Anchor ads are not supported on this page.

4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Gonzo Report: Corey Feldman opens for himself at House of Blues

Probably not good, but definitely fun

Corey Feldman: an entirely different dimension of rock and roll weirdness.
Corey Feldman: an entirely different dimension of rock and roll weirdness.

Years ago, I watched a full band open for comedian David Cross at ‘Cane’s in Mission Beach. I thought it was the most unusual opening act/headliner combo I had ever witnessed — at least until I was subjected to a full screening of the 1987 film The Lost Boys as the warm-up act for Corey Feldman’s concert at the downtown House of Blues. For those not in the know, Feldman was a 1980s child actor best known for the aforementioned Lost Boys, The Goonies, Stand By Me, and License to Drive. Those in attendance who may have been unaware of or forgotten this were then treated to a not-so-abridged intro video that detailed his entire career. One interesting fun-fact was that, at some point, he had collaborated with Ringo Starr.

If I had stumbled upon this stage randomly at a festival, I would have had no clue as to the type of artist that was about to perform. The crowd was all over the map, with old headbangers, punks, squares, and even a random female in a white fluffy jacket that came equipped with its own working light bulbs. This audience seemed like a true cross-section of the American experience, and what’s more American than witnessing a mixed bag of U.S. citizens launch their cell phones into the air to record a former child star performing his first song of the night? The fact that this song happened to be called “Comeback King” was the cherry on top of the cultural sundae.

The somewhat bombastic song (which featured a guest rapper who I momentarily thought might have been fellow former child star Todd Bridges) was followed by “Arm Me With Love,” a fun little chugging rock song that seemed inspired by The Beatles. Feldman played a harmonica during his vocal breaks, and the crowd seemed to dig it. The funk-guitar infused “Raising the Vibration” was followed by “Something In Your Eyes,” Feldman’s first single, which he performed at the 1989 Nickelodeon Kid’s Choice Awards. Of course, that vintage footage was showcased on the big screen.

Sponsored
Sponsored

So: the first four songs seemed to go pretty well, and the audience was enjoying themselves. But it was at this point that Feldman stepped away from the spotlight and let the other four members of his band take turns on lead vocals. The songs themselves shifted from originals to (not great) covers of songs that had (of course) been featured in Feldman’s 1980s movies. The female keyboardist sang “The Goonies ‘R’ Good Enough” from The Goonies, and the drummer sang “Stand By Me” from the film of the same name. Feldman played drums during “Stand By Me,” and stayed behind the kit to knock out a cover of The Beatles’ “Why Don’t We Do It In The Road,” which he sang as well. He also made sure to alert the audience as to how difficult it was to sing and play drums at the same time.

Seeing as how a sizable chunk of the audience started heading towards the exit during this song, it seemed like a good time to reflect on how incredibly weird this show was. I had seen Devo the previous weekend, a very weird Ohio band that stumbled upon fame in the late ‘70s. But this Corey Feldman show was an entirely different dimension of rock and roll weirdness. The Michael Jackson dance moves, the sparkly jackets and numerous wardrobe changes, actor Jamison Newlander (one of the Frog brothers from The Lost Boys) featured as a guest vocalist, Feldman’s dismay over his guitarist tuning up at one point, and his between-song story about a San Diego “Lost Boys Ball” gig getting cancelled because the venue’s roof caved in. And, above all else, the intense fascination that Feldman seems to have for his days as a child actor. It’s a trait that many of those who showed up likely shared, and one which Ashley, a 38-year-old woman in attendance, summed up for me as people “just wanting to see Corey Feldman in real life.” She added, “I would say this is made for people who watched Lost Boys in, like, elementary and middle school probably.”

As far as musical nostalgia trips go, it was about as out there as you could get — so unique and original in its own strange way that it had a performance art appeal to it. Was Feldman’s over-the-top rockstar persona authentic, or an act? If it was an act, was it the greatest performance of Feldman’s career? Prior to the band hitting the stage, I asked an attendee named Tom what he thought the show would be like. “Probably not good, but it will be fun.” He nailed it.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Sitting On Stacy, Matte Blvck, Zack Oakley, Hexa, Jakobs Castle

Rock & roll, record release, flood benefit, and Sublime’s new lead singer
Next Article

For sale: 9000 square foot house on two acres in Del Mar

It’s the second priciest ZIP code in San Diego
Corey Feldman: an entirely different dimension of rock and roll weirdness.
Corey Feldman: an entirely different dimension of rock and roll weirdness.

