Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Ridout Plastics — beyond Preisendorfer surfboards

"Maybe The Graduate planted a seed"

From Ridout site. Ridout Plastics has grown from 8 to over 65 employees.
From Ridout site. Ridout Plastics has grown from 8 to over 65 employees.

Its influence was not as far-reaching as Oprah’s Book Club, but its consequences were likely far more devastating. Though we smirk at its mass appeal and its seeming insincerity, all Oprah’s list does is make more people read. But Jaclyn Easton’s book and associated website, StrikingltRich.com, surely lured thousands of brash entrepreneurs onto the Web rocks, ending in their humiliating but captivating bankruptcies.

Easton is a popular tech columnist for the Los Angeles Times and a frequent guest commentator on the 7:00 p.m. entertainment-television circuit. She published StrikingItRich.com in 1999, before the Web wipeout. The book profiles 23 “incredibly successful websites you’ve probably never heard of.” Easton’s purpose was to prove that the Web could be profitable for small businesses, not just the giants. To that end, she described the Internet successes of such unglamorous companies as Long Island Hot Tubs, Coastal Tool and Supply, KoreaLink, and Motorcycle Online. She demonstrated, above all, that obsessive customer service was the key to a profitable website. One of the better examples she chose was the commerce site of Ridout Plastics (www.ridoutplastics.com), a San Diego company located on Ruffin Road, just east of Montgomery Field.

“Elliott Rabin’s $8000 website,” Easton explained, “paid for itself with its first customer.” She quoted Rabin, “This client wanted to move his company to San Diego. So he went to a search engine, punched in‘San Diego and plastics,’and our name came back at the top of the list. After seeing the manufacturing pages on our website, he called me up and — boom — a $100,000-a-year account. Thank you.”

Ridout Plastics’ site states, “Our Core Competency is the ability to take plastic and then modify, enhance, and decorate its shape to provide your solution—quickly and accurately.” Rabin’s online biography reads like a typical American Dream cliche.“I am a San Diego native,” he writes, “and graduated from UC San Diego earning a degree in Visual Arts (Art History) with Honors. I have an MBA in Financial Management. I have been playing on computers since the early Atari games.... From an early age, I knew that plastics would be my occupation. Maybe it was The Graduate that planted a seed, but I found a career paper written in the ninth grade detailing my desire to join the family plastics business. The warehouse and manufacturing facilities at Ridout Plastics were a paradise as a teenager where I learned about the varieties of plastics sold. As an avid surfer, I was pleased to find the raw materials necessary to build surfboards on the shelves of the family store. By the time I graduated from college, I built over 500 top-quality surfboards with my old friend, R.W. Preisendorfer. Upon college graduation I was faced with four paths; (1) join my father, (2) expand the surfboard business as a full-time career, (3) pursue a Master’s Degree in Art History at Yale University, or (4) move to Kauai, grow avocados, and surf.

“Well, I guess the rest is‘history,’ as they say. Ridout Plastics has grown from 8 to over 65 employees, from 5000 square feet of space to over 50,000 square feet of combined manufacturing and office space.... How many company owners can walk around their company each day and be absolutely amazed at what is being made? The solutions we provide, and the care put into each order by our employees, is one of the most rewarding things you’ll ever see.

The U.S. Government awarded us the prestigious Family Business of the Year in 1995 as a result.”

Ridout Plastics manufactures all kinds of plastic products for industries and individuals. They fill custom orders for tanks, trophy cases, podiums, lecterns, custom furniture, biotech supplies, and museum display cases. Rabin explains at the site, “We stock and sell only the finest-quality products for lasting solutions. All materials can be cut and shaped to the customer’s exact requirements. Products are exported to Baja California, Brazil, France, Canada, Japan, Australia, Chile, and other countries. Engineering plastics supplied by us were on-board the lunar landing program (and remain on the moon).”Customers can fax blueprints to Ridout, which will then take the designs and see them from prototype to product. “The company has invested in state-of-the-art equipment for exacting tolerance control in today’s zero-defect environment. From handcrafted fabrication to full-production extrusion and injection-molding — we do it all.”

One of Easton’s primary lessons is that, contrary to popular opinion, “content” is not the kiss of death. So long as a site provides a clearly stated service, it can load up on content and still succeed. Rid-ouLcom serves as a fine example of this precept. A client can visit the site to order a custom-made skateboard or an oddly shaped piece of plastic tubing and receive as a bonus an education in the expansion and contraction properties of Plexiglas (acrylic).“For indoor applications where temperatures normally remain the same (+/- 20 degrees F),” the site’s FAQ page explains, “acrylic sheet does not generally require special considerations for expansion and contraction, other than providing for a snug rather than tight fit since its movement is approximately .00984 in. per foot length for each 20 degrees of temperature change.”

Q. There were plastics in 1914?

“Do you remember the little plastic numbers and letters on grocery shelves (that you used to switch around)? Originally founded as the Rench Company in downtown San Diego in 1914, that’s how we got our start. In fact, the owner’s grandfather and father used to buy their store supplies from the Rench Company in the 1930s. But, for a nice and informative overview of plastics, specifically Plexiglas, click here for the Plexiglas Primer!”

Nothing fancy, but as recent economic developments have demonstrated, probably the formula of the future for websites. As Rabin told Easton in 1999,“Every day I am totally blown away that people out there find us and want to do business with us."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Morgan Freeman as an extraterrestrial diplomat

You know the aliens have seen The Shawshank Redemption
Next Article

North Park – the prime quartier

30th Street parking, Georgia Street bridge, PSA crash, water tower, North Park Main Street
From Ridout site. Ridout Plastics has grown from 8 to over 65 employees.
From Ridout site. Ridout Plastics has grown from 8 to over 65 employees.

