4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Social Media in the Workplace

Can you police yourself?

A major frustration with social media is also one of its best attributes: it follows you everywhere. And, that means EVERYWHERE. Technology has made us better connected than ever before, and offers us the opportunity to look up anything we can imagine on a whim, as well as connect with anyone anywhere, but also haunts us when we don’t want it to. It interrupts us at dinner, or when we are at the doctor, or at work. The technology behind social media is developed to have no limits and it forces itself upon each of us.

A new survey from People-OnTheGo reports that social media has invaded the workplace in a major way. People-OnTheGo is a 10-year-old Silicon Valley company formed to study productivity in the digital age. The survey of 1,000 American workers finds that employees are now spending up to four hours a day managing multiple inboxes that include corporate and personal e-mails. They admitted spending one hour a day at work handling social media, including such thing as Linked In, Facebook and Twitter.

Generation Y workers &mdash or those born after 1980 &mdash spend 1.8 hours a day on social media. People-OnTheGo reports that only 6.8 percent of that time spent on social media had anything to do with work. Pierre Khawand, founder and chief executive of People – OnTheGo, believes this signals a new era for our society. “What is perhaps the most concerning issue raised by this study is that most participants check their ‘inboxes’ too often, constantly interrupting their work,” he writes. “Researchers have consistently found that multitasking reduces productivity; tasks can take more than twice as long to complete and can lead to a dramatic increase in errors.”

There is scarcely a person alive who hasn’t responded to a personal e-mail at work, watched a YouTube video that has nothing to do with the job, or spent some amount of on-the-job time making a personal telephone call. This latest survey, however, shows that danger to employers and that this outright thievery of time at work is a bigger issue than many people would have thought.

Khawand suggests that social media’s addictive nature is responsible for some of this abuse. His study found that 23.2 percent of workers admit to constantly checking new information as soon as it arrives and 42.6 percent say they check that information more often than they’d like. Only 34.2 percent of workers thought they were responsible in the way they responded to social media while at work. Somewhere, someone is going to make a lot of money writing books or selling products that tell us we need to behave more prudently at our jobs when it comes to dealing with social media.

So what do we do? Should businesses ban the use of social media in the workplace? The reality is that social media probably has significant benefits for helping businesses perform better, but we’ve yet to quantify exactly how. It’s a new tool for business and tantalizes us with its possibilities. Many businesses now employ social media to cultivate relationships with their customers, collaborate with others or do market research. Those are all important business needs.

No corporate governor is going to successfully monitor how people interact with social media at work. The best solution is for each individual to determine boundaries and acknowledge that work is different than their personal lives. Self-policing will be the best and least offensive way of dealing with this growing intrusion. The only question is how workers themselves will meet this challenge.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

A Fairbanks Ranch estate perched above San Dieguto River Valley

A city estate with a little bit of country
Next Article

A 41-minute Night Parade of One Hundred Demons

Earthless, Heather Nation, Donna Larsen, X-Offenders, Stone Temple Pilots

A major frustration with social media is also one of its best attributes: it follows you everywhere. And, that means EVERYWHERE. Technology has made us better connected than ever before, and offers us the opportunity to look up anything we can imagine on a whim, as well as connect with anyone anywhere, but also haunts us when we don’t want it to. It interrupts us at dinner, or when we are at the doctor, or at work. The technology behind social media is developed to have no limits and it forces itself upon each of us.

A new survey from People-OnTheGo reports that social media has invaded the workplace in a major way. People-OnTheGo is a 10-year-old Silicon Valley company formed to study productivity in the digital age. The survey of 1,000 American workers finds that employees are now spending up to four hours a day managing multiple inboxes that include corporate and personal e-mails. They admitted spending one hour a day at work handling social media, including such thing as Linked In, Facebook and Twitter.

Generation Y workers &mdash or those born after 1980 &mdash spend 1.8 hours a day on social media. People-OnTheGo reports that only 6.8 percent of that time spent on social media had anything to do with work. Pierre Khawand, founder and chief executive of People – OnTheGo, believes this signals a new era for our society. “What is perhaps the most concerning issue raised by this study is that most participants check their ‘inboxes’ too often, constantly interrupting their work,” he writes. “Researchers have consistently found that multitasking reduces productivity; tasks can take more than twice as long to complete and can lead to a dramatic increase in errors.”

There is scarcely a person alive who hasn’t responded to a personal e-mail at work, watched a YouTube video that has nothing to do with the job, or spent some amount of on-the-job time making a personal telephone call. This latest survey, however, shows that danger to employers and that this outright thievery of time at work is a bigger issue than many people would have thought.

Khawand suggests that social media’s addictive nature is responsible for some of this abuse. His study found that 23.2 percent of workers admit to constantly checking new information as soon as it arrives and 42.6 percent say they check that information more often than they’d like. Only 34.2 percent of workers thought they were responsible in the way they responded to social media while at work. Somewhere, someone is going to make a lot of money writing books or selling products that tell us we need to behave more prudently at our jobs when it comes to dealing with social media.

So what do we do? Should businesses ban the use of social media in the workplace? The reality is that social media probably has significant benefits for helping businesses perform better, but we’ve yet to quantify exactly how. It’s a new tool for business and tantalizes us with its possibilities. Many businesses now employ social media to cultivate relationships with their customers, collaborate with others or do market research. Those are all important business needs.

No corporate governor is going to successfully monitor how people interact with social media at work. The best solution is for each individual to determine boundaries and acknowledge that work is different than their personal lives. Self-policing will be the best and least offensive way of dealing with this growing intrusion. The only question is how workers themselves will meet this challenge.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

A5 old fashioned: Wagyu fat-washed bourbon

The essence of the richness of steak
Next Article

Joy Division Unknown Pleasures meets Jack Black from High Fidelity-type character

Run over and scream “SHE’S LOST CONTROL!” into his face
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close