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Letters

Mexico Without Fear

Dear Folks @ the Reader,

I was really glad to see Ed Bedford’s “México” (Cover Story, November 12) expressing the positives of Tijuana and Baja, Mexico. I, too, fell in love with Tijuana after taking kin on touristy shopping trips there years ago. Yes, it is different now. But that big heart is still alive and well.

We are lucky to have such a great country right next door. The food, the color, the history! Wow! My Spanish is minimal. But I have found that most people are warm and friendly and want you to enjoy being there. It’s not just a money thing to Tijuana’s people. They have a genuine love of life! (Here I must add that if you go there and get drunk, abusive, and stupid, you might get a different response.)

I want to mention the Tijuana Wax Museum, an undiscovered gem! It covers Mayans and Aztecs, political figures, folklore, and even some American celebrities. And the mystery of Juan Soldado. It’s affordable and close to the entrance to the Tijuana shopping district. And it’s worth making a special trip to see!

I say, don’t be afraid of Mexico.

Holly Sandy
University Heights

Baja Allure

Re “México” (Cover Story, November 12).

This is by far the best article from any local-type publication I have ever read, and one of the better articles I’ve read in general. The author, though more versed in the Baja region than myself, captured the essence and allure of the region as experienced by an outsider, a gringo. I guess I feel so strongly because I used to go down there almost every Friday for two years (when I was between the ages of 17 and 19), and not only to get drunk.

During those two years and after, I really appreciated what Mexico has to offer, and I’ve made a lot of good friends. The cuisine, the culture, the people, the attitude, the sights (no matter how destitute), and, of course, the good times. It really inspired me to learn more about the area (not necessarily in a scholastic fashion) and to acquaint myself with Spanish-speaking beyond the three years I took in school.

The sense of humor is unparalleled, considering TJ is/was the melting pot of Mexico in terms of its residents relocating; so you get to experience the quick talking of the chilangos, all the entertaining slang they use, and just the general good-natured spirit of the people. The people are always so warm and receptive, a very charitable bunch beyond the monetary sense, and all around very pleasant.

In fact, I really appreciate the people and the culture down there more than my own, because, well, the U.S. completely lacks a distinct/ identifying/unifying culture. Despite the woes of its government, Mexico has a lot to offer in many ways; I’ve always learned something (bad or good) when I’ve come back from a TJ experience, and it’s always for the better. It can be very humbling at times.

I really miss going down there; it’s been close to nine months since I took my last expedition. Times are hard everywhere, and even though TJ is cheap, I would still normally spend the same amount down there as I would on an outing in San Diego, given there was more bang for the buck, so to speak. Tijuana, I miss you. ¡Viva Baja!

El Gabacho (Borracho)
via email

Oh, I Get It

Re “East Village Lowdown,” “City Lights,” November 12.

Now I finally understand the big push to get the new central library built. Our downtown shakers and movers have convinced themselves it will save the East Village. Wasn’t that what the ballpark was going to do? It’s only costing taxpayers $10 million annually in debt service. You have to wonder how much the library will add to that.

Bill Bradshaw
Mission Beach

It Was Just A Sneaky Plot

The East Village area will recover slowly as the recession fades away and people move in to occupy those empty condos (“East Village Lowdown,” “City Lights,” November 12). And then, if Alex Spanos and Mayor Sanders have their way, the choice of the Petco “tailgate” parking lot as a location for a new Chargers stadium will destroy East Village as a pleasant place to live and/or do business.

It turns out, predictably, that Mayor Sanders and the crafty Alex Spanos never had any intention of considering anywhere but downtown San Diego. The skillfully choreographed dance through pretended alternatives was the usual sham attempt to disguise the fact that a decision had already been made at lunches and other private social venues.

A Google satellite picture of the Qualcomm site taken on an NFL game day will show the many thousands of cars that would have to fit into the MTS/Petco area during a game. How about that inevitable day when a Chargers game and a Padres game are scheduled for the same day? Now, suppose that the convention center is hosting a major gathering, the new library is having a busy day, two or three cruise ships are in port, and tourists are thronging around the Gaslamp Quarter. What if there happens to be a major accident or fire in that area? Any chance that an emergency vehicle could get through? Any chance that a resident could get in or out?

While you have your Google satellite map handy, be sure to compare major highway access to both the Qualcomm and Petco locations.

