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Ponzi Schemer J. David "Jerry" Dominelli Is Dead

J. David "Jerry" Dominelli, whose multi-million dollar Ponzi scheme rocked San Diego in the 1980s, continuing into the 1990s, has died. His obituary ran in August in the Chicago Tribune, but it mentioned no details of his life. He was 68. The obituary lists his parents as Victor and the late Florence Dominelli. Reporters during the 1980s tried to contact Victor and Florence Dominelli of Chicago for details on their son. The obituary also lists one of his siblings, Victor Dominelli, and his wife, Maria. They live in San Diego. (Victor told me earlier never to contact him again and hung up.) The obituary lists two daughters, Samantha and Jennifer. A Samantha Dominelli lives in San Diego, but I could not reach her. A Jennifer Dominelli was once in Escondido, but I could not reach her. I talked with several people who had been involved in the J. David affair, and they believed the details of the obituary matched their recollections. Dominelli went to prison in 1985 and spent more than ten years there. He was released to Chicago. He had suffered a stroke while incarcerated.

Dominelli's lover at the time was Nancy Hoover, who is now named Nancy Fletcher, having married Eugene Fletcher of the famous banking/investment family. She and her husband spend much of their time in Puerto Vallarta. I could not reach her for comment. She was sentenced to 10 years in prison for her role in the scam, but was released after 30 months. The government has never revealed why she was let out early. I could not reach Gay Hugo-Martinez, who prosecuted her.

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J. David "Jerry" Dominelli, whose multi-million dollar Ponzi scheme rocked San Diego in the 1980s, continuing into the 1990s, has died. His obituary ran in August in the Chicago Tribune, but it mentioned no details of his life. He was 68. The obituary lists his parents as Victor and the late Florence Dominelli. Reporters during the 1980s tried to contact Victor and Florence Dominelli of Chicago for details on their son. The obituary also lists one of his siblings, Victor Dominelli, and his wife, Maria. They live in San Diego. (Victor told me earlier never to contact him again and hung up.) The obituary lists two daughters, Samantha and Jennifer. A Samantha Dominelli lives in San Diego, but I could not reach her. A Jennifer Dominelli was once in Escondido, but I could not reach her. I talked with several people who had been involved in the J. David affair, and they believed the details of the obituary matched their recollections. Dominelli went to prison in 1985 and spent more than ten years there. He was released to Chicago. He had suffered a stroke while incarcerated.

Dominelli's lover at the time was Nancy Hoover, who is now named Nancy Fletcher, having married Eugene Fletcher of the famous banking/investment family. She and her husband spend much of their time in Puerto Vallarta. I could not reach her for comment. She was sentenced to 10 years in prison for her role in the scam, but was released after 30 months. The government has never revealed why she was let out early. I could not reach Gay Hugo-Martinez, who prosecuted her.

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Comments
76

Last I remember, good old Nancy was married to some Santa Barbara mega-millionaire named Ken Hunter. Guess he must have either died or tired of her. So, now she's a Fletcher, huh? She's the one that stories and books should feature, not Jerry. He was her enabler. And she outlived him. Is there anything fair in life? He was sent up for twenty years, served ten. She went up for ten, served two and a half. She marries millionaires and lives the good life.

Oct. 12, 2009

Response to post #1: Ken Hunter died and Nancy came back to San Diego, landing on her feet once again by marrying into the Fletcher family. This was related in my Reader column of September 8, 2005, titled "She's No Dumbbell." The whole saga is a fascinating tale of a lovesick, sociopathic guy and a very ambitious girlfriend. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 12, 2009

Wow, the end has come for J. David-one of the biggest-if not thee biggest-swindlers in San Diego history.

J David has been brought up here and on other blogs every couple of years, so even 25 years later he still gets attention and he captures our imgaination of what the hell was he thinking.

Oct. 12, 2009

Response to post #3: But his Ponzi scheme was small by comparison with what is going on today. He pleaded guilty to engineering an $80 million scheme. Compare that to Madoff's $50 billion one. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 12, 2009

Everything is small compared to today.

How many billionaires did America have in 1982, 83, 84 85, maybe 5, 10?? Today there are probably 300-400.

