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3 The Point in the Coronado Cays rivals the choicest units in Manhattan

Is that a mini golf course on the roof?

People who live in glass houses sometimes have a great deal of money.
People who live in glass houses sometimes have a great deal of money.

Good real estate buyer’s agents spend a lot of time on the internet searching on behalf of their clients. Sure, it might sound simple enough to meet a client’s needs — plug in preferred bed/bath counts, square footage, price range, a handful of ZIP codes, and set up an automatic alert for matching properties. Heck, you can do the same thing for yourself on Zillow.

However, this is only a partial strategy. Try as we might for precision and care, sometimes agents will mis-enter a key statistic that results in the perfect house flying under the radar, just because it doesn’t make it into the auto-generated roundup emails that go out to prospective buyers. The only way to avoid this is to do a manual search once a week or so, leaving off one parameter or tweaking another to check for unexpected results.

Something similar happened when I was trying to find a property to write about this week. We haven’t toured any condos here lately, so I set off in search of the priciest attached units in the county. Normally, this would net a penthouse downtown, near Balboa Park, or maybe somewhere in La Jolla. And while we’ve got plenty of eight-figure single family homes in San Diego, luxury condos in town start around the $2 million mark and rarely eclipse $10 million.

The stairs, because coming down for dinner should be an event, darn it.

So when I saw that there was an active attached listing for $43 million, I figured it was a typo — surely some new agent meant to list a starter unit for $430,000 and didn’t know that the local MLS asks you to input your asking price in thousands rather than dollars. This isn’t uncommon, and I once got a young couple into a unit in El Cajon that no one else saw due to a similar blunder.

Wait, this is for a listing in Coronado, notorious playground of the wealthy? Maybe this is the actual list price, and I’ve found a condo here in our own backyard commanding a price that rivals the choicest units in Manhattan?

Yes and no. The price for this home is correct, but I can’t figure out why it’s listed under the “all other attached homes” classification. There is a homeowners’ association with authority over the Coronado Cays (just south of the main village on the Silver Strand heading south to Imperial Beach), but public records say this is a single-family home on a third-acre lot zoned for only one unit. In any case, I’m putting off the condo search for a couple of weeks, because right now I want to introduce you to 3 The Point.

“Newly constructed in 2021, this singularly impressive residence spans over 11,700 square feet encompassing seven bedrooms (each with a private balcony), 11 luxurious baths, and a stunningly appointed, technically sophisticated theater,” the Zillow remarks begin. That’s a lot of space to take in, so let’s get to the tour.

Our first photo is an aerial view showcasing the “over 320 feet of private bayfront” that gives us room for not one but two boat docks (95 and 60 feet in length, respectively). I’m not sure from this vantage point, but it almost looks like the house is floating above a giant outdoor covered patio on the ground level. And is that a mini golf course on the roof?

A couple shots later we get to a view from directly overhead, and yes, it looks like not only is there a pitch-and-putt golf area, there’s also a swimming pool on the roof, directly behind a second pool on the ground level.

From the glass entry doors, we can see straight through the lower level, past a spiraling staircase and out to the bay beyond — apparently, at least part of the first floor is enclosed; they’re just using glass walls to get the job done.

There’s a pleasant outdoor seating area in back with a fireplace, and from here ,we can catch a glimpse of the al fresco kitchen in the background. We get some more shots of the ground-level pool and a second firepit before heading inside.

There’s that staircase again, standing alone in what I assume is an oversized entry foyer and a third fireplace next to an eight-seat dining table. Wait, another angle shows us there’s a grand piano hiding behind the stairs. The fact that something the size of a grand piano could be completely obscured from a couple steps away should convey just how commanding these stairs are.

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Sponsored

The space is a little sterile for my taste, though I do appreciate the stonework on both the interior and exterior walls. And the amount of glass we’re seeing, from the giant windows to the balconies to the stair railings, seems like it would require a full-employment guarantee for a small army of window washers, plus at least one production line at the Windex factory.

Next we’re up on the roof, looking past a hot tub to the secondary pool, which doesn’t seem quite deep enough for swimming. It does, however, boast a handful of semi-submerged concrete lounges that are either incredibly luxurious or obnoxiously uncomfortable. “This expansive rooftop deck provides ample room for both entertaining and indulgent relaxation in a setting that creates an extraordinary sense of tranquility,” the listing promises. That’s a lot of word wrangling to say “It’s fancy,” but I won’t begrudge the point.