Years ago, I watched a full band open for comedian David Cross at ‘Cane’s in Mission Beach. I thought it was the most unusual opening act/headliner combo I had ever witnessed — at least until I was subjected to a full screening of the 1987 film The Lost Boys as the warm-up act for Corey Feldman’s concert at the downtown House of Blues. For those not in the know, Feldman was a 1980s child actor best known for the aforementioned Lost Boys, The Goonies, Stand By Me, and License to Drive. Those in attendance who may have been unaware of or forgotten this were then treated to a not-so-abridged intro video that detailed his entire career. One interesting fun-fact was that, at some point, he had collaborated with Ringo Starr.

If I had stumbled upon this stage randomly at a festival, I would have had no clue as to the type of artist that was about to perform. The crowd was all over the map, with old headbangers, punks, squares, and even a random female in a white fluffy jacket that came equipped with its own working light bulbs. This audience seemed like a true cross-section of the American experience, and what’s more American than witnessing a mixed bag of U.S. citizens launch their cell phones into the air to record a former child star performing his first song of the night? The fact that this song happened to be called “Comeback King” was the cherry on top of the cultural sundae.

The somewhat bombastic song (which featured a guest rapper who I momentarily thought might have been fellow former child star Todd Bridges) was followed by “Arm Me With Love,” a fun little chugging rock song that seemed inspired by The Beatles. Feldman played a harmonica during his vocal breaks, and the crowd seemed to dig it. The funk-guitar infused “Raising the Vibration” was followed by “Something In Your Eyes,” Feldman’s first single, which he performed at the 1989 Nickelodeon Kid’s Choice Awards. Of course, that vintage footage was showcased on the big screen.

Sponsored
Sponsored

So: the first four songs seemed to go pretty well, and the audience was enjoying themselves. But it was at this point that Feldman stepped away from the spotlight and let the other four members of his band take turns on lead vocals. The songs themselves shifted from originals to (not great) covers of songs that had (of course) been featured in Feldman’s 1980s movies. The female keyboardist sang “The Goonies ‘R’ Good Enough” from The Goonies, and the drummer sang “Stand By Me” from the film of the same name. Feldman played drums during “Stand By Me,” and stayed behind the kit to knock out a cover of The Beatles’ “Why Don’t We Do It In The Road,” which he sang as well. He also made sure to alert the audience as to how difficult it was to sing and play drums at the same time.

Seeing as how a sizable chunk of the audience started heading towards the exit during this song, it seemed like a good time to reflect on how incredibly weird this show was. I had seen Devo the previous weekend, a very weird Ohio band that stumbled upon fame in the late ‘70s. But this Corey Feldman show was an entirely different dimension of rock and roll weirdness. The Michael Jackson dance moves, the sparkly jackets and numerous wardrobe changes, actor Jamison Newlander (one of the Frog brothers from The Lost Boys) featured as a guest vocalist, Feldman’s dismay over his guitarist tuning up at one point, and his between-song story about a San Diego “Lost Boys Ball” gig getting cancelled because the venue’s roof caved in. And, above all else, the intense fascination that Feldman seems to have for his days as a child actor. It’s a trait that many of those who showed up likely shared, and one which Ashley, a 38-year-old woman in attendance, summed up for me as people “just wanting to see Corey Feldman in real life.” She added, “I would say this is made for people who watched Lost Boys in, like, elementary and middle school probably.”

As far as musical nostalgia trips go, it was about as out there as you could get — so unique and original in its own strange way that it had a performance art appeal to it. Was Feldman’s over-the-top rockstar persona authentic, or an act? If it was an act, was it the greatest performance of Feldman’s career? Prior to the band hitting the stage, I asked an attendee named Tom what he thought the show would be like. “Probably not good, but it will be fun.” He nailed it.

Comments
Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Wing Wars: Chicken Wing Crawl Competition, Thrift Store Treasure Bazaar

Events March 9-March 13, 2024
Next Article

Otay Ranch mom muses on silly North County dads

People in general don’t hate Priuses
Comments
Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox Movies@Home — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close

Anchor ads are not supported on this page.