Oct. 12, 2009

Response to post #5: My recollection is that you have to be a billionaire to make it into the Forbes 400. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 12, 2009

Don: Couldn't resist jumping in here. As one of the Union reporters assigned to the J.David story of the mid-80s, I've frequently wondered what ever became of the Great Humbug. Thanks for the reportage. I'm still amazed how after 25 years, Dominelli pulled it off. To those of us who scratched the story below the surface, he was always nothing but a transparent fraud.I still say shame on San Diego's rich and famous for falling for the old dodge that a common investor can reap 40 percent plus on his money -- especially arbitrage. They should known better. Remember how the LA Times insisted that J David had squirreled all the money safe and sound in Switerzerland for all his investors. Shame on them. We knew the cupboard was bare, the money all spent. I also wonder if Roger H. shed a tear upon hearing the news of the passing of his great Sugar Daddy. After all, at one time Dominelli held the deed to his house. You pegged Nancy Hoover to a tea --nothing but a gold digger. Best regards, Terry.

Oct. 12, 2009

Response to post #7: Haven't heard from you in ages, Terry. Send me an email at [email protected] and let me know where you are and what you are doing. Back in 1982, two years before the scandal broke, Fred Muir of the Union (that was before there was a U-T) spent days on a Dominelli series of stories, trying to figure out whether his suspicions were true. He couldn't pin it down, although his series did raise doubts. Upon leaving SD for a job with the Wall Street Journal, Fred rode his motorcycle past the J. David hq in LJ and flipped the bird, shouting, "I'll get you, you s.o.b.!" Fred was an excellent reporter, but Dominelli kept it covered then, just as Madoff kept his $50 billion Ponzi covered for much longer than Dominelli kept his hidden. What keeps these scams going is greedy victims. They want to believe that the rosy statements they receive each month represent real money. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 12, 2009

Don,

I saw your reference to the book you wrote and bought it a couple of weeks ago. Finished reading it last Friday and was thinking of contacting you to ask this very question. Now that this question is answered, I have a new one. Great book by the way. Very well researched. You mentioned in the book about the slow growth mentality of some of the people in the book. Is there going to be a follow up book regarding how San Diego has changed since then. I think that you would do very well with a book like that. I live in RI now, miss San Diego but read your columns every week. Keep up the good work.

Oct. 13, 2009

Don, The bottom feeders on the list don't quite make it to the billionaires club. The last 9 on the 2009 list are "only" worth 950-990 billion, while ast year it took 1.1 billion to make the list. Prior to 2009, 2005 was the last time you could still make the list as a millionaire. According to Forbes, there are 700 billionares in the world, so the US still has more than half of them. For the surfpup: 13,15,12,13. http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2005/MichelleLee.shtml

Oct. 13, 2009

Response to post #9: Yes, San Diego has changed. The no- and slow-growthers have been shoved to the back of the bus. The real estate development industry completely runs the city and county. Environmentalism is dead in San Diego. That brings me to another thing that has changed starkly: if you will notice, the chapter devoted to Roger Hedgecock calls him a liberal Republican and environmentalist. That changed in a hurry. As soon as hate radio began catching on, and he resigned as mayor under pressure, he became an extreme right-winger, which he remains. That chapter would have to be revised, too. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 13, 2009

Response to post #10: I stand corrected. Mea maxima culpa. That makes 390 billionaires in the U.S., after three years of 400 or more. Yes, the U.S. has a good deal more than half of the billionaires, according to Forbes. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 13, 2009

For the surfpup: 13,15,12,13. http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2005/Mich...

By gardenparty

Yes, thaty sounds about right. I found this comment very infomrative on that website;

"Over time, the number of billionaires in the world has been steadily increasing. In the United States, this number had increased from a couple to a couple hundred in just twenty years or so."

Oct. 13, 2009

Response to post #13: Having this many billionaires while such a high percentage of people are living below poverty levels is leading to social instability. The stark difference between the upper 1 to 5% in wealth and income and the rest of the population is nothing short of ghastly. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 13, 2009

Nancy Hoover can still be found roaming her old haunt of Del Mar and inside financial investment offices. She’s been seen visiting her son, George Hoover Jr., at Torrey Growth & Income Advisors (the father and son investment outfit).