Back inside, we see your typical home theater (typical, at least, if you’ve seen half as many of these homes as I’ve written about) before moving on to a kitchen that, while elegant, isn’t nearly as overdone as some others I’ve observed.

We then get a bedroom with a sitting area and its own private deck. Wait, I just remembered that every single bedroom has its own private deck, so this one might not even be the primary suite. Perhaps it is, though, as there’s a bathroom with a shower enclosure so large that a freestanding tub sits off to one side and doesn’t even occupy a third of the space. There’s also a walk-in closet/dressing room with its own loveseat and what seems to me to be a shelves-to-drawers ratio that’s ridiculously lopsided.

We also see a small office, a bar with a backlit wall of wine bottles, a billiards room, and what I’m assuming is a gym, though it features only a rowing machine and a handful of yoga mats. Then it’s a speed run through some other bedrooms and baths; the latter are serviceable, save for the oddly curved walls, and nowhere near as opulent as the first one we saw.

A quick peek at the outdoor kitchen and the four-car garage (with glass garage doors, no less), and our tour comes to an abrupt end. “Striking contemporary design, connection to its coastal environs, technical sophistication and meticulously crafted construction. This is one of a kind. This is ‘3 The Point,’” the listing concludes.

Public records list a Thad Call of Utah as the estate’s current owner. The last recorded sale was in 2014 at a price just under $8.6 million; since then, the 7500-square-foot mansion (that itself was just built in 1988!) that occupied the site has been torn down to make way for the manse that we just toured.

3 The Point was listed just a couple of weeks ago in mid-November. If you’ve got $43 million and this sounds like a good way to spend it, please let me know how those pool lounge chairs actually feel.

3 the point | Coronado, 92118

Current owner: Call Trust | Listing price: $43,000,000 | Beds: 7 | Baths: 11 | House size: 11,700 sq ft


Note from author Dave Rice:

The price for this home is correct, but I can’t figure out why it’s listed under the “all other attached homes” classification. Update: it's now showing up correctly as a single-family detached home.

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People who live in glass houses sometimes have a great deal of money.
People who live in glass houses sometimes have a great deal of money.

Good real estate buyer’s agents spend a lot of time on the internet searching on behalf of their clients. Sure, it might sound simple enough to meet a client’s needs — plug in preferred bed/bath counts, square footage, price range, a handful of ZIP codes, and set up an automatic alert for matching properties. Heck, you can do the same thing for yourself on Zillow.

However, this is only a partial strategy. Try as we might for precision and care, sometimes agents will mis-enter a key statistic that results in the perfect house flying under the radar, just because it doesn’t make it into the auto-generated roundup emails that go out to prospective buyers. The only way to avoid this is to do a manual search once a week or so, leaving off one parameter or tweaking another to check for unexpected results.

Something similar happened when I was trying to find a property to write about this week. We haven’t toured any condos here lately, so I set off in search of the priciest attached units in the county. Normally, this would net a penthouse downtown, near Balboa Park, or maybe somewhere in La Jolla. And while we’ve got plenty of eight-figure single family homes in San Diego, luxury condos in town start around the $2 million mark and rarely eclipse $10 million.

The stairs, because coming down for dinner should be an event, darn it.

So when I saw that there was an active attached listing for $43 million, I figured it was a typo — surely some new agent meant to list a starter unit for $430,000 and didn’t know that the local MLS asks you to input your asking price in thousands rather than dollars. This isn’t uncommon, and I once got a young couple into a unit in El Cajon that no one else saw due to a similar blunder.

Wait, this is for a listing in Coronado, notorious playground of the wealthy? Maybe this is the actual list price, and I’ve found a condo here in our own backyard commanding a price that rivals the choicest units in Manhattan?

Yes and no. The price for this home is correct, but I can’t figure out why it’s listed under the “all other attached homes” classification. There is a homeowners’ association with authority over the Coronado Cays (just south of the main village on the Silver Strand heading south to Imperial Beach), but public records say this is a single-family home on a third-acre lot zoned for only one unit. In any case, I’m putting off the condo search for a couple of weeks, because right now I want to introduce you to 3 The Point.

