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Economic Survey Finds Plurality of Californians Supportive of Occupy

Support for the Occupy Wall Street movement remains higher than its opposition, a statewide survey that primarily focused on Californians’ view of government released yesterday by the Public Policy Institute of California reports.

State residents are more likely to support than oppose Occupy by a margin of 46 percent to 37 percent, numbers roughly comparable to a national ABC News/Washington Post poll that found 44 percent of Americans supporting and 41 percent opposed. The California numbers include 59 percent of Democrats in favor, and 61 percent of Republicans in opposition. Those who identified as political independents trend slightly against favoring the movement. Overall, Occupy enjoys a slightly stronger support among those likely to vote in the next election, with 49 percent saying they either strongly favor or somewhat favor the group.

The Tea Party, however, doesn’t enjoy the same support in either California or nationwide. 53 percent of likely voters in the state are either somewhat or strongly opposed to that movement’s message, while 39 percent of voters approve. Nationwide the gap is closer, with 43 percent supportive and 44 percent in opposition.

Californians of all stripes, however, can band together in their distaste for Wall Street – 51 percent of likely voters, including 57 percent of Democrats and 51 percent of Republicans, believe Wall Street does more to hurt the economy than to help it. There is, however, one group that believes corporate actions benefit America as a whole – those making $80,000 or more per year. Even then Wall Street found only 46 percent in support of its activities, versus 45 percent opposed.

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Support for the Occupy Wall Street movement remains higher than its opposition, a statewide survey that primarily focused on Californians’ view of government released yesterday by the Public Policy Institute of California reports.

State residents are more likely to support than oppose Occupy by a margin of 46 percent to 37 percent, numbers roughly comparable to a national ABC News/Washington Post poll that found 44 percent of Americans supporting and 41 percent opposed. The California numbers include 59 percent of Democrats in favor, and 61 percent of Republicans in opposition. Those who identified as political independents trend slightly against favoring the movement. Overall, Occupy enjoys a slightly stronger support among those likely to vote in the next election, with 49 percent saying they either strongly favor or somewhat favor the group.

The Tea Party, however, doesn’t enjoy the same support in either California or nationwide. 53 percent of likely voters in the state are either somewhat or strongly opposed to that movement’s message, while 39 percent of voters approve. Nationwide the gap is closer, with 43 percent supportive and 44 percent in opposition.

Californians of all stripes, however, can band together in their distaste for Wall Street – 51 percent of likely voters, including 57 percent of Democrats and 51 percent of Republicans, believe Wall Street does more to hurt the economy than to help it. There is, however, one group that believes corporate actions benefit America as a whole – those making $80,000 or more per year. Even then Wall Street found only 46 percent in support of its activities, versus 45 percent opposed.

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Comments
4

Subtext: Many Americans still believe the version of events presented by the mainstream media -- in this case, occupy = good, tea party = bad.

Dec. 13, 2011

Or maybe it's just that the Occupy message about income equality appeals to more people than the Tea Party's message about too much government.

Dec. 15, 2011

I was dismissive of the Occupy movement, until the kids got pepper sprayed at UC Davis. My daughter is a sophomore there, and this event hit close to home. The UC students/protesters/occupiers have a legitimate beef. The university has been cutting student services, tuition/fees continually increase and the Governor recently announced more mid-year cuts to education, even as UC executives were recently awarded massive salary increases. There is something wrong here. Furthermore, employment prospects for these kids are not hopeful. Many would-be retirees are holding onto their jobs out of fear or because their retirement funds evaporated in the financial meltdown. The best bet for recovery is to fund education, so the next generation will have the necessities for digging out of the hole our generation created. Oh, and by the way, statewide redevelopment gets 40% of its funding - that’s $2 billion annually – by siphoning money away from education. If Governor Brown has done anything right, it is going after redevelopment.

Dec. 14, 2011

Indeed, that UC Davis footage was perhaps the most important video shot this year. It got the attention of millions.

Dec. 15, 2011

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