Ironically it’s now located just feet from where Nancy Hoover used to own a small bistro restaurant during her J. David days. As you can see here: http://tinyurl.com/1233-Camino-Del-Mar

Jerry's progeny, Jennifer (35) moved to Nashville to pursue a music and singing career after gradating from USD. She is a country song writer and artist and goes by “Jeni.”

Samantha (39) was the respondent in a divorce case filed in San Diego on February 20, 2009 by Valeri Kostadinov.

Oct. 13, 2009

You know, it is very sad when these situations involve children, who will then carry a large burden the rest of their lives.

I always think of the Broderick children when I think of the kind of damage that these situations bring on families.

Oct. 13, 2009

Response to post #15: Yes, Nancy and her current husband spend much time in Mexico, but also a lot of time in the Del Mar area. I tried to reach both George Jr. and George Sr. (her first husband) for this blog but could not reach them at Torrey Growth. While Nancy was running J. David with Dominelli, she was part owner of a Del Mar restaurant called Vittorio's, supposedly named after Dominelli's father, Victor. I don't believe the restaurant lasted long. I couldn't reach Jennifer or Samantha either. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 13, 2009

Response to post #16: Yes, these situations are traumatic for children, particularly when the story gets so much attention in the media, as the Dominelli/Hoover and Broderick sagas did. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 13, 2009

Bauder opined:

"Having this many billionaires while such a high percentage of people are living below poverty levels is leading to social instability. The stark difference between the upper 1 to 5% in wealth and income and the rest of the population is nothing short of ghastly."

Agreed. Seen this yet?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhydyxRjujU

Oct. 13, 2009

Don, I found a felony criminal case in the SD Court Case Index. It’s case CR51232 filed on 8/11/1980 against J. David Dominelli.

1980 was a couple of years before his ponzi scheme was uncovered. Does anyone know what the charges were and what the resolution of the charges or case where? That seems odd that he would be charged with a felony during his financial escapades and nobody knew about it or had any concern?

Oct. 13, 2009

Another item. I recall from your book, Captain Money and the Golden Girl, that it was George Hoover Jr. that coined the name “Captain Money.” (Please correct me if I am wrong.)

Anyway, J. David must have also cursed those close to him. Not only did his ex-wife have to file for bankruptcy in the 1990’s, but George Hoover Jr. and his wife Janet Hoover (a real estate agent for Prudential) filed Chapter 7 personal bankruptcy in in November of 1997 (Case #97-11469-PB7, Judge Peter W. Bowie)

Now I don’t know how they managed to stay or get back into the Del Mar home ownership lifestyle in less than a decade, but they did manage to do so. (Was there cash buried in coffee cans by Nancy? Hmmm)

It also shows that the same dumb people with money are still here in San Diego. Why on earth would one invest their hard earned money with an individual who can’t manage his own?

The last person I would be investing my money with is an “advisor” that recently emerged from bankruptcy!

