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Qualcomm Named One of Fortune's 100 Best Employers

For the 13th straight year, Qualcomm is on Fortune Magazine's list of the 100 Best Companies to Work For. The list came out today (Jan. 20). Qualcomm is 33rd. Fortune notes that the company has 100% health care coverage, online fitness center, subsidized gym membership, job sharing, compressed workweek, and telecommuting, although it doesn't offer paid sabbaticals or onsite child care. The most common job is a staff engineer, paid an average $134,211. The most common hourly job is a building service attendant, paid $24,001. The company has 12,520 U.S. employees and 3,829 employees outside the U.S. Job growth is 2% annually and voluntary turnover is 3%. Minorities are 55% of employment and women 24%. The company offers domestic partner benefits for same-sex couples, and has a non-discrimination policy that includes sexual orientation. Among the services provided are community concerts, library, mobile spa and weight watchers. Says Fortune, "In an apparent bid to displace Google as the most innovative feeder of employees, the wireless technology leader imported a New York City chef to oversee its cafes, which feature fresh foods sourced from local farmers and no canned foods."

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For the 13th straight year, Qualcomm is on Fortune Magazine's list of the 100 Best Companies to Work For. The list came out today (Jan. 20). Qualcomm is 33rd. Fortune notes that the company has 100% health care coverage, online fitness center, subsidized gym membership, job sharing, compressed workweek, and telecommuting, although it doesn't offer paid sabbaticals or onsite child care. The most common job is a staff engineer, paid an average $134,211. The most common hourly job is a building service attendant, paid $24,001. The company has 12,520 U.S. employees and 3,829 employees outside the U.S. Job growth is 2% annually and voluntary turnover is 3%. Minorities are 55% of employment and women 24%. The company offers domestic partner benefits for same-sex couples, and has a non-discrimination policy that includes sexual orientation. Among the services provided are community concerts, library, mobile spa and weight watchers. Says Fortune, "In an apparent bid to displace Google as the most innovative feeder of employees, the wireless technology leader imported a New York City chef to oversee its cafes, which feature fresh foods sourced from local farmers and no canned foods."

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Comments
19

Just a few years ago, it was said that Qualcomm was using temp employees heavily. If they are still doing that, the figures you quote above apply only to the "regular" employees, the chosen few. And those temps at that time ran heavily to engineers, computer programmers, and other "professional" tech workers. It would be awfully interesting to know just what the ratio of regular employees to temp enployees is at Qualcomm.

Jan. 20, 2011

I just used the figures Fortune gave. I don't know the status including temps. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 20, 2011