Should it happen that the voters do get conned into building a downtown stadium for Mr. Spanos and the Chargers, let’s demand that the facility be constructed with something akin to oversized Lego blocks. Since Sanders and Spanos agree that major concrete structures such as stadiums and civic buildings have a useful life of no more than 40 years (tell that to the Romans), it would save lots of demolition expense when the stadium is abandoned.

Lyle Davidson
via email

Link Broken

There is a factual error in Mr. Leighton’s story (“Buck Howdy’s on the Case,” “Blurt,” November 12). There is not now, nor has there ever been, a RecallRexford.com link on the BuckHowdy.com website.

There was and is a RecallRexford.com link on SteveVaus.com, as I told him when I was interviewed for the story.

I would appreciate a correction.

Steve Vaus
via email

Ken Leighton responds: Mr. Vaus is correct, and I regret the error.

Real Reality

William Sladack’s letter (“String ’Em Up,” November 12) says nice things about Don Bauder that I agree with. Other than that, “Stringers” does not warrant such criticism, as it is real news written by real people, not “fake” news written by media propagandists. The whole idea is to publish stories of interest to only one neighborhood. Regarding his mention of hedonism, that’s the one thing that makes the world not hell. Has he ever considered publishing his own newspaper? Then reporters can be forced to write whatever he wants. Too much of that already in San Diego and worldwide. Not enough real news stringers.

John Kitchin
via email

A Snob To The Core

Madam Barbarella,

Top ten reasons you are a snob.

You assume in “Wine Snobs” (“Diary of a Diva,” November 12) that one can be snobbish about one thing (in this case wine) yet not be snobbish in all things. I disagree.

If a person is an insufferable, arrogant, pontificating ass, it is an intrinsic condition that manifests in all matters of opinion or discussion.

Your friend Andrew was dead-on: “Snobs are people who take things too seriously.” May I add, especially themselves.

Your friend Kelly also hit the mark, “Snobs are easy to spot because they feel compelled to impart their knowledge on the uneducated.”

Note that neither of them restricted their comments to any single focus of human interest.

You conclude after faulty rationalization that you and David are not snobs… (Not that there’s anything wrong with that!)

I propose, therefore, to put your claimed salt-of-the-earth status to the following test. In it, I tried to emphasize wine, since that was the original topic, but I also felt free to draw upon other comments from your article as seemed appropriate and germane. So here we go: the top ten reasons you may be a snob.

You are a snob if you:

1. Own any wine accessory other than a common corkscrew.

2. Read/memorize droll things to say about a wine, generally imputing human-character traits, e.g., bold, impudent, cheeky, etc.

3. Use the word “bouquet” when describing a wine. In fact, you’re a snob if you ever feel the need to describe a wine with more than “Good,” “Mmmm,” or a nod of the head.

4. Eschew Two Buck Chuck. How gauche!! Never mind the fact that it’s won several prestigious blind taste-test awards.

5. Make a big deal in restaurants about testing cork, color, nose, legs, you name it. Of course, sending a bottle back is prima facie evidence of snobbery (boorishness).

6. Know the sommelier’s (suhm-uhl-YEY) cup is a tastevin (tahst-VAHN).

7. Memorize the above factoids (including pronunciation) to dazzle the ignorant at some later opportunity.

8. Feel immensely superior to anyone having high school education or less.

9. Ditto the poor dumb bastards in the Red States.

10. Refer to yourself as a diva.

Madam, I rest my case. You and David are snobs of the first order.

Cheers,

E. Dunne
via email

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Mexico Without Fear

Dear Folks @ the Reader,

I was really glad to see Ed Bedford’s “México” (Cover Story, November 12) expressing the positives of Tijuana and Baja, Mexico. I, too, fell in love with Tijuana after taking kin on touristy shopping trips there years ago. Yes, it is different now. But that big heart is still alive and well.

We are lucky to have such a great country right next door. The food, the color, the history! Wow! My Spanish is minimal. But I have found that most people are warm and friendly and want you to enjoy being there. It’s not just a money thing to Tijuana’s people. They have a genuine love of life! (Here I must add that if you go there and get drunk, abusive, and stupid, you might get a different response.)

I want to mention the Tijuana Wax Museum, an undiscovered gem! It covers Mayans and Aztecs, political figures, folklore, and even some American celebrities. And the mystery of Juan Soldado. It’s affordable and close to the entrance to the Tijuana shopping district. And it’s worth making a special trip to see!