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #19: I haven't seen the Michael Moore movie yet but certainly intend to do so. What's going on today is creating a powder keg. The stock market is going up for a couple of major reasons: 1. An ocean of liquidity, and 2. Massive layoffs that are jacking up corporate profits. The conclusion is inescapable: Wall Street is feasting on Main Street's pain. The market goes up as unemployment goes up. And I will tell you this: the last thing Wall Street wants is a strong economic recovery. It is feasting off zero short term interest rates and aberrationally low long term rates -- borrowing for zero and gambling elsewhere (and being bailed out by the government if the gambles lose.) The investment community would rather have a tepid recovery so the Federal Reserve will continue keeping interest rates low -- like the "Goldilocks economy" of the 1990s that featured "good bad news." When the economy weakened, stocks rose, buoyed by the easy money. The Wall Street chant was "not too hot, not too cold." Wall Street wants it again. We could be headed for real social unrest, because Washington gives Wall Street what it wants. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #20: I faintly remember that there was an earlier conviction. We looked into it at the time the story broke and probably reported on it. As I recall, it was minor. But it's worth checking out. There may be something about it in Captain Money and the Golden Girl. I will have to look at it again. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #21: On page 2 of Captain Money and the Golden Girl are these words: "Dominelli, the officer-in-charge, even had an officer's title: 'Captain Money.' Hoover's children named him that because he lavished so much money on them." In re the name "Golden Girl," here is the quote from the book, page 5. "Politically, Hoover was a liberal social reformer in a conservative city. As such, she had been crowned 'The Golden Girl' by fellow liberals in the media." Here's a story I have never revealed publicly before: when I signed to write the book with the company then named Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, the late Bill Jovanovich, CEO (whom I admired very much), suggested I name the book "The J. David Affair." But I turned it in with the title "Captain Money and the Golden Girl." Bill didn't flinch: that became the title, with "The J. David Affair" as the subhead in the hardback. Incidentally, I left messages with both George Hoover Jr. and George Hoover Sr. when I was trying to pin down the news on Dominelli's death, but neither returned my call. (I called in the afternoon after their office was closed, but they did not call back the next day.) Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Bill Jovanovich, CEO (whom I admired very much), suggested I name the book "The J. David Affair." But I turned it in with the title "Captain Money and the Golden Girl." Bill didn't flinch: that became the title, with "The J. David Affair" as the subhead in the hardback.

Good thing you prevailed- Captain Money and the Golden Girl is far more enticing than the J David Affair.

Oct. 14, 2009

I knew the young auditor (CPA) from the office of a national firm who was sent to Montserrat to locate J David assets. He found nothing whatsoever. Dominelli may have claimed to do his banking there, but indications were that if he did, it was just part of the ruse. So his connection to that island was largely as fictitious as the rest of his operation.

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #25: I have always thought that the title was one of the best things about the book. Those who criticized the book said the title was THE BEST part of the book. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #26: In Captain Money, the title of the chapter on Montserrat is "Fantasizing on Fantasy Island." It was typical of offshore banking -- it's greatly a myth, a black hole, to hide money from tax collectors. The largest corporations have tiny offices in tax havens such as the Cayman Islands. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Well, ain't that something. The Union-Tribune, suffering a bit of delayed reaction, today noted on the home page of its website (www.signonsandiego.com) the passing of J. David Dominelli, scoundrel extraordinaire. Seems like you broke that several days ago, didn't you, Don?

Oct. 14, 2009

The U-T needs to read the Reader online every day.

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #29: Yes, I posted Dominelli's death Monday afternoon, the Voice of San Diego had it Tuesday morning (crediting the Reader with probably posting it first) and then the U-T put it on page 1 Wednesday morning (today). The U-T's story suggests either sloppy reporting or dubious editing. The U-T's story says friends of Nancy Hoover, Dominelli's lover and business partner, hadn't seen or heard from her for years. That is extremely doubtful. As I reported on the Monday blog entry, she has married Eugene Fletcher of the famed Fletcher family, and spends part of her time in Mexico. She is frequently back in San Diego. I wrote a long article on Hoover's marriage to Eugene Fletcher for the Reader on September 8 of 2005, titled "She's No Dumbbell." It is readily accessible online and through google. Many reporters, having found the column online, have contacted me on that 2005 column on Hoover. Any good reporter can find it. The author of the U-T piece is a good reporter, as far as I know. This one may be blamed on editing, but I don't know.

There is other Union-Tribune news. It says it is coming out with an "eEdition" online that has extra features such as archives of past issues, photo and advertisement index. The U-T offers a 7-day free trial subscription. This suggests that it will cost money to purchase eEdition. I don't know if the U-T will continue its free online presence. Executives in the newspaper industry have been saying with increasing intensity that papers must charge for their online content. It has been successful for the Wall Street Journal. But the New York Times stumbled trying to sell some of its online content. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Yeah, well, the NY Times was trying to charge two dollars for an article. You can buy the whole damn paper for that kind of money. And it seems to me the U-T's "eEdition" should be called their "E-dition." It will.

Oct. 14, 2009

Well, ain't that something. The Union-Tribune, suffering a bit of delayed reaction, today noted on the home page of its website (www.signonsandiego.com) the passing of J. David Dominelli, scoundrel extraordinaire. Seems like you broke that several days ago, didn't you, Don?

