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Someone emailed me a list of film critic Richard Roeper's top 25 movies of the year. Now that Roeper and Ebert are no longer doing the reviews on TV, I'm not familiar with what he's been up to. The column he wrote for one of the Chicago papers was always well written and funny. And, I thought he had better taste in movies than Ebert.

Anyway, here is his list of the top 25 of the year. And my comments after each of his picks.

  1. "Slumdog Millionaire". This movie is highly overrated by the critics, but it's good. And, way better use of musician M.I.A. than Pineapple Express.

  2. "The Dark Knight". I think it's cool that Roeper put this movie so high on the list. It was a very well done super-hero movie. And, I saw something that said the Golden Globes snubbed it in a lot of ways. I'll have to check out the Globe nominations to comment. Bale is a great Batman, and the rest of the supporting cast are perhaps the best in any movie all year (Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, Aaron Eackhart, etc.)

  3. "The Wrestler". I'm looking forward to seeing this. Mickey Rourke will definately get a Best Actor Oscar nomination. I get the feeling it won't be half as good as "Requiem For a Heavyweight," about an ex-boxer (and written by Twilight Zone's Rod Serling).

  4. "In Bruges". This movie is good, but also overrated. Part of the problem is it goes from an interesting dark comedy, with two interesting characters (hit men that say interesting/funny things, similar to Travolta/Samuel Jackson in Pulp Fiction). The end just becomes so ridiculous. And...it has the best midget scenes of any movie of the last five years!

  5. "I've Loved You So Long". I wanted to see this, but didn't get the chance. I loved the actress in English Patient, Horse Whisperer, and a few other things I've seen her in.

  6. "Gran Torino". Clint Eastwood says this is the last movie he'll ever star in. Very strange that someone that old would continue to direct, but not act. I'd think directing is tougher. I haven't seen this, because I don't think it's out yet.

  7. "Milk". Good movie. Overrated by the critics. And the gays. But it's a thousand times better than Brokeback Mountain, which was crap. It's always more enjoyable watching a bio-pic when you don't know much about the characters portrayed. Extra points for them being accurate (I'm looking forward to seeing Cadillac Records, but have already read that they've distorted the facts of some of the musicians on the Chess label).

  8. "The Visitor". I loved this movie. It would be in my Top 10. Some people might think it's slow. Or predictable. I don't think it's either of those things.

  9. "Forgetting Sarah Marshall". I didn't think I'd like this, because it's hard to have sympathy for someone that has a bad break-up, and they can't just move on. And what point do you label them a stalker, or just tell them to get over it and find someone else. But, the character is smart enough, and funny enough, that we do feel bad for him. And we root for him. The conversations with his brother (Bill Hader from Saturday Night Live), are LOL funny.

  10. "Frozen River". An okay movie, but another indie picture that critics feel they have to love. A woman with a dead beat ex-husband and kids she can't buy Christmas gifts for, decides to help an Indian woman smuggle people across the border. It's very slow, and doesn't tug at your heart as much as it should.

  11. "Doubt". I have no idea what this movie is.

  12. "Snow Angels". This movie would be in my Top 10. Very, very dark. But very interesting and entertaining. The actor (can't think of his name), was so amazing in Half-Nelson, and equally good here. I hope the Oscars remember him.

  13. "Frost/Nixon". I'm hit and miss with Ron Howard movies. And, I'm burned out on Nixon movies. I'm going to skip this one.

  14. "The Reader". I have to see this. I mean...it's called THE READER. And, Kate Winslet never lets me down (did anyone see that movie from a few years ago, where she hangs out in the park with other housewives? it was great).

  15. "Seven Pounds". I keep seeing commercials for this. And, I have no clue what it's even about. If it gets good reviews I'll check it out.

  16. "Iron Man". I liked this movie so much more than I expected to. It would make my Top 25, for sure. Am I the only one that didn't think Jeff Bridges would turn out to be a bad guy? And am I the only one that doesn't find Gwyneth Paltrow all that attractive? And, I really can't believe that Robert Downey, Jr. was able to turn his life around. He had so many arrests over the years, I had given up hope.