Such a great company. Perhaps all their Indian H-1B are so happy to be here, they give them high praises. In fact this is a list of H-1B's applications filled in 2010, during the big unemployment crises in America. This data is from the U.S. Govt. LCA database. System Test Engineer 41.94 VLSI CAD ENGINEER 13.7 Senior Product Manager 41.94 VLSI Verification/Integration Engineer 13.7 Software Engineer 41.94 Senior Programmer Analyst 31 VLSI RF/Analog IC Design Engineer 35.91 Senior Software Engineer 41.27 VLSI Product Test Engineer 35.91 System Test Engineer 26.4 VLSI RF/Analog IC Engineer 35.91 VLSI Verification/Intergration Engineer 13.7 IT Engineer 26.4 Staff Applications Engineer 35.91 Systems Test Engineer 26.4 Database Administrator 29.32 VLSI RF/Analog IC Engineer 35.91 Associate Technical Writer 18.15 Systems Engineer 41.95 Systems Engineer 41.95 VLSI CAD Engineer 20.87 Systems Engineer 41.94 VLSI RF/Analog IC Design Engineer 35.91 Project Manager, Business Systems Analyst 31 Project Manager, Business Systems Analyst 31 Associate Technical Writer 18.15 Business Development Manager 43.35 Software Engineer 41.94 Software Engineer 38.37 VLSI CAD Engineer 13.7 VLSI CAD Engineer 30.16 Systems Engineer 41.94 Sr. Database Administrator 29.32 VLSI RF/Analog IC 35.92 Patent Strategist 56.89 VLSI RF/Analog IC Engineer 35.92 VLSI Digital Engineer 39.07 Senior Software Engineer 41.94 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 39.07 System Test Engineer 35.91 VLSI CAD Engineer 20.46 System Test Engineer 30.87 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 VLSI RF/Analog IC 35.92 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 Systems Engineer 28.45 VLSI Integration/Verification 26.4 VLSI CAD 35.51 Systems Engineer 26.4 VLSI CAD Engineer 13.7 VLSI Integration/Verification 24.99 Software Engineer 26.29 Systems Engineer 41.94 Systems Engineer 41.94 RF Engineer 39.07 Systems Engineer 26.4 VLSI RF/Analog IC 39.07 Software Engineer 26.4 Software Engineer 26.4 VLSI Verification/Integration Engineer 35.91 Systems Engineer 26.4 Staff Programmer Analyst 34.62 IT Engineer 13.7 System Test Engineer 26.4 VLSI CAD Engineer 20.46 Manager, International Regulatory Affairs 31.08 Systems Engineer 26.4 Systems Engineer 21.36 Senior Systems Engineer 41.94 Software Engineer 26.4 Software Engineer 39.93 Senior Systems Engineer 41.94 Ssytems Engineer 26.29 Sytems Engineer 26.29 Senior Programmer Analyst 31 VLSI CAD Engineer 71956 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 62738 Software Engineer 64207 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 83087 Software Engineer 64207 VLSI CAD ENGINEER 53165 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 62738

Jan. 20, 2011

I suspected we might get back to this controversy. The last post on this topic was one of our more provocative ones. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 20, 2011

Such a great company. Perhaps all their Indian H-1B are so happy to be here, they give them high praises. In fact this is a list of H-1B's applications filled in 2010, during the big unemployment crises in America. This data is from the U.S. Govt. LCA database.

System Test Engineer 41.94 VLSI CAD ENGINEER 13.7 Senior Product Manager 41.94 VLSI Verification/Integration Engineer 13.7 Software Engineer 41.94 Senior Programmer Analyst 31 VLSI RF/Analog IC Design Engineer 35.91 Senior Software Engineer 41.27 VLSI Product Test Engineer 35.91 System Test Engineer 26.4 VLSI RF/Analog IC Engineer 35.91 VLSI Verification/Intergration Engineer 13.7 IT Engineer 26.4 Staff Applications Engineer 35.91 Systems Test Engineer 26.4 Database Administrator 29.32 VLSI RF/Analog IC Engineer 35.91 Associate Technical Writer 18.15 Systems Engineer 41.95 Systems Engineer 41.95 VLSI CAD Engineer 20.87 Systems Engineer 41.94 VLSI RF/Analog IC Design Engineer 35.91 Project Manager, Business Systems Analyst 31 Project Manager, Business Systems Analyst 31 Associate Technical Writer 18.15 Business Development Manager 43.35 Software Engineer 41.94 Software Engineer 38.37 VLSI CAD Engineer 13.7 VLSI CAD Engineer 30.16 Systems Engineer 41.94 Sr. Database Administrator 29.32 VLSI RF/Analog IC 35.92 Patent Strategist 56.89 VLSI RF/Analog IC Engineer 35.92 VLSI Digital Engineer 39.07 Senior Software Engineer 41.94 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 39.07 System Test Engineer 35.91 VLSI CAD Engineer 20.46 System Test Engineer 30.87 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 VLSI RF/Analog IC 35.92 Systems Engineer, Senior 41.94 Systems Engineer 28.45 VLSI Integration/Verification 26.4 VLSI CAD 35.51 Systems Engineer 26.4 VLSI CAD Engineer 13.7 VLSI Integration/Verification 24.99 Software Engineer 26.29 Systems Engineer 41.94 Systems Engineer 41.94 RF Engineer 39.07 Systems Engineer 26.4 VLSI RF/Analog IC 39.07 Software Engineer 26.4 Software Engineer 26.4 VLSI Verification/Integration Engineer 35.91 Systems Engineer 26.4 Staff Programmer Analyst 34.62 IT Engineer 13.7 System Test Engineer 26.4 VLSI CAD Engineer 20.46 Manager, International Regulatory Affairs 31.08 Systems Engineer 26.4 Systems Engineer 21.36 Senior Systems Engineer 41.94 Software Engineer 26.4 Software Engineer 39.93 Senior Systems Engineer 41.94 Ssytems Engineer 26.29 Sytems Engineer 26.29 Senior Programmer Analyst 31 VLSI CAD Engineer 71956 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 62738 Software Engineer 64207 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 83087 Software Engineer 64207 VLSI CAD ENGINEER 53165 VLSI Digital Design Engineer 62738