By russl

UT "breaks" story = October 14, 2009

DB's story = "By Don Bauder | Posted October 12, 2009, 5:48 p.m."

Obviously the UT ran with this AFTER DB broke it 2 days ago.

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #32: I looked at the so-called extras that one will get with the eEdition and was not particularly impressed. If the U-T kills the free online edition entirely and has only eEdition, the eEdition will appeal to some people, but others will drop out quickly and decisively. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #33: Yes, the U-T was two days late on that story and still couldn't seem to locate Nancy Hoover, when the information about her marriage to Eugene Fletcher has been online for four years, and not just in the Reader archives. You can get it through google. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

NOTE: PLATINUM EQUITY WON'T GET BOSTON GLOBE, BUSINESS WEEK. After Platinum Equity bought the U-T, it got into the bidding for the Boston Globe, owned by the New York Times. Platinum was supposedly one of two in the running. But this afternoon (Oct. 14), the New York Times said it would not be selling the Globe, possibly because the bids were not high enough. Platinum had also expressed interest in buying Business Week Magazine. Yesterday, Bloomberg said it would be buying Business Week. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Speaking of the UT and papers going downhill because of the Internet-everyone should get a laugh out of this parody;

BusinessReport: Majority Of Newspapers Now Purchased By Kidnappers To Prove Date

NEW YORK—According to a report published this week in American Journalism Review, 93 percent of all newspaper sales can now be attributed to kidnappers seeking to prove the day's date in filmed ransom demands.

http://www.theonion.com/content/news/report_majority_of_newspapers_now

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #37: Hilarious. Leave it to the Onion. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

I looked at the so-called extras that one will get with the eEdition and was not particularly impressed. Best, Don Bauder

Maybe 5 years ago, for a very brief period of time, the U-T allowed the public to access the complete archives of the U-T through the internet, going back some 20 years. I would certainly be willing to pay for the eEdition if access to the complete archives came with the subscription price. If I want to locate old articles in the Union, I have to go to the SDSU Library and search index cards the Librarians maintained by hand and microfilmed.

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #39: It depends how easy the access to the archives is, how many years are made available, and at what price. Those details will be forthcoming, I suppose. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 14, 2009

Maybe 5 years ago, for a very brief period of time, the U-T allowed the public to access the complete archives of the U-T through the internet, going back some 20 years.

The UT allowed free archive retreval from the time they went online through about the time you listed-maybe sooner 2003 or so when they started charging.

I could never figure out why they didn't start charging sooner, because most newspapers online had been charging for archive records for some time before the UT did. In fact it used to cost just $1.50 per article for many papers about 8 years ago-now it is much more.

Oct. 14, 2009

Subscribers get the archives free. I subscribe, I read most of the UT stories online, but also like getting the paper edition.

The problem I have found with the UT archives is it's "buggy" and doesn't always work. I recall it worked better several years ago. Now it misses articles that I know are there, but it doesn't retrieve.

The archives are not a cost center for the UT so they don't maintain that area very well. It could be a valuable resource if it worked.

Oct. 14, 2009

Response to post #41: As the result a lawsuit brought by stringers, the U-T decided a number of years ago to sell only articles from the year 2000 forward. (I believe that was it; it's a little hazy in my mind.) That policy may have been loosened to go back further in time. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 15, 2009

Response to post #42: I simply don't know whether other newspapers consider their archives a profit center. I would assume that the new U-T owners, who are trying to wring every ounce of profit out of the paper, would try to find out if it could make the archives more remunerative. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 15, 2009

Response to post #29 To be fair I broke the story about Dominelli's death, my name is Charles Blackwood and I work for AM 600 KOGO. The station who reported it first. I think Don can verify this info.

Oct. 15, 2009

Response to post #45: I posted the story at 5:48 p.m. Monday. When did you get it on KOGO? If you had it first, you deserve full credit for being first. The Reader was the first in print. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 15, 2009

To be fair I broke the story about Dominelli's death, my name is Charles Blackwood and I work for AM 600 KOGO.

How (and when) did you find out about the death?

Don, how did you become informed?