“Newly constructed in 2021, this singularly impressive residence spans over 11,700 square feet encompassing seven bedrooms (each with a private balcony), 11 luxurious baths, and a stunningly appointed, technically sophisticated theater,” the Zillow remarks begin. That’s a lot of space to take in, so let’s get to the tour.

Our first photo is an aerial view showcasing the “over 320 feet of private bayfront” that gives us room for not one but two boat docks (95 and 60 feet in length, respectively). I’m not sure from this vantage point, but it almost looks like the house is floating above a giant outdoor covered patio on the ground level. And is that a mini golf course on the roof?

A couple shots later we get to a view from directly overhead, and yes, it looks like not only is there a pitch-and-putt golf area, there’s also a swimming pool on the roof, directly behind a second pool on the ground level.

From the glass entry doors, we can see straight through the lower level, past a spiraling staircase and out to the bay beyond — apparently, at least part of the first floor is enclosed; they’re just using glass walls to get the job done.

There’s a pleasant outdoor seating area in back with a fireplace, and from here ,we can catch a glimpse of the al fresco kitchen in the background. We get some more shots of the ground-level pool and a second firepit before heading inside.

There’s that staircase again, standing alone in what I assume is an oversized entry foyer and a third fireplace next to an eight-seat dining table. Wait, another angle shows us there’s a grand piano hiding behind the stairs. The fact that something the size of a grand piano could be completely obscured from a couple steps away should convey just how commanding these stairs are.

Sponsored
Sponsored

The space is a little sterile for my taste, though I do appreciate the stonework on both the interior and exterior walls. And the amount of glass we’re seeing, from the giant windows to the balconies to the stair railings, seems like it would require a full-employment guarantee for a small army of window washers, plus at least one production line at the Windex factory.

Next we’re up on the roof, looking past a hot tub to the secondary pool, which doesn’t seem quite deep enough for swimming. It does, however, boast a handful of semi-submerged concrete lounges that are either incredibly luxurious or obnoxiously uncomfortable. “This expansive rooftop deck provides ample room for both entertaining and indulgent relaxation in a setting that creates an extraordinary sense of tranquility,” the listing promises. That’s a lot of word wrangling to say “It’s fancy,” but I won’t begrudge the point.

Back inside, we see your typical home theater (typical, at least, if you’ve seen half as many of these homes as I’ve written about) before moving on to a kitchen that, while elegant, isn’t nearly as overdone as some others I’ve observed.

We then get a bedroom with a sitting area and its own private deck. Wait, I just remembered that every single bedroom has its own private deck, so this one might not even be the primary suite. Perhaps it is, though, as there’s a bathroom with a shower enclosure so large that a freestanding tub sits off to one side and doesn’t even occupy a third of the space. There’s also a walk-in closet/dressing room with its own loveseat and what seems to me to be a shelves-to-drawers ratio that’s ridiculously lopsided.

We also see a small office, a bar with a backlit wall of wine bottles, a billiards room, and what I’m assuming is a gym, though it features only a rowing machine and a handful of yoga mats. Then it’s a speed run through some other bedrooms and baths; the latter are serviceable, save for the oddly curved walls, and nowhere near as opulent as the first one we saw.

A quick peek at the outdoor kitchen and the four-car garage (with glass garage doors, no less), and our tour comes to an abrupt end. “Striking contemporary design, connection to its coastal environs, technical sophistication and meticulously crafted construction. This is one of a kind. This is ‘3 The Point,’” the listing concludes.

Public records list a Thad Call of Utah as the estate’s current owner. The last recorded sale was in 2014 at a price just under $8.6 million; since then, the 7500-square-foot mansion (that itself was just built in 1988!) that occupied the site has been torn down to make way for the manse that we just toured.

3 The Point was listed just a couple of weeks ago in mid-November. If you’ve got $43 million and this sounds like a good way to spend it, please let me know how those pool lounge chairs actually feel.

3 the point | Coronado, 92118

Current owner: Call Trust | Listing price: $43,000,000 | Beds: 7 | Baths: 11 | House size: 11,700 sq ft


Note from author Dave Rice:

The price for this home is correct, but I can’t figure out why it’s listed under the “all other attached homes” classification. Update: it's now showing up correctly as a single-family detached home.

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Huge amberjack caught near La Paz – Want good corbina and spotfin action away from the perch? Go south.

Bluefin and yellowtail biting early in the year within 3-day range.
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