  17. "Vicky Cristina Barcelona". I can name 5 Woody Allen movies that would make my Top 50 all-time movie list. But why do people still think he's this cinematic genius? This movie was enjoyable to watch, but it was really crap. The story would've never happened (Javier Barden approaching Scarlett Johanssen and her friend asking if they would be interested in a threesome). Both are married, but Scarlett goes for him. And, their conversations aren't that interesting. I mean, because he cries when he watches a flamenco guitarist, we're supposed to believe that would get a woman in the sack? And for his ex...Penelope Cruz to show up (she'll be nominated for an Oscar for this, and I'm not sure why) and act insane. Why would he even deal with that? The movie is so annoying. I did love seeing Barcelona, though.

  18. "W." I don't see Oliver Stone movies. He's like Michael Moore. He has an agenda, and therefore, doesn't make movies that I bother seeing. AND I'M A DEMOCRAT!

  19. "Henry Poole Is Here" Is this a porno, or a regular film?

  20. "Burn After Reading". This would be in my Top 10 of the year. I saw it three times (although once was at a dollar theatre in Hawaii, with people that hadn't seen it).

  21. "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button". The commercials look great. And Brad Pitt is really a great actor. I'm sure it will be nominated for make-up Oscars (Pitt is born an old man, and gradually becomes young...taken from, I believe, an F. Scott Fitzgerald short story).

  22. "WALL-E". I don't watch animated movies, unless I'm babysitting kids. And my stepbrother, that loves animated movies, was disappointed with this.

  23. "The Bank Job". On my stepbrothers birthday, a bunch of us went to see this. I liked it a lot more than I thought I would. I'm guessing it would make my Top 25 of the year. I did cringe when the bad guys were smashing a number of XKE's. Was that really necesary, people?

  24. "Tropic Thunder". I saw this at a Reader premiere. I'm not sure how it can be on anyones list for the best of the year. I laughed enough to say it was worth watching. Robert Downey Jr. is worth the price of admission alone. And the way the movie starts with the fake trailors, is brilliant. And it makes the rapper, who does a video about how much he likes womens breats...even funnier later in the movie when he comes out of the closet.

  25. "Che". Haven't seen it. I heard it's so long, the movie is going to have an intermission. Benico will probably get a nomination for this.

More like this:

Comments
10

So you thought Brokeback Mountain was “crap”...? Oh, not enough car chases? too few machine gun shootings? not enough murders? Not even one single explosion?! … that movie really sucked!

Well, like many, I thought Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain was a masterfully directed & acted work of art, a truly exceptional and genuine “Masterpiece”. Brokeback Mountain is certainly one of the very best and most touching films I have ever seen in my life, and I am 47. Since its release 3 years ago, that movie has reached the “legendary” status, and is now a cult movie for people from all walks of life. It was undeniably one of the most talked about and most important films of the last 20 years. Brokeback Mountain represents a watershed in American cinematic history, not only for its subject matter, but also and mostly for the truthfulness, the subtlety, and the overall high quality of its treatment.

BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN was deservedly named "BEST PICTURE” of 2005 over 30 times (!!!) around the world and stands as one of the most decorated films in the history of cinema.

I would say that’s not too bad for “crap”.

Dec. 12, 2008

Brokeback Mountain is like Romeo & Juliet, only with gay cowboys instead of rich teenagers, right? Love forbidden by the society of the lovers, and whatnot...yeah, yeah, yeah...been there, done that.

I think Tropic Thunder would have been a great Saturday Night Live sketch...there are about 5 minutes of funny in there. The other 1.5-or-so-hours are 1.5-or-so-hours of your life you can never have back.

I gotta see Burn After Reading...I love them Coen brothers, and if the Crasher made time for 3 viewings, it must be good.

BTW, Josh, I'm going to go out on a limb and say Doubt won't interest you. Except maybe if you have a man crush on Philip Seymour Hoffman, or your parents were cruel enough to send you to Catholic school (which would likely be correlated with your man crush on Philip Seymour Hoffman).

