Anchor ads are not supported on this page.

4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Paul Keeling: The Farthest Reach

Vancouver pianist Paul Keeling grew up in San Diego, where his musical upbringing was reflective of the Del Mar jazz scene, classical music and choral studies, and, an important exposure to the music of Pat Metheny in the '80s.

He began a four year association with trumpeter Gilbert Castellanos in the '90s, leading him to an appreciation of the classic post-bop music of the '60s Blue Note era.

All of these disparate elements are woven into the personal narrative Keeling offers up on The Farthest Reach, a sublime collection of original and classic jazz material in trio and quintet expressions.

"Alpenglow," opens the disc, and sounds equally influenced by classical music and the kind of piano trios that have recorded material for the influential German label ECM over the last forty years. Keeling displays a Lyle Mayes-esque sense of motion and flow, and bassist Sean Cronin plays with a huge, woody sound, reminding me a lot of Buster Williams. Morgan Childs rattles around effectively at the edges of his drums before turning in a short, inventive, cymbal-centric solo.

"The Bitteroot," begins with the strumming bass of Cronin, while Keeling drops perfectly spaced chords to outline the theme. At about the 2 minute mark, trumpeter Chris Davis and tenor saxophonist Steve Kaldestad enter with the neatly harmonized melody, which Keeling loosely elaborates with sparkling tones.

"Bright Size Life," is taken at a slightly brisker pace than Pat Metheny's original, debut effort, but the execution reflects Keeling's long-time admiration for the work of the guitarist. The pianist effortlessly navigates between the piece's two contrasting motifs, with Cronin and Childs in perfectly choreographed lockstep. The bassist squeezes in a beautiful solo that balances his keen sense of space with streams of multi-note ideas.

Kenny Dorham's "Escapade," follows, and it sounds completely modern in Keeling's arrangement as it glides between a probing ostinato and a joyous swing time. Keeling chooses his notes carefully, reflecting both a Wynton Kelly and a Bill Evans sensibility.

The title track begins dreamy and rhapsodic, with gorgeous melodic pacing. There are some harmonies that will bring Keith Jarrett to mind. When the bass and drums enter, the piece shifts into a "straight-eights" feel, and once the horns layer in, a new scene emerges. Kaldestad adds a fluid and winding solo, yielding to Keeling's ecstatic turn over the singing whole-notes of Cronin and the churning rhythms of Childs.

"King Of Clubs," is an unabashed swinger in the tradition of Freddie Hubbard or Lee Morgan. Over the furious time of Childs and Cronin, Keeling lets strands of chord-tone melodic invention fly. Davis solos with the Harmon mute, ornamenting the harmony nicely while Kaldestad rips off an intense essay that slices through the changes. Childs gets a short turn, accents ricocheting across the stereo curtain before everyone returns to a wild finish.

The driving pulse of Mauna Loa," reminds me of some of Woody Shaw's excellent output from his halcyon days. Davis bursts out of the gates first with a tart exposition filled with joyful note squeezing and long, intricate lines, in probably his best solo of the date.

There's a delicious sense of balance on this disc between the traditional and the modern, as well as between the trio and quintet segments which favor the trio — but only slightly. Keeling and his compatriots have fashioned a document that deserves repeated listening... and rewards it.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

BattleMage makes EverQuest Corpse Run

Corpse Run is a 6.3% dry-hopped ABV West Coast IPA brewed with Nectaron, Mosaic, and Motueka hops
Next Article

San Diego mega homeless shelter at Kettner and Vine bumps along

Building's owner Douglas Hamm thinks it's "perfect"

Vancouver pianist Paul Keeling grew up in San Diego, where his musical upbringing was reflective of the Del Mar jazz scene, classical music and choral studies, and, an important exposure to the music of Pat Metheny in the '80s.

He began a four year association with trumpeter Gilbert Castellanos in the '90s, leading him to an appreciation of the classic post-bop music of the '60s Blue Note era.

All of these disparate elements are woven into the personal narrative Keeling offers up on The Farthest Reach, a sublime collection of original and classic jazz material in trio and quintet expressions.

"Alpenglow," opens the disc, and sounds equally influenced by classical music and the kind of piano trios that have recorded material for the influential German label ECM over the last forty years. Keeling displays a Lyle Mayes-esque sense of motion and flow, and bassist Sean Cronin plays with a huge, woody sound, reminding me a lot of Buster Williams. Morgan Childs rattles around effectively at the edges of his drums before turning in a short, inventive, cymbal-centric solo.

"The Bitteroot," begins with the strumming bass of Cronin, while Keeling drops perfectly spaced chords to outline the theme. At about the 2 minute mark, trumpeter Chris Davis and tenor saxophonist Steve Kaldestad enter with the neatly harmonized melody, which Keeling loosely elaborates with sparkling tones.

"Bright Size Life," is taken at a slightly brisker pace than Pat Metheny's original, debut effort, but the execution reflects Keeling's long-time admiration for the work of the guitarist. The pianist effortlessly navigates between the piece's two contrasting motifs, with Cronin and Childs in perfectly choreographed lockstep. The bassist squeezes in a beautiful solo that balances his keen sense of space with streams of multi-note ideas.

Kenny Dorham's "Escapade," follows, and it sounds completely modern in Keeling's arrangement as it glides between a probing ostinato and a joyous swing time. Keeling chooses his notes carefully, reflecting both a Wynton Kelly and a Bill Evans sensibility.

The title track begins dreamy and rhapsodic, with gorgeous melodic pacing. There are some harmonies that will bring Keith Jarrett to mind. When the bass and drums enter, the piece shifts into a "straight-eights" feel, and once the horns layer in, a new scene emerges. Kaldestad adds a fluid and winding solo, yielding to Keeling's ecstatic turn over the singing whole-notes of Cronin and the churning rhythms of Childs.

"King Of Clubs," is an unabashed swinger in the tradition of Freddie Hubbard or Lee Morgan. Over the furious time of Childs and Cronin, Keeling lets strands of chord-tone melodic invention fly. Davis solos with the Harmon mute, ornamenting the harmony nicely while Kaldestad rips off an intense essay that slices through the changes. Childs gets a short turn, accents ricocheting across the stereo curtain before everyone returns to a wild finish.

The driving pulse of Mauna Loa," reminds me of some of Woody Shaw's excellent output from his halcyon days. Davis bursts out of the gates first with a tart exposition filled with joyful note squeezing and long, intricate lines, in probably his best solo of the date.

There's a delicious sense of balance on this disc between the traditional and the modern, as well as between the trio and quintet segments which favor the trio — but only slightly. Keeling and his compatriots have fashioned a document that deserves repeated listening... and rewards it.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Roni Ben-Hur live at The Studio, June 2

Next Article

Gary Burton Quartet Live

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox Movies@Home — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close

Anchor ads are not supported on this page.

This Week’s Reader This Week’s Reader