Its influence was not as far-reaching as Oprah’s Book Club, but its consequences were likely far more devastating. Though we smirk at its mass appeal and its seeming insincerity, all Oprah’s list does is make more people read. But Jaclyn Easton’s book and associated website, StrikingltRich.com, surely lured thousands of brash entrepreneurs onto the Web rocks, ending in their humiliating but captivating bankruptcies.

Easton is a popular tech columnist for the Los Angeles Times and a frequent guest commentator on the 7:00 p.m. entertainment-television circuit. She published StrikingItRich.com in 1999, before the Web wipeout. The book profiles 23 “incredibly successful websites you’ve probably never heard of.” Easton’s purpose was to prove that the Web could be profitable for small businesses, not just the giants. To that end, she described the Internet successes of such unglamorous companies as Long Island Hot Tubs, Coastal Tool and Supply, KoreaLink, and Motorcycle Online. She demonstrated, above all, that obsessive customer service was the key to a profitable website. One of the better examples she chose was the commerce site of Ridout Plastics (www.ridoutplastics.com), a San Diego company located on Ruffin Road, just east of Montgomery Field.

“Elliott Rabin’s $8000 website,” Easton explained, “paid for itself with its first customer.” She quoted Rabin, “This client wanted to move his company to San Diego. So he went to a search engine, punched in‘San Diego and plastics,’and our name came back at the top of the list. After seeing the manufacturing pages on our website, he called me up and — boom — a $100,000-a-year account. Thank you.”

Ridout Plastics’ site states, “Our Core Competency is the ability to take plastic and then modify, enhance, and decorate its shape to provide your solution—quickly and accurately.” Rabin’s online biography reads like a typical American Dream cliche.“I am a San Diego native,” he writes, “and graduated from UC San Diego earning a degree in Visual Arts (Art History) with Honors. I have an MBA in Financial Management. I have been playing on computers since the early Atari games.... From an early age, I knew that plastics would be my occupation. Maybe it was The Graduate that planted a seed, but I found a career paper written in the ninth grade detailing my desire to join the family plastics business. The warehouse and manufacturing facilities at Ridout Plastics were a paradise as a teenager where I learned about the varieties of plastics sold. As an avid surfer, I was pleased to find the raw materials necessary to build surfboards on the shelves of the family store. By the time I graduated from college, I built over 500 top-quality surfboards with my old friend, R.W. Preisendorfer. Upon college graduation I was faced with four paths; (1) join my father, (2) expand the surfboard business as a full-time career, (3) pursue a Master’s Degree in Art History at Yale University, or (4) move to Kauai, grow avocados, and surf.

“Well, I guess the rest is‘history,’ as they say. Ridout Plastics has grown from 8 to over 65 employees, from 5000 square feet of space to over 50,000 square feet of combined manufacturing and office space.... How many company owners can walk around their company each day and be absolutely amazed at what is being made? The solutions we provide, and the care put into each order by our employees, is one of the most rewarding things you’ll ever see.

The U.S. Government awarded us the prestigious Family Business of the Year in 1995 as a result.”

Ridout Plastics manufactures all kinds of plastic products for industries and individuals. They fill custom orders for tanks, trophy cases, podiums, lecterns, custom furniture, biotech supplies, and museum display cases. Rabin explains at the site, “We stock and sell only the finest-quality products for lasting solutions. All materials can be cut and shaped to the customer’s exact requirements. Products are exported to Baja California, Brazil, France, Canada, Japan, Australia, Chile, and other countries. Engineering plastics supplied by us were on-board the lunar landing program (and remain on the moon).”Customers can fax blueprints to Ridout, which will then take the designs and see them from prototype to product. “The company has invested in state-of-the-art equipment for exacting tolerance control in today’s zero-defect environment. From handcrafted fabrication to full-production extrusion and injection-molding — we do it all.”

One of Easton’s primary lessons is that, contrary to popular opinion, “content” is not the kiss of death. So long as a site provides a clearly stated service, it can load up on content and still succeed. Rid-ouLcom serves as a fine example of this precept. A client can visit the site to order a custom-made skateboard or an oddly shaped piece of plastic tubing and receive as a bonus an education in the expansion and contraction properties of Plexiglas (acrylic).“For indoor applications where temperatures normally remain the same (+/- 20 degrees F),” the site’s FAQ page explains, “acrylic sheet does not generally require special considerations for expansion and contraction, other than providing for a snug rather than tight fit since its movement is approximately .00984 in. per foot length for each 20 degrees of temperature change.”

Q. There were plastics in 1914?

“Do you remember the little plastic numbers and letters on grocery shelves (that you used to switch around)? Originally founded as the Rench Company in downtown San Diego in 1914, that’s how we got our start. In fact, the owner’s grandfather and father used to buy their store supplies from the Rench Company in the 1930s. But, for a nice and informative overview of plastics, specifically Plexiglas, click here for the Plexiglas Primer!”

Nothing fancy, but as recent economic developments have demonstrated, probably the formula of the future for websites. As Rabin told Easton in 1999,“Every day I am totally blown away that people out there find us and want to do business with us."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Immigrants flock to San Diego

Indian-Americans, Casa Cornelia, Border Angels, Somalis, Vietnamese in Linda Vista
Next Article

Thai Joints rule in the Heights

Pick up or delivery, Thai fans have it good on Adams Avenue
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close