On the Dark Knight, my favorite line on that movie was from someecards.com, "the only thing creepier than Heath Ledger's performance was the studio's exploitation of Heath Ledger's performance." And whatever happened to Christian Bale's arrest for assaulting his mother and sister? I always wanted more details from that story, but the details never emerged. Where are the tabloids when you need 'em?

Dec. 12, 2008

Bale was cleared on those charges. I heard that, but not all the juicy details.

I was looking forward to Doubt. It looks interesting. Here's my problem with it, though. First, the trailers give away too much. Second, I'm seeing a major flaw. The movie is trying to build up this thing where we are SURE that Hoffman molested a child in his office and is now covering it up, by not explaining to Meryl Street why he had a private meeting with the boy. Yet, how hard would it be if he DID NOT molest the child, to simply say "Well...the boy was having problems being picked on, and I told him a few things about how to stand up for himself." My problem with movies is that often times, if one character just explained something in 30 seconds to the other character, there'd be no conflict or confusion. That's what people do in real life.

Regarding Brokeback Mountain....great cinematography, great acting.

Here are the problems: the only scene you ever feel sad about, is when he touches his jacket at the end and cries. That was emotional.

I have no sympathy for these guys, for the following reasons:

The way they met wasn't romantic. It was almost like a rape scene in Deliverance! And no, you don't have to be gay to think two men could be "romantic". I'm not...and in Milk, we root for his relatinship with Franco, because they have a nice rapport together and "chemistry".

We are supposed to hate Randy Quaid, for not hiring the guy back. Yet, those guys didn't do their job. They lit the sheep get eaten by the wolves, because they were in a tent messing around. Yet, the movie is trying to make this deep statement about "oh...in that day and age, gay people weren't hired for jobs if they were gay." Maybe. And that's horrible. But ya know what? The simple fact is...they didn't do their job.

Second, why do I have sympathy for them not being able to share a life together...when they treat their respective women like crap?

The music in the movie was horrible. It ranks up there with Driving Miss Daisy. It sticks in your head, and it's bad.

When the one guy punches another in the street, simply because he's angry he can't be with his true love. Well, that just shows him to be an uncontrollable jerk. In fact, didn't he almost punch his wife? Hard for me to enjoy a movie about two guys that act the way they did.

There was nothing all that interesting in the dialog, unlike Milk, where you are enjoying what characters are saying with each other...whether that is about a relationship, politics of the day, or whatever.

Dec. 12, 2008

JB griped:

"My problem with movies is that often times, if one character just explained something in 30 seconds to the other character, there'd be no conflict or confusion. That's what people do in real life."

Then "I've Loved You So Long" is REALLY going to irritate you.

:)

I agree that Brokeback had some apparent problems. In fact, I thought most of the same things about 'exactly' the issues you mention.

But I don't think they read that way to those who understand that being in a situation where there is UNANIMOUS disapproval --not just disapproval, but HATE of who you ARE -- society in general and even your own family -- can make a person downright crazy.

You've never experienced anything even remotely approaching this, have you JB? Good for you. And kudos to the people who raised you.

But the repeated, unrelenting message "Don't exist" is the main ingredient in the formula for insanity. (BTW, if you happen to add the ingredient of sexual abuse in there, it's pretty much a guarantee. In my humble but rather well-informed opinion.)

Ennis (Ledger) is in love with Jack (Gyllenhall) almost immediately. And he hates him at the same time.

This is, to say the least, a complicated relationship. And not just in the obvious, surface-oriented ways.

Ennis loves Jack because Jack represents hope, enthusiasm for life and a glimpse of the possibility of happiness. Jack is a human lifeline for Ennis that Ennis needs desperately, but is too afraid to grab onto with both hands. Despite perhaps appearing the "softer" man of the two, Jack represents something Ennis cannot muster within himself -- courage. And Ennis despises himself for being too much of a coward to take the leap of faith that Jack demands. He turns this frustration against Jack and the world in general.

Humans have a tendency to have a VERY strong, completely irrational reaction to those who reflect the rejected parts of ourselves back at us. Ennis does NOT want to be gay. He has at first denied it to himself, then tried to extinguish the fact of it since the moment he became aware of it.