I say, don’t be afraid of Mexico.

Holly Sandy
University Heights

Baja Allure

Re “México” (Cover Story, November 12).

This is by far the best article from any local-type publication I have ever read, and one of the better articles I’ve read in general. The author, though more versed in the Baja region than myself, captured the essence and allure of the region as experienced by an outsider, a gringo. I guess I feel so strongly because I used to go down there almost every Friday for two years (when I was between the ages of 17 and 19), and not only to get drunk.

During those two years and after, I really appreciated what Mexico has to offer, and I’ve made a lot of good friends. The cuisine, the culture, the people, the attitude, the sights (no matter how destitute), and, of course, the good times. It really inspired me to learn more about the area (not necessarily in a scholastic fashion) and to acquaint myself with Spanish-speaking beyond the three years I took in school.

The sense of humor is unparalleled, considering TJ is/was the melting pot of Mexico in terms of its residents relocating; so you get to experience the quick talking of the chilangos, all the entertaining slang they use, and just the general good-natured spirit of the people. The people are always so warm and receptive, a very charitable bunch beyond the monetary sense, and all around very pleasant.

In fact, I really appreciate the people and the culture down there more than my own, because, well, the U.S. completely lacks a distinct/ identifying/unifying culture. Despite the woes of its government, Mexico has a lot to offer in many ways; I’ve always learned something (bad or good) when I’ve come back from a TJ experience, and it’s always for the better. It can be very humbling at times.

I really miss going down there; it’s been close to nine months since I took my last expedition. Times are hard everywhere, and even though TJ is cheap, I would still normally spend the same amount down there as I would on an outing in San Diego, given there was more bang for the buck, so to speak. Tijuana, I miss you. ¡Viva Baja!

El Gabacho (Borracho)
via email

Oh, I Get It

Re “East Village Lowdown,” “City Lights,” November 12.

Now I finally understand the big push to get the new central library built. Our downtown shakers and movers have convinced themselves it will save the East Village. Wasn’t that what the ballpark was going to do? It’s only costing taxpayers $10 million annually in debt service. You have to wonder how much the library will add to that.

Bill Bradshaw
Mission Beach

It Was Just A Sneaky Plot

The East Village area will recover slowly as the recession fades away and people move in to occupy those empty condos (“East Village Lowdown,” “City Lights,” November 12). And then, if Alex Spanos and Mayor Sanders have their way, the choice of the Petco “tailgate” parking lot as a location for a new Chargers stadium will destroy East Village as a pleasant place to live and/or do business.

It turns out, predictably, that Mayor Sanders and the crafty Alex Spanos never had any intention of considering anywhere but downtown San Diego. The skillfully choreographed dance through pretended alternatives was the usual sham attempt to disguise the fact that a decision had already been made at lunches and other private social venues.

A Google satellite picture of the Qualcomm site taken on an NFL game day will show the many thousands of cars that would have to fit into the MTS/Petco area during a game. How about that inevitable day when a Chargers game and a Padres game are scheduled for the same day? Now, suppose that the convention center is hosting a major gathering, the new library is having a busy day, two or three cruise ships are in port, and tourists are thronging around the Gaslamp Quarter. What if there happens to be a major accident or fire in that area? Any chance that an emergency vehicle could get through? Any chance that a resident could get in or out?

While you have your Google satellite map handy, be sure to compare major highway access to both the Qualcomm and Petco locations.

Should it happen that the voters do get conned into building a downtown stadium for Mr. Spanos and the Chargers, let’s demand that the facility be constructed with something akin to oversized Lego blocks. Since Sanders and Spanos agree that major concrete structures such as stadiums and civic buildings have a useful life of no more than 40 years (tell that to the Romans), it would save lots of demolition expense when the stadium is abandoned.

Lyle Davidson
via email

Link Broken

There is a factual error in Mr. Leighton’s story (“Buck Howdy’s on the Case,” “Blurt,” November 12). There is not now, nor has there ever been, a RecallRexford.com link on the BuckHowdy.com website.

There was and is a RecallRexford.com link on SteveVaus.com, as I told him when I was interviewed for the story.

I would appreciate a correction.

Steve Vaus
via email

Ken Leighton responds: Mr. Vaus is correct, and I regret the error.

