4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Castellanos & The Legends Live in P.B.

None

McPherson, Castellanos & Lowe by TOM HARTEN

A capacity house was on hand to celebrate trumpeter Gilbert Castellanos and his hand-picked San Diego Jazz Legends at Tango Del Rey last night.

Featuring as many as eight musicians sharing the stage at one time is an inherently tricky affair--especially when the ages of the musicians involved span from the mid-twenties to the early nineties. Everyone is a bandleader in their own right--so there was a huge potential for stylistic clashes. Thankfully, that drama was avoided.

None

Marshall Hawkins by TOM HARTEN

Using bebop as the lingua franca was an inevitable, and wise decision. Opening with the Sonny Rollins classic blues, "Tenor Madness," powered by the muscular bass lines of Marshall Hawkins, tenor saxophonist Gary LeFebvre led off with a swirling solo in the Lester Young tradition--very legato. Castellanos followed with a constant stream of eighth-notes--navigating the changes with earthy swagger. Mundell Lowe posited challenging arpeggios and connected them into an intelligent whole with scale-tones and passing notes--then, tenor icon Daniel Jackson summed it all up with his burnished and yearning variations on early Coltrane.

None

McPherson, Dechter by TOM HARTEN

Somehow, Lowe and the relative youngster guitarist Graham Dechter managed to stay out of each other's way with selective chord feeding, or the occasional contrapuntal effect as on "Lady Be Good," Castellanos sliced through the harmony with fire and grace--and Lowe snuck in another relaxed and swinging statement.

None

Jackson by TOM HARTEN

Jackson's feature came on "My Romance," with a brilliant a cappella intro that referenced the theme with imaginative discourse, and when the band joined in--he teased out melodic gems that lit upon the elusive "perfect-note," more often than not.

During a frantic Charlie Parker tune ( I forget which one), LeFebvre jumped into the storm with a relaxed élan that belied the tempo--winding curlicues around the changes. Castellanos expanded and contracted the melodic contours--bending the harmony to his own purposes and tossing in mad quotes where they fit. Suddenly "surprise-guest," Charles McPherson appeared, and the energy level, which was already at a fevered pitch--cranked up dramatically. McPherson stalked the stage--on fire from the very first note. He culled and invented phrases--then twisted and turned them into something different. He chose specific notes to distort with vibrato--or expand with multiphonics--and generally tore my head off in the process.

That tune was driven by a change in the drum-chair, San Diego trap-set avatar Duncan Moore received, and answered the call of duty, and I was immediately reminded of how many questions I have to ask him about his pinpoint ride cymbal technique

There was a sublime guitar duet on "Polkadots & Moonbeams," where Dechter got a chance to shine--weaving wide contours around the changes, spitting out super-charged bebop phrases with the occasional bent-string blues angle--then Lowe distilled the melody into a purity of motion that made it all the more real.

Not everything worked perfectly. Hawkins' bass was set too far from the remarkably steady drums of Carlos Vazquez, resulting in a more opaque groove than would have evolved had they been able to hear and feel, each other, perhaps. Hawkins' solos would have been much better absorbed had everyone else dropped out when they occurred--but these details are often common with the ad-hoc nature of last night's gig.

Catellanos and McPherson expertly sketched the theme to "The Song Is You," then McPherson came out swinging, taking bebop into the 21st Century with exclamatory lines that seemed to acknowledge the sound of Ornette Coleman and the slippery phrasing of Eric Dolphy while keeping it all very Charles McPherson. Every time I hear this man--I think that he has very few peers in this world today.

None

Gary LeFebvre & Claudia Gomez- Vorce by TOM HARTEN

As a final treat, Castellanos brought the remarkable tap-dance artist Claudia Gomez-Vorce to the stage for a bravura example of how the human body is the original, primal instrument. She tore it up, with a rhythmic drive loaded with intricate subdivisions on "Caravan," that brought the house down.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Joy Division Unknown Pleasures meets Jack Black from High Fidelity-type character

Run over and scream “SHE’S LOST CONTROL!” into his face
Next Article

Joy Division Unknown Pleasures meets Jack Black from High Fidelity-type character

Run over and scream “SHE’S LOST CONTROL!” into his face

None

McPherson, Castellanos & Lowe by TOM HARTEN

A capacity house was on hand to celebrate trumpeter Gilbert Castellanos and his hand-picked San Diego Jazz Legends at Tango Del Rey last night.