Jack is a mirror that reflects Ennis's own gay self back at him. Ennis has a basic conflict between natural, inborn self-love/self-preservation and the vicious self-hate that's developed inside him as a result of his societal/familial environment.

And a then 25-year-old actor, working in the Canadian mountains in the summer of 2004, GOT IT. Ledger might not even have been able to articulate it, but whether by intellectual analysis, through personal experience, or by the purely emotion-based instinct of a truly great actor, he GOT it.

How do we know? Because he put it onscreen for all time.

Dec. 12, 2008

Danny boy, Brokeback mountain is crrrrrrrrrrrrap! the book was equally pitiful and self indulgent trash. Another crappy film adapted from an overrated and crappy book is Cold Mountain.Award ceremonies are like popularity polls which is why they don't really count or reflect the quality of a film.

Dec. 12, 2008

i guess brokeback, like all movies, works for some people and doesn't work for others. but for those who get it, brokeback really seems to pack some power and meaning. so it has to get props. i haven't seen it, but the debate above has sold me on checking it out. and i feel stupid for my Romeo & Juliet comparison above - brokeback certainly seems to have a whole lot more going on.

Dec. 12, 2008

Since the discussion has obviously turned toward the essential & exceptional Brokeback Mountain, I would refer readers to this comment on IMDB by "Prince" dated May 24, 2008:

A DEEPLY MOVING FILM - AN EXCEPTIONAL ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT!

Over the years, I have seen lots of films of very diverse origins. I don’t watch movies to be sermonized, lectured and preached upon. I don’t like to be pushed around and manipulated by frantic editing, by an artificially fast rhythm, or by incessant music. I have come to appreciate truthfulness & subtlety in art and in film: the beauty of a smile, the intensity of a glance, the profound meaning of silence.

“Brokeback Mountain is an extraordinarily special film. One of the most touching love stories in decades, Brokeback Mountain slowly weaves its magic, moving forward at a languid pace and ever so gently working its way into your heart. There’s no rushing into the film, no need to fill every moment with dialogue. Some movies take their time laying the story out and settling over the audience. Brokeback Mountain is one of those films. […] One of the most beautiful love stories to hit the screen in years, Brokeback Mountain is as close to being a perfect film as you can get.” (from “Brokeback Mountain - A Truly Memorable Love Story”, Movie Review by Rebecca Murray, About.com).

I must say that though I had read the brilliant set of Annie Proulx’s short stories (“Close Range: Wyoming Stories”) prior to the release of Ang Lee’s film, I was not prepared for what awaited me when I saw Brokeback Mountain for the first time almost 2½ years ago. I was floored, transfixed, shattered, speechless. Since I share the feelings expressed by “carr-6 from Sweden” on April 12, I’m tempted to quote her: “My whole life will be divided into before Brokeback and after Brokeback. It quite literally changed my life. I was rocked to my core. The movie took over my head and my heart and I will never be the same. No movie has ever or will ever impact on me like this.”

After its glorious victory at the Venice International Film Festival, Ang Lee’s unforgettable masterpiece was highly anticipated and, it lived up to the expectations. I have seen this film more times than any other film and, each time, I have inevitably been deeply moved.

BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN was named BEST PICTURE of 2005 by more than 30 groups, guilds & organizations around the world, and deservedly so. This film requires a certain maturity and open-mindedness from the viewer and might therefore not be everyone’s cup of tea, but there is no denying that this film made history and is already a true classic. Brokeback Mountain does not fit the typical Hollywood mold and stands without a doubt as one of the most exceptional and best movies in the history of cinema. Very highly recommended.

Posted by Prince on IMDB, 24 May 2008

Dec. 12, 2008

anti....you bring up some very good points.

daniel...i actually liked the pacing of the film. it's the same thing that happened when i said Lost in Translation was so overrated. people thought i hated the slow pacing of it. that was one of the things I liked about Lost in Translation. i just thought it had other cliche scenes and jokes we've seen a million times, and other things that didn't work.

i liked the slow pacing of Let the Right One In...yet it wasn't a great movie, as critics seem to think.

