Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Perils of the Press

San Diego Reader, July 3, 1996
San Diego Reader, July 3, 1996

Thirty-Five Years Ago
Being the first on the scene will get a newsman his story, but getting a “scoop” is not without its perils. Last Wednesday, the second F-14 fighter in three days went down at Miramar Naval Air Station, and news teams from San Diego’s three television stations beat everyone to the crash site. In this case, their competition for the best film footage ended with their removal from the site and their confinement for several hours at the Miramar security office.
“CITY LIGHTS: “PERILS OF THE PRESS,” Paul Krueger, July 1, 1976

Thirty Years Ago
In a moment of impishness, my oldest son suggested that I have a white business card printed with just a freeform squiggle of red in the middle — to indicate blood. After I finish my meal, my son suggested, I would place the card under my plate. The waiter or waitress would discover it after I’d left. This was his idea of fun.
“THIS MAKES SEVEN,” Eleanor Widmer, July 2, 1981

Twenty-Five Years Ago
For eight months and nearly 200 games (including preseason), the baseball writers for the major daily newspapers are almost constantly in contact with the 24 members of the Padres.... They stay in the same luxury hotels, eat at the same restaurants, drink in the same bars. Unlike football writers, who have no time before games and as little as half an hour after games to interview players, baseball writers are accorded nearly unlimited access.... “That’s the problem between writers and baseball players,” says San Diego Tribune sports writer Barry Bloom. “Writers become part of the fabric of the team, like part of the family. The players see you as part of the team, but you’re not. And then when you write something bad about players, they feel alienated.”
“FOUL TERRITORY,” Stephen Meyer, July 3, 1986

Twenty Years Ago
“When you’re swimming to the deep end of a pool, there’s that point where you reach the dropoff. The bottom of the pool descends beneath you very suddenly. You’re like an aviator. I think it’s the closest to flying I will ever get.” Photographer Suda House swims an hour a day now.

House’s swimming has always been closely connected with her photographic work. The change she notes in the former is paralleled in the latter.
“TINY BUBBLES,” Mary Lang, July 3, 1991

Fifteen Years Ago
I want a lunch-counter cheeseburger, good meat with fried onions, weighty, cooked flat, solid to the grip, with a dense, unaerated bun, sweet as a kiss and solid as a high school girl’s femur. It should be dripping moist, undoctored by garlic powder, cream, or Worcestershire sauce, and crowned for graduation with a mortarboard of yellow American cheese.
“QUICK TO BUY, EASY TO HOLD, CHEAP AND DELICIOUS,” Alexander Theroux, July 3, 1996

Ten Years Ago
On the morning of June 7, at least 25 police officers, social workers, and prosecutors, accompanied by a horde of television and print reporters, rolled out of a police substation in one of the poorest parts of San Diego. Fanning out across the neighborhoods of Paradise Hills, Grant Hill, City Heights, and elsewhere, the carefully orchestrated raid targeted 20 hapless parents who had failed to show up in court to answer for their children’s truancy. This raid was staged by the office of Casey Gwinn, San Diego’s politically ambitious city attorney, with the cooperation of the San Diego Unified School District. Hours later, six mothers were behind bars at county jail.
“HOOKY RAIDS,” Matt Potter, June 28, 2001

Five Years Ago
San Diego mayor Jerry Sanders solemnly promises that he will run an open government, featuring what he calls “transparent decision-making.” But some of his people apparently haven’t gotten the message.

