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Trio M : The Guest House

Trio M is composed of bassist extraordinaire Mark Dresser, Bay Area pianist Myra Melford and the New York based drummer, Matt Wilson.

The Guest House is their brand new CD, recorded for the longstanding German label Enja.

This is not your average "piano-trio" by a long shot. Melford and Dresser have been exploring the world of "Telematic-Performances" for several years now, and their hook-up is approaching the telepathic. Wilson is one of the most creative and swinging drummers on the East Coast, and together, the trio manages to nail the traditional expectations while shattering the boundaries of convention.

Beginning with the Melford penned title track, there is an instant surge of joy in this music. The pianist's rollicking left hand bass-lines get you ready to dance, then suddenly the music veers left for a startling double bass solo where Dresser accompanies himself rhythmically through whispered hissing, (kind of like a muted hi-hat), while performing all manner of two-handed magic on the fingerboard.

"Kind Of Nine" is very rhythmically complex, but the multiple meters are absorbed so organically that what visits the listening ear is a bluesy ballad, supported by Melford's storybook lyricism and the bassist's grainy, poignant statement, while Wilson directs from the rear with shimmering cymbals and tasteful rimshots.

Wilson's "Hope For The Cause," is dedicated to those whose lives have been touched by cancer. It opens with Dresser's rich but pleading arco over the beautifully reverberant tinkling of the piano. After a series of cymbal washes, Melford assumes the lead with minimalist layered melodies worthy of Bill Evans.

Dresser's explosive ostinato begins "The Promised Land," over the churning drums, before a series of metric unisons follow. Melford lets a series of blue-note trills fly, then dances around the tricky form, eventually peppering the broken rhythms with Monkish intervals and manic atonal runs.

The 12 minute plus "Tele Mojo," starts with eerie ponticello bowing around the out-of-time musings of Melford, dramatically, the focus of the piano shifts radically to wild ethnic marimba sounds, courtesy of alnico magnets placed between the strings. Dresser signals straight time with plucked sequences, Wilson's pinpoint ride cymbal articulations lighting the path.

"Al," is Wilson's homage to avant garde saxophone icon Albert Ayler, and it begins with the kind of slurring fanfare he was known for, before proceeding into a remarkable timbre-rich, virtuoso solo by Dresser. A three-way freedom ensues, occasionally brought back to Earth with little bits of walking bass.

Bi-tonal, two-handed tapping begin the joyously Zimbabwean inspired dance of "Ekoneni." When piano and drums enter, there are short bits of call-and-response that ricochet between the three before Melford takes over with an ecstatic, melodious solo that made me recall Keith Jarrett in mid-flight.

The Guest House is terrific stuff, and the production-values are top notch all the way, from the crystalline sound to the superior artwork and graphics.

Check out this short, promotional video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVaz5Zah0BI

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Trio M is composed of bassist extraordinaire Mark Dresser, Bay Area pianist Myra Melford and the New York based drummer, Matt Wilson.

The Guest House is their brand new CD, recorded for the longstanding German label Enja.

This is not your average "piano-trio" by a long shot. Melford and Dresser have been exploring the world of "Telematic-Performances" for several years now, and their hook-up is approaching the telepathic. Wilson is one of the most creative and swinging drummers on the East Coast, and together, the trio manages to nail the traditional expectations while shattering the boundaries of convention.

Beginning with the Melford penned title track, there is an instant surge of joy in this music. The pianist's rollicking left hand bass-lines get you ready to dance, then suddenly the music veers left for a startling double bass solo where Dresser accompanies himself rhythmically through whispered hissing, (kind of like a muted hi-hat), while performing all manner of two-handed magic on the fingerboard.

"Kind Of Nine" is very rhythmically complex, but the multiple meters are absorbed so organically that what visits the listening ear is a bluesy ballad, supported by Melford's storybook lyricism and the bassist's grainy, poignant statement, while Wilson directs from the rear with shimmering cymbals and tasteful rimshots.

Wilson's "Hope For The Cause," is dedicated to those whose lives have been touched by cancer. It opens with Dresser's rich but pleading arco over the beautifully reverberant tinkling of the piano. After a series of cymbal washes, Melford assumes the lead with minimalist layered melodies worthy of Bill Evans.

Dresser's explosive ostinato begins "The Promised Land," over the churning drums, before a series of metric unisons follow. Melford lets a series of blue-note trills fly, then dances around the tricky form, eventually peppering the broken rhythms with Monkish intervals and manic atonal runs.

The 12 minute plus "Tele Mojo," starts with eerie ponticello bowing around the out-of-time musings of Melford, dramatically, the focus of the piano shifts radically to wild ethnic marimba sounds, courtesy of alnico magnets placed between the strings. Dresser signals straight time with plucked sequences, Wilson's pinpoint ride cymbal articulations lighting the path.

"Al," is Wilson's homage to avant garde saxophone icon Albert Ayler, and it begins with the kind of slurring fanfare he was known for, before proceeding into a remarkable timbre-rich, virtuoso solo by Dresser. A three-way freedom ensues, occasionally brought back to Earth with little bits of walking bass.

Bi-tonal, two-handed tapping begin the joyously Zimbabwean inspired dance of "Ekoneni." When piano and drums enter, there are short bits of call-and-response that ricochet between the three before Melford takes over with an ecstatic, melodious solo that made me recall Keith Jarrett in mid-flight.

The Guest House is terrific stuff, and the production-values are top notch all the way, from the crystalline sound to the superior artwork and graphics.

Check out this short, promotional video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVaz5Zah0BI

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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