Featuring as many as eight musicians sharing the stage at one time is an inherently tricky affair--especially when the ages of the musicians involved span from the mid-twenties to the early nineties. Everyone is a bandleader in their own right--so there was a huge potential for stylistic clashes. Thankfully, that drama was avoided.

None

Marshall Hawkins by TOM HARTEN

Using bebop as the lingua franca was an inevitable, and wise decision. Opening with the Sonny Rollins classic blues, "Tenor Madness," powered by the muscular bass lines of Marshall Hawkins, tenor saxophonist Gary LeFebvre led off with a swirling solo in the Lester Young tradition--very legato. Castellanos followed with a constant stream of eighth-notes--navigating the changes with earthy swagger. Mundell Lowe posited challenging arpeggios and connected them into an intelligent whole with scale-tones and passing notes--then, tenor icon Daniel Jackson summed it all up with his burnished and yearning variations on early Coltrane.

None

McPherson, Dechter by TOM HARTEN

Somehow, Lowe and the relative youngster guitarist Graham Dechter managed to stay out of each other's way with selective chord feeding, or the occasional contrapuntal effect as on "Lady Be Good," Castellanos sliced through the harmony with fire and grace--and Lowe snuck in another relaxed and swinging statement.

None

Jackson by TOM HARTEN

Jackson's feature came on "My Romance," with a brilliant a cappella intro that referenced the theme with imaginative discourse, and when the band joined in--he teased out melodic gems that lit upon the elusive "perfect-note," more often than not.

During a frantic Charlie Parker tune ( I forget which one), LeFebvre jumped into the storm with a relaxed élan that belied the tempo--winding curlicues around the changes. Castellanos expanded and contracted the melodic contours--bending the harmony to his own purposes and tossing in mad quotes where they fit. Suddenly "surprise-guest," Charles McPherson appeared, and the energy level, which was already at a fevered pitch--cranked up dramatically. McPherson stalked the stage--on fire from the very first note. He culled and invented phrases--then twisted and turned them into something different. He chose specific notes to distort with vibrato--or expand with multiphonics--and generally tore my head off in the process.

That tune was driven by a change in the drum-chair, San Diego trap-set avatar Duncan Moore received, and answered the call of duty, and I was immediately reminded of how many questions I have to ask him about his pinpoint ride cymbal technique

There was a sublime guitar duet on "Polkadots & Moonbeams," where Dechter got a chance to shine--weaving wide contours around the changes, spitting out super-charged bebop phrases with the occasional bent-string blues angle--then Lowe distilled the melody into a purity of motion that made it all the more real.

Not everything worked perfectly. Hawkins' bass was set too far from the remarkably steady drums of Carlos Vazquez, resulting in a more opaque groove than would have evolved had they been able to hear and feel, each other, perhaps. Hawkins' solos would have been much better absorbed had everyone else dropped out when they occurred--but these details are often common with the ad-hoc nature of last night's gig.

Catellanos and McPherson expertly sketched the theme to "The Song Is You," then McPherson came out swinging, taking bebop into the 21st Century with exclamatory lines that seemed to acknowledge the sound of Ornette Coleman and the slippery phrasing of Eric Dolphy while keeping it all very Charles McPherson. Every time I hear this man--I think that he has very few peers in this world today.

None

Gary LeFebvre & Claudia Gomez- Vorce by TOM HARTEN

As a final treat, Castellanos brought the remarkable tap-dance artist Claudia Gomez-Vorce to the stage for a bravura example of how the human body is the original, primal instrument. She tore it up, with a rhythmic drive loaded with intricate subdivisions on "Caravan," that brought the house down.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Comments
1

I always enjoy San Diego's great jazz musicians. Also, I always learn a little something when I read these articles and see these wonderful pictures.

May 28, 2012

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close