Sanders press aide Fred Sainz circulated an email to some city staffers, making the mayor’s position clear. “To all copied here,” wrote Sainz, “Do not speak with any reporters from the Reader. Tell them that you do not speak with reporters from the Reader. No additional information or follow up necessary. Thanks.”
CITY LIGHTS: “EARTH TO SANDERS,” Matt Potter, June 29, 2006

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Stuck between two cuisines

Sushi vs BBQ
San Diego Reader, July 3, 1996
San Diego Reader, July 3, 1996

Thirty-Five Years Ago
Being the first on the scene will get a newsman his story, but getting a “scoop” is not without its perils. Last Wednesday, the second F-14 fighter in three days went down at Miramar Naval Air Station, and news teams from San Diego’s three television stations beat everyone to the crash site. In this case, their competition for the best film footage ended with their removal from the site and their confinement for several hours at the Miramar security office.
“CITY LIGHTS: “PERILS OF THE PRESS,” Paul Krueger, July 1, 1976

Thirty Years Ago
In a moment of impishness, my oldest son suggested that I have a white business card printed with just a freeform squiggle of red in the middle — to indicate blood. After I finish my meal, my son suggested, I would place the card under my plate. The waiter or waitress would discover it after I’d left. This was his idea of fun.
“THIS MAKES SEVEN,” Eleanor Widmer, July 2, 1981

Twenty-Five Years Ago
For eight months and nearly 200 games (including preseason), the baseball writers for the major daily newspapers are almost constantly in contact with the 24 members of the Padres.... They stay in the same luxury hotels, eat at the same restaurants, drink in the same bars. Unlike football writers, who have no time before games and as little as half an hour after games to interview players, baseball writers are accorded nearly unlimited access.... “That’s the problem between writers and baseball players,” says San Diego Tribune sports writer Barry Bloom. “Writers become part of the fabric of the team, like part of the family. The players see you as part of the team, but you’re not. And then when you write something bad about players, they feel alienated.”
“FOUL TERRITORY,” Stephen Meyer, July 3, 1986

Twenty Years Ago
“When you’re swimming to the deep end of a pool, there’s that point where you reach the dropoff. The bottom of the pool descends beneath you very suddenly. You’re like an aviator. I think it’s the closest to flying I will ever get.” Photographer Suda House swims an hour a day now.

House’s swimming has always been closely connected with her photographic work. The change she notes in the former is paralleled in the latter.
“TINY BUBBLES,” Mary Lang, July 3, 1991

Fifteen Years Ago
I want a lunch-counter cheeseburger, good meat with fried onions, weighty, cooked flat, solid to the grip, with a dense, unaerated bun, sweet as a kiss and solid as a high school girl’s femur. It should be dripping moist, undoctored by garlic powder, cream, or Worcestershire sauce, and crowned for graduation with a mortarboard of yellow American cheese.
“QUICK TO BUY, EASY TO HOLD, CHEAP AND DELICIOUS,” Alexander Theroux, July 3, 1996

Ten Years Ago
On the morning of June 7, at least 25 police officers, social workers, and prosecutors, accompanied by a horde of television and print reporters, rolled out of a police substation in one of the poorest parts of San Diego. Fanning out across the neighborhoods of Paradise Hills, Grant Hill, City Heights, and elsewhere, the carefully orchestrated raid targeted 20 hapless parents who had failed to show up in court to answer for their children’s truancy. This raid was staged by the office of Casey Gwinn, San Diego’s politically ambitious city attorney, with the cooperation of the San Diego Unified School District. Hours later, six mothers were behind bars at county jail.
“HOOKY RAIDS,” Matt Potter, June 28, 2001

Five Years Ago
San Diego mayor Jerry Sanders solemnly promises that he will run an open government, featuring what he calls “transparent decision-making.” But some of his people apparently haven’t gotten the message.

Sanders press aide Fred Sainz circulated an email to some city staffers, making the mayor’s position clear. “To all copied here,” wrote Sainz, “Do not speak with any reporters from the Reader. Tell them that you do not speak with reporters from the Reader. No additional information or follow up necessary. Thanks.”
CITY LIGHTS: “EARTH TO SANDERS,” Matt Potter, June 29, 2006

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Kahlee310’s snitch rapper reactions

“He’d literally do anything for the money or fame”
Next Article

The Tobacconist: Stogie story

His job is to sell pleasure and desire, cigars “hand-rolled tenderly by beautiful women on their thighs.”
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close