Jan. 20, 2011

Ponze brings the truth-the H-1B visa program is a scam.

You will never be able to tell me we need to IMPORT employees from other nations in the middle of a DEPRESSION because we cannot fill those jobs. BULL****

It is corporate America skimping on expenses at the expense of the nation and it's citizens.

We are a banana republic, with the rule of law for sale to the highest (corporate/special interest) bidder.

Jan. 20, 2011

Robert Reich is out with an interesting commentary. In a nutshell, he says that China has a national economic strategy designed to make it and its people the powerhouse of the future. The strategy is focused on jobs for the Chinese people. But US economic policy is focused on helping multinational companies maximize profits. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 20, 2011

Robert Reich put out an op-ed pice last week saying public unions and their compensation were not a problem. Ridiculous statement.

I'm sorry, after reading that bedtime story op-ed piece I cannot take anything he says seriously.

Jan. 20, 2011

Democrats and liberals have a problem on the question of government employee pay: some feel they have to defend it lest they ruffle their political base. In San Diego, Democrats Donna Frye and Mike Aguirre stood up to the unions. Democrat Scott Peters whored out to them. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 21, 2011

One of my first jobs out of high school was working for GM on an assembly line. At the time GM had a great program that allowed college students to work part-time in a high paying (union) job while going to school full time. Seeing the abuses of unions first-hand,pushed me to become a long-time Republican that believed that Unions were inherently evil.

In the last 10-15 years though, the pendulum has swung completely in the other direction. Due to insufficient labor representation in government, American corporations have been allowed to wreck the country in order to maximize their short term profits. We've seen extensive outsourcing that eliminated manufacturing jobs, then technical and engineering jobs and most recently service sector jobs. All while importing millions of new workers under the various Visa classes (particularly the H1B). These sorts of abuses are simply not allowed in other countries, because most other countries have labor representation in government that prevent these sorts of abuses.

The damage done to the US economy mostly happened under the GOP watch, but truthfully the Dems share in this as well (anyone remember Al Gore's statements that NAFTA would result in more American jobs?).

The truth is that there needs to be a balance between profits and labor. Corporations should be allowed to maximize profits so long as the lot of the American workers, (in particular the training and education of the American worker) are improved in the process. By failing to do so through outsourcing and Visa abuse means that American corporations are becoming increasingly irrelevant to our society.

Jan. 23, 2011

Don, I would like to read this, do you have a link?

I agree 100% with this summary. After we won the Cold War, the US has lost it's way. The only national focus is to let corporations do whatever they want in order to generate profits. American style capitalism is broken however because in focusing solely on profits, it's missing the other factors that impact this country such as investment in our own labor force and keeping what's left of our technological advantage.

It's interesting to compare what is happening in Germany vs the US. German style capitalism (which was installed by the US at the end of WW2), requires companies to have worker representation in boards of companies. This representation inherently forces companies to take into account the impact of workers in addition to maximizing profits. The result is a constant focus on worker training in order to maximize efficiency and keep costs low.