Real Reality

William Sladack’s letter (“String ’Em Up,” November 12) says nice things about Don Bauder that I agree with. Other than that, “Stringers” does not warrant such criticism, as it is real news written by real people, not “fake” news written by media propagandists. The whole idea is to publish stories of interest to only one neighborhood. Regarding his mention of hedonism, that’s the one thing that makes the world not hell. Has he ever considered publishing his own newspaper? Then reporters can be forced to write whatever he wants. Too much of that already in San Diego and worldwide. Not enough real news stringers.

John Kitchin
via email

A Snob To The Core

Madam Barbarella,

Top ten reasons you are a snob.

You assume in “Wine Snobs” (“Diary of a Diva,” November 12) that one can be snobbish about one thing (in this case wine) yet not be snobbish in all things. I disagree.

If a person is an insufferable, arrogant, pontificating ass, it is an intrinsic condition that manifests in all matters of opinion or discussion.

Your friend Andrew was dead-on: “Snobs are people who take things too seriously.” May I add, especially themselves.

Your friend Kelly also hit the mark, “Snobs are easy to spot because they feel compelled to impart their knowledge on the uneducated.”

Note that neither of them restricted their comments to any single focus of human interest.

You conclude after faulty rationalization that you and David are not snobs… (Not that there’s anything wrong with that!)

I propose, therefore, to put your claimed salt-of-the-earth status to the following test. In it, I tried to emphasize wine, since that was the original topic, but I also felt free to draw upon other comments from your article as seemed appropriate and germane. So here we go: the top ten reasons you may be a snob.

You are a snob if you:

1. Own any wine accessory other than a common corkscrew.

2. Read/memorize droll things to say about a wine, generally imputing human-character traits, e.g., bold, impudent, cheeky, etc.

3. Use the word “bouquet” when describing a wine. In fact, you’re a snob if you ever feel the need to describe a wine with more than “Good,” “Mmmm,” or a nod of the head.

4. Eschew Two Buck Chuck. How gauche!! Never mind the fact that it’s won several prestigious blind taste-test awards.

5. Make a big deal in restaurants about testing cork, color, nose, legs, you name it. Of course, sending a bottle back is prima facie evidence of snobbery (boorishness).

6. Know the sommelier’s (suhm-uhl-YEY) cup is a tastevin (tahst-VAHN).

7. Memorize the above factoids (including pronunciation) to dazzle the ignorant at some later opportunity.

8. Feel immensely superior to anyone having high school education or less.

9. Ditto the poor dumb bastards in the Red States.

10. Refer to yourself as a diva.

Madam, I rest my case. You and David are snobs of the first order.

Cheers,

E. Dunne
via email

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Comments
6

For years I have enjoyed Ed Bedford’s writing in the Tin Fork column. His story “México” (Cover Story, November 12) shared his wonderful talent as a writer and story teller. I hope we are treated to more feature stories from Ed.

Nov. 19, 2009

it is a well known fact already that barb and david are snobs. your point? no offense barb and david...i know you like it that way :)

Nov. 19, 2009

magics, I think the irony here is that this person is doing exactly what s/he abhors, arrogantly forcing on us THE definition of a snob in ten-point style. I think the whole thing is really tongue-in-cheek.

Anway, it's pretty banal to use "bouquet" when discussing a wine, and knowing that the sommelier's cup has a name in French--who cares? It's a random fact that doesn't go far.

"Two Buck Chuck" might have won a taste test or two, but who can evaluate that swill from case to case, as it is completely inconsistent? Fred Franzia just dumps any grapes he can buy at discount into the pot, and whatever comes out ends up being the 'Two Buck' blend.

E. Dunne does have a point, already made by folk in Barb's column--a person who FORCES his/her superior knowledge on others without being open for discussion, or attempting to create conversation--that is, someone who cannot interact or take in new information him/herself, but just lectures to others, comes closer to the definition of a snob than someone who knows a few facts about wine, and is ready to share them in a conversation about wine. As I wrote in Barbs' column, it is only when someone uses knowledge to intimidate others that we are dealing with a negative situation--anyone who is automatically intimidated and angered by someone imparting information might be called a 'putz' ;)

Nov. 19, 2009

i know...i meant it in a most good natured way :)i know NOTHING about wine...you know how much i hate it lol...

Nov. 19, 2009

vodka and cran coming right up, ma'am! ;)

Nov. 19, 2009

;) nothin like a friend who really knows you :)

Nov. 19, 2009

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