the pack;0 I have (7) Not my fault, somebody gave me a whippet, from the midwest they changed their mind about, high strung but settling down as a 2 year old.

July 1, 2014

Forgot to say the guy with 2 chihuahua puppies told me he was rescuing puppies-dogs from Rosarito. I have traveled in Mexico.

July 1, 2014

We adopted our three year old Collin the Collie from Dog Rescue Without Borders, adding to our family and our other collie. Collin was found wondering the streets, I believe in Rosarito. The agency took care of neutering. While we fostered at first, and got his sunburned coat and diet back to normal, who could say no to keeping this pure-bred farm collie. With us only three months, he has since learned to bark in English.

July 3, 2014

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close