Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, Fear and Loathing

Mauricio Chernovetsky
Director, Cassandra

To someone who’s a fan of long, contemplative takes and abstract narrative techniques, Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Syndromes and a Century really delivers! But what’s most refreshing is the lightness and humor the director manages to infuse into a story that deals with memory. I’m still mesmerized by his exquisite compositions.

The next film is Lucrecia Martel’s La Ciénaga, about the life of two women and their families in the small provincial town of Salta, Argentina. Martel’s a master at conveying mood and a sense of place. Like Weerasethakul, Martel is forging a cinematic language that’s all her own. Watching her films is like being honored to take part in a conversation with someone who’s more insightful and thoughtful than I can ever hope to be.

Syndromes and a Century
(Thailand) 2006, Strand Releasing

La Cienaga
(Argentina) 2001, Homevision

David Niebla
Music video director, Tijuana Bass and Tengo La Voz

As a local filmmaker with films screening March 12 at the San Diego Latino Film Festival, I’d like to share a few of my influences and inspirations: David Lynch’s masterpiece, Lost Highway. Underrated, it represents all that a great film should have: suspense, amazing plot, and excellent cinematography. It’s one of the most visually poetic films I’ve seen.

Lynch’s film-noir style has been an enormous inspiration. But my second pick, Mulholland Drive, demonstrates how non-linear storytelling can be taken to the next level. With its multilayered plot and eccentric twists and turns, this movie’s a must for any aspiring filmmaker. After watching it 50 times, interesting gaps still remain.

My final pick is Terry Gilliam’s ferociously visual Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Gilliam takes the already surrealistic scenarios of Las Vegas and launches them into another dimension.

Lost Highway
(USA) 2001, Universal

Mulholland Dr.
(USA) 2002, Universal

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
(USA) 1998, Criterion

Patric Stillman
Curator, San Diego Latino Film Festival

In 15 years at the festival, I’ve seen Latino cinema push the boundaries of storytelling. Recently, I enjoyed how the quick-paced Ladron Que Roba A Ladron stirred up the standard American heist film and made it uniquely Mexican. Raul Mendez (who stars in Kilometro 31 at this year’s festival) helps make the film thoroughly enjoyable.

Niñas Mal could be dismissed as another rebellious teen comedy, but it brings depth to the characters by exposing very real class struggles. Much-loved actress Martha Higareda (who presents two films at SDLFF) dazzles the camera.

Finally, a real genre twister that combines women wrestlers, monsters, and mad doctors! You can’t help but fall in love with the stunning former Miss Mexico Lorena Velazquez in top form in the ’60s cult classic Las Luchadoras Contra la Momia. I can’t wait for the special tribute for her at this year’s festival.

Ladron Que Roba A Ladron (Wide Screen)
(Mexico) 2007, Lionsgate

Niñas Mal (Charm School) [NTSC/REGION 4 DVD. Import-Latin America]
(Mexico) 2007, Columbia/TriStar

Las Luchadoras Contra La Momia
(Mexico) 1964, Image Entertainment

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Imagine a pedestrian-friendly Kearny Mesa

Hard to consider history in 30-year plan
Next Article

North Park – the prime quartier

30th Street parking, Georgia Street bridge, PSA crash, water tower, North Park Main Street

Mauricio Chernovetsky
Director, Cassandra

To someone who’s a fan of long, contemplative takes and abstract narrative techniques, Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Syndromes and a Century really delivers! But what’s most refreshing is the lightness and humor the director manages to infuse into a story that deals with memory. I’m still mesmerized by his exquisite compositions.

The next film is Lucrecia Martel’s La Ciénaga, about the life of two women and their families in the small provincial town of Salta, Argentina. Martel’s a master at conveying mood and a sense of place. Like Weerasethakul, Martel is forging a cinematic language that’s all her own. Watching her films is like being honored to take part in a conversation with someone who’s more insightful and thoughtful than I can ever hope to be.

Syndromes and a Century
(Thailand) 2006, Strand Releasing

La Cienaga
(Argentina) 2001, Homevision

David Niebla
Music video director, Tijuana Bass and Tengo La Voz

As a local filmmaker with films screening March 12 at the San Diego Latino Film Festival, I’d like to share a few of my influences and inspirations: David Lynch’s masterpiece, Lost Highway. Underrated, it represents all that a great film should have: suspense, amazing plot, and excellent cinematography. It’s one of the most visually poetic films I’ve seen.

Lynch’s film-noir style has been an enormous inspiration. But my second pick, Mulholland Drive, demonstrates how non-linear storytelling can be taken to the next level. With its multilayered plot and eccentric twists and turns, this movie’s a must for any aspiring filmmaker. After watching it 50 times, interesting gaps still remain.

My final pick is Terry Gilliam’s ferociously visual Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Gilliam takes the already surrealistic scenarios of Las Vegas and launches them into another dimension.

Lost Highway
(USA) 2001, Universal

Mulholland Dr.
(USA) 2002, Universal

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
(USA) 1998, Criterion

Patric Stillman
Curator, San Diego Latino Film Festival

In 15 years at the festival, I’ve seen Latino cinema push the boundaries of storytelling. Recently, I enjoyed how the quick-paced Ladron Que Roba A Ladron stirred up the standard American heist film and made it uniquely Mexican. Raul Mendez (who stars in Kilometro 31 at this year’s festival) helps make the film thoroughly enjoyable.

Niñas Mal could be dismissed as another rebellious teen comedy, but it brings depth to the characters by exposing very real class struggles. Much-loved actress Martha Higareda (who presents two films at SDLFF) dazzles the camera.

Finally, a real genre twister that combines women wrestlers, monsters, and mad doctors! You can’t help but fall in love with the stunning former Miss Mexico Lorena Velazquez in top form in the ’60s cult classic Las Luchadoras Contra la Momia. I can’t wait for the special tribute for her at this year’s festival.

Ladron Que Roba A Ladron (Wide Screen)
(Mexico) 2007, Lionsgate

Niñas Mal (Charm School) [NTSC/REGION 4 DVD. Import-Latin America]
(Mexico) 2007, Columbia/TriStar

Las Luchadoras Contra La Momia
(Mexico) 1964, Image Entertainment

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Poppin’ Padres petition for permanent props in stands

The Crowd Goes Mild!
Next Article

Terra Lawson-Remer out-raises Kristin Gaspar

San Diego State not ready for emergency
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close