Dec. 13, 2008

@ joshb, I’m glad you took the time to reply and send your thoughts. You see, I’m a University Professor in a an Arts Faculty and oftentimes in art, there is more than meets the eye, and I think that Brokeback Mountain belongs to that category of works. In many ways, Brokeback Mountain belongs more to the tradition of brilliant foreign films such as “Babette’s Feast”, “Wings of Desire” (Der Himmel über Berlin), “The Piano”, “Au revoir les enfants”, etc. Perhaps you didn’t like BBM; it is not the type of movie that everyone likes, especially in America, but does that make it “crap”? Some people don’t like the music of Beethoven or Debussy, but does that make it crap? Is it thus less valuable and important in the history of music? Regarding BBM, one can rationalize and debate various scenes, one can agree or not with the behaviour of the protagonists, but in the end, we can’t deny, as illustrated by the quotes I sent you earlier, that this film had a major impact on the lives of many film and has touched a lot a people very deeply. Some got it… and some simply didn’t get it. That’s normal.

Beyond personal preferences, one has to acknowledge that Brokeback Mountain is a landmark film. Its impact has been absolutely historical in scope and undeniable. Rarely have we seen a film have such an impact on society, in the media, and with the general public, even on those who haven't seen it or did not have the courage to go see it. I regularly read articles that mention the terms “pre-Brokeback” or “post-Brokeback”. There is thus before, and there is after. Several books have since been published on the subject: “Beyond Brokeback – The Impact of a Film”, “Reading Brokeback Mounatin – Essays on the Story and the Film”, “On Brokeback Mountain – Meditations about Masculinity, Fear, and Love in the Story and the Film”, etc. Numerous papers have been written by scholars who have studied the Brokeback phenomenon on various levels. I think that what makes this film (and the brilliant short story by Annie Proulx) so special and so great, is that everything is not said, nor explained. It is a film with many layers and it carries implications on various levels. The screenwriters and the director put their trust in the viewer to put the pieces together and, ultimately, to “feel” the power of this heart wrenching story. Brokeback Mountain has irrefutably been THE “Movie Event” of 2005 and we will remain a milestone in cinematic history.

Dec. 13, 2008

Daniel my brother....I gots to ask. Who doesn't like Beethoven? And, Debussy is crap (okay, aside from Nocturnes).

But, movies are the one art form that I really don't think is open for intrepetation.

Paints, yes. Music, yes. But not movies. Nope.

Take a horrible comedy. A comedy that everyone agrees is just not funny. It might appeal to a 12-year-old with a learning disability. Would you be able to claim that it just depends on ones taste?

Sure, a movie like Pulp Fiction might be to graphic for some. And some might find the comedy of a, say, Adam Sandler not for them. But if Sandler was in a great comedy (say...Tootsie, Some Like It Hot, etc...well, it would still be a great comedy, and one would sound foolish to disagree, no?)

My problem with Brokeback was the extreme hype it got. Maybe it was the first movie to fully explore the themes it did. But, I think of it in the same way I think of Halle Berry winning the Oscar a few years back, and talking about how she opened all these doors for African-Americans (last I checked, Denzel and Portier, had won Oscars many years before her...and they're not even half-black, like she is!). But if she thinks she opened doors, and people were so moved by Brokeback because it was the first movie to really explore a love story between homosexuals, okay.

Regarding everything being explained...I actually like when movies don't tell us everything (not in a contrived way, like in Lost in Translation when Murray whispers in Scarletts ear...that was just flat out lame, and didn't pack the punch for me that it did for some insane critics out there).

I just saw the vampire movie LET THE RIGHT ONE IN. And, many things weren't explained. And I found that interesting (things like why the girl vampire had stitches near her private parts...why on older man that wasn't a vampire went out and retrieved blood for her, etc).

And, I'd like to thank you for responding to all this. I've enjoyed reading all you've had to say on the subject. Your students are lucky.

Dec. 15, 2008

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