Oct. 15, 2009

Response to post #29 To be fair I broke the story about Dominelli's death, my name is Charles Blackwood and I work for AM 600 KOGO. The station who reported it first. I think Don can verify this info.

==========

Does Blackwood have any proof to back up his claim? I doubt anyone who works at KOGO, with the exception of Roger Hedgecrock, would recognize Dominelli's name.

Oct. 15, 2009

In August, I received these two links via Google alerts. I have a lot of Google alerts setup and so receive about 50 a day and didn’t pay particular notice this these. Didn’t even realize that it wasn’t mentioned in the local press until Don broke the story in the Reader. I guess his name still strikes a chord with the locals here.

http://www.greaternashvillechurch.org/index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=&task=doc_download&gid=73

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/chicagotribune/obituary.aspx?n=jerry-d-dominelli&pid=130924755

Oct. 15, 2009

Well, I can send you copies of the emails I sent out to all the news people at KOGO at 700am Monday morning, and we could get Don to admit, that Mary from KOGO called him with the info that I gathered when I saw the obituary and I called the funeral home owner Jon to verify the name was correct. And then Mary called Don with the info I gathered.

Oct. 16, 2009

But after talking to the news crew here, at KOGO, it seems they weren't given the okay from the higher ups' to air the story until Tuesday morning. So we can give the reader the award for the first to report. But I found the story just by randomly searching info about how Roger Hedgcock came to his position.

Oct. 16, 2009

Well, I can send you copies of the emails I sent out to all the news people at KOGO at 700am Monday morning, and we could get Don to admit, that Mary from KOGO called him with the info that I gathered when I saw the obituary and I called the funeral home owner Jon to verify the name was correct. And then Mary called Don with the info I gathered.

========

1st.

Oct. 16, 2009

Well, I can send you copies of the emails I sent out to all the news people at KOGO at 700am Monday morning, and we could get Don to admit, that Mary from KOGO called him with the info that I gathered when I saw the obituary and I called the funeral home owner Jon to verify the name was correct. And then Mary called Don with the info I gathered.

========

Blackwood:

E-Mails by themselves are not admissable in a court of law unless they are authenticated by a computer expert. It might help your claim if you obtain affidavits from the KOGO news people confirming the date you broke the story. Maybe "Jon" could sign an affidavit. If your claim is true, then you clearly deserve a Pulitzer for your efforts.

Oct. 16, 2009

What's all the fuss? Clearly it was The Chicago Tribune that first reported his death.

Why the provincial mindset? It was on the world wide web months ago.

Oct. 16, 2009

53 anyways, KOGO had the story first. And the 6 articles written in print and websites is all a result of my find. When you break a news story, let someone else take credit and see how you feel.

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #47: I got the information maybe 30 minutes to 45 minutes before I posted it at 5:48 p.m. Monday. That is because from the sketchy information in the obit, I was only 99% sure I had the right person. I knew the brother Victor and his wife Maria were correct. When I learned that the names of the parents matched with those reported in the 1980s when the story was being covered, I knew it was the right person. I don't know, of course, when KOGO aired the information, if it did. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #48: If he can show when KOGO aired it, I bow to the station for breaking it first. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #49: The Tribune obit is the one that was emailed to me. The person who sent it to me called me first. I am not at liberty to say who that person was. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #50: OK, I guess I can say where I got it. Yes, Mary Ayala at KOGO called me. I said I wanted to use it. She sent me the obit. Then I made a bunch of calls to make absolutely sure I had the right person. Then after posting it, I sent a copy to Mary and left a message on her phone telling her I had verified it. I have no doubt you sent emails to people at KOGO. But the question is whether KOGO aired it. Again, if KOGO got it on air before I posted it, congratulations. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #51: Then I guess that ices the case: KOGO discovered the information, the Reader got it to the public first. Thanks to you and to Mary Ayala for tipping me off. My guess is that KOGO didn't air it because, like me, it wasn't completely sure that it was the right Jerry Dominelli without further checking. Dominelli is not an uncommon name. There are several in Chicago. I was the best one to do that checking, because I know so many people who were involved. Sometimes it pays to be an old man. I could find people with knowledge of things that happened 25 years ago. Incidentally, it was Mike Aguirre who finally cinched the case. He was able to find the name of the parents that reporters had tried to reach in the 1980s, and who were listed in the obit. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #52: Again, thanks to Mary for calling me and to you for finding the obit. Back in 2005, when I did the column revealing that Nancy Hoover had married a Fletcher and was then living in Rancho Santa Fe and spending time in Del Mar, I called every Dominelli in Chicago that I could find. I got nothing from them. And as I mentioned, his brother Victor, who is in San Diego, hung up and told me never to call him again. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #53: I'm not sure that sending an internal email constitutes breaking the story. Maybe that should go to the Supreme Court for final determination. In any case, I don't expect a Pulitzer for a two-paragraph item that in the second paragraph regurgitated information I had had in a column four years earlier. And remember, that two-paragraph item related a death that had occurred almost three months earlier. Too late with too little, but still first. Always a bridesmaid, never a bride. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #54: Agreed, Ponzi, this is much ado. I guess we are saying that the Chicago Tribune deserves a Pulitzer for running a paid ad of only a few words. But you didn't send it to me when you got it on google alerts. Why don't you send me stuff as you get it? My email is [email protected] Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Don,