Interestingly enough, Germany has become an export powerhouse that was the #1 world-wide exporter up until it was narrowly passed by China recently. Unlike China though it achieves these exports with high quality goods that are technologically sophisticated. These products are made by workers with a high living standard, that enjoy high wages. China on the other hand, achieves its export dominance with brutal working conditions and near slave labor.

In the US the drive for greater profits has resulted in extensive outsourcing and technology giveaways that will harm our country for generations to come.

Jan. 23, 2011

Part I

Is Qualcomm one of the best companies to work for in the US, or should the poll have been titled, "USA one of the best countries in the world to live and raise a family?

Let's examine these facts a little more closely:

In almost every year over the past 10 years, government figures show that Qualcomm is in the top 10 list of companies that tap the H1B Visa System. Excluding the companies at the top of that list that are Indian companies specializing in outsourcing (Tata, Wipro, Infosys, etc.), Qualcomm ranks closer to the top 5 of US-based companies that tap this system.

If these H1B numbers are correct: http://www.myvisajobs.com/Visa-Sponsor/Qualcomm/441292.htm

Then from 2000-2010 there have been an astounding 6,200 people that were either imported by Qualcomm, or came to work for Qualcomm due to a direct Visa petition from the company. That translates to an incredible 50% of the overall US workforce. The vast majority of these are engineers (especially software), so this translates to a guestimate of ~80%+ of their entire US engineering workforce.

It also explains the 55% minority figure, a minority that is counted as such despite the fact that these people were never disadvantaged or a minority in their own country of origin. Listing them as a minority may sound great in PR publications and it may also help the company qualify for Government programs. But it does a huge disservice to true US born minority communities in the US. In particular, Latino and Black segments of the US population continue to be under-represented in technology jobs (including at Qualcomm), and bringing in cheap foreign labor, rather than encourage this group of disadvantaged Americans is disappointing at best. Using these foreign guest workers in minority figures is more than disappointing, it's reprehensible.

What's also interesting is that Qualcomm has a reputation for turning away qualified resumes by the boatload while still tapping the H1B pipeline. To my knowledge Qualcomm doesn't release resume figures, but from what I've heard less than 1% of resumes received result in a callback. This, despite the fact that many applicants who are turned away, are highly qualified, and the US unemployment rate is high.

It is however, a lot easier to get hired if you know someone who works there. Now that the vast majority of the engineering workforce is Indian, this has created a general tendency to prefer this group over others during hiring and has even created occasional situations of reverse discrimination. A bold claim to be sure, but substantiated by the people that I know who work there.

Jan. 22, 2011

All of this is worth further investigation. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 23, 2011

Part II Qualcomm is also known in the industry for working people very hard. The company brings in dinner at 8pm every night so that people can eat quickly and get back to work, with typical work days running until 10 or 11pm at night (brings new meaning to the phrase "will work for food"). Average work weeks are about 65 hrs, but will go double that figure during frequent schedule crunches. These are all unpaid hours and so that juicy salary of $134K/year works out to about $39 per hour when the full hours worked are considered. Not bad, but not a fortune. My car mechanic charges me $90/hr. He has to pay rent on his shop, but he also gets paid when he decides to work late and on weekends. All in all he enjoys a better standard of living than an engineer at Qualcomm because 1) he works roughly 50 hrs per week, 2) works overtime on his own schedule and 3) takes home a significantly higher paycheck. Incidentally, my mechanic is also the son of a Harvard MBA graduate and he firmly believes that he is in the right field of work, because in his words, "Globalization is the bulldozer that is erasing the American Middle Class".