I thank you, and KOGO thanks you.

Oct. 16, 2009

E-Mails by themselves are not admissable in a court of law unless they are authenticated by a computer expert.

LOL.....Burwell brings the funny again........BTW who told you that lie B?

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #64: I should be thanking you and Mary Ayala. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #65: I don't know whether Burwell or SurfPuppy is right on this one. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

re 65 Rules 901 and 902 of the Federal Rules of Evidence govern the authentication and identification of evidence, and, of them, Rule 901(b)(4) “is one of the most frequently used to authenticate e-mail and other electronic records.”

901(b)(4): Distinctive characteristics and the like. Appearance, contents, substance, internal patterns, or other distinctive characteristics, taken in conjunction with circumstances.

http://www.law.cornell.edu/rules/fre/rules.htm#Rule901

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to post #68: This is interesting. Let's hear from SP and Burwell again. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 16, 2009

I'll go woth Rule 901(b)(1);

901(b)(1) Testimony of witness with knowledge. Testimony that a matter is what it is claimed to be.

Oct. 16, 2009

Under CA state rules of evidence the document does not even have to be the original anymore ("best evidence rule"), but can be a copy..........I find that rule change a little disturbing.

Oct. 16, 2009

Burwell was being sarcastic in his comment-which I laughed at, pretty funny, he has been bringing these funny comments the last week or so, and he never used to.....but I liek it.

Oct. 16, 2009

If I received threatening E-Mail from another blogger and filed a complaint with the police, the E-Mail by itself could not be used as evidence against the blogger in a trial. The police would have to contact an Internet Service Provider (ISP)and actually prove that the Blogger sent the threatening E-Mail from his account. The same situation would apply to a civil case.

Oct. 16, 2009

Response to posts #70-73: When one side is white and the other black, there arises a gray area of the law. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 17, 2009

If I received threatening E-Mail from another blogger and filed a complaint with the police, the E-Mail by itself could not be used as evidence against the blogger in a trial.

Very true.

Have you been getting, or sending, any terroist email messages B??

I have sent my fair share of FU emails and letters, especially to dirty judges, but I make sure there are no threats in them.

But I am free to speak my mind as much as I want to, absent any threats, and I use that 1st Amendment right to the fullest extent of the law. It's what makes this country great.

Of course the best email I ever sent out was a MASS email (after I graduated!!) to the student body in grad school blasting a slimeball Dean, it was hilarious.

I spent days writing out my little sarcastic lines, adding humor into the toasting of this dirtbag. And the best part, the Dean melted down...the moron Dean then thought he could sue me!!!! For speaking my mind!

He didn't succeed. The TRUTH is an absolute defense to libel (not to mention "opinion" is not actionable and since the Dean was a public figure he had the NY Times v Sullivan standard to meet-Immmpppossible!).

One of my best paybacks ever. You know what they say about karma, this guy got a lesson in it first hand.

Oct. 18, 2009

Response to post #75: Do you sign your real name when you send derisive emails to judges? Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 18, 2009

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