Last year when Qualcomm was ranked on this same list of best companies to work for, a Qualcomm engineer told me this, "I don't know who those people are. I don't know who would want to work for this company". This same person went on to tell me that he was forced to work 7 days a week for 6 months straight, without a single day off. My heart went out to him as he told me this story, he looked like "walking death", deep sunken eyes, and with a very sullen and broken expression. Later I found out that a Qualcomm employee had committed suicide by jumping off the roof of the same building that this person worked.

With these numbers in mind, isn't it obvious who would want to work at Qualcomm? It's the 6200 people that were brought here as immigrants, people who will put up with the long hours in exchange for getting out of the much worse environment that they came from. These people are here to obtain U.S. residency for themselves and their family. In their mind, Qualcomm is giving them a huge opportunity to better their lives. But let's put credit where credit is due. Qualcomm has no altruistic motivations in importing this labor, they are simply exploiting these people because of their desire to work in the U.S. To Qualcomm, these people represent an eager workforce who are working long hours, who are less prone to jump ship to another company (because of H1B restrictions), who put downward pressure on salaries, and who by their sheer numbers, are able to shift the balance of power in the job market firmly towards the employer.

Jan. 22, 2011

It seems you don't know if the person who committed suicide was the same one that you talked with. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 23, 2011

Part III

Let's not fool ourseleves though, the real unspoken driver in this poll is the fact that the US, despite the recent economic downturn continues to be the best country in the world to live in. It got this way because of an egalitarian culture that allows anyone, from any walk of life to rise to any position. What gave rise to this egalitarian culture was the size and vibrancy of our Middle Class. A Middle Class that is on an unfortunate downward spiral, exactly because of the outsourcing and H1B Visa policies of companies like Qualcomm. There are many less opportunities available for Americans graduating college now, particularly in technology than were available in prior years and decades.

In summary, for those 6200 immigrants who makeup 50% of Qualcomm's US workforce and ~80% of the engineering workforce, Qualcomm seems like a great company to work. A shiny beacon of light that flashes, "US Residency". It's also great for those who work in support roles such as HR, Marketing and Finance because they get to share in the perks (Qualcomm's great benefits package) without having to put in the massive amounts of hours. It's also great if you're a highly compensated Director, VP or a CEO (isn't this true by definition at any company?). However, it's not so great if you are an American born engineer at Qualcomm who has seen their hours steadily increase over the past 10 years. In fact, many of those have most likely left the company. It's also not great if you're an American born engineer who is now entering the workforce, one who is facing a dismal job market due to the twin forces of outsourcing and H1B Visa abuse. It's also not so great for engineers who want to work in an ethnically diverse environment, one that is not monolithically Indian. It's also not great for San Diegan engineers who don't work at Qualcomm, who have seen the local job market heavily impacted by this massive importation of cheap labor.

Jan. 22, 2011

It seems that there are a number of unhappy Qualcomm employees, particularly engineers losing their positions to imported personnel. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 23, 2011

I was offered a job with Qualcomm back in 1997. Back then they had a reputation of hiring talented young engineers, working them like dogs and burning them out within 6 years or so. I turned them down. In retrospect it would have been smart to take the job, because the stock options would have been worth millions in 2000.

Back then people were willing to work hard for reasonable pay because of the chance your stock option would take off. I have never understood how a company like Qualcomm can continue on successfully after making the majority of their engineering staff rich. Why would you stay and work as many hours when you have 15 to 20 years salary in the bank? Why would new employees come and work as hard when there is zero chance that the stock can rise that dramatically a second time?

Qualcomm Management's approach apparently hasn't changed, because I was told by a senior engineer who just hired on with them (after consulting for several years) that their motto is still: "If you don't come in to work on Saturday, then don't bother to come back on Sunday!"

Apparently to solve that problem Qualcomm has turned to foreign workers.

Jan. 24, 2011

You allude to a problem that other techs have. It's especially acute in Silicon Valley. Those who got in early get incredibly rich. The stock soars and stays high. Those who get in later have a hard time making a profit on their options. The others who are rich retire early or lie down on the job. Best, Don Bauder

Jan. 25, 2011

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