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L.A. angst over newspaper loss not mirrored in San Diego

Jen Campbell sucks up GOP money

Eileen Barish of Santa Monica opined: “Reading the news digitally takes away the contentment I feel holding the paper in my hand. I like the feel of the paper. I like turning the pages from article to article. Reading the news digitally feels like work, not pleasure.”
Eileen Barish of Santa Monica opined: “Reading the news digitally takes away the contentment I feel holding the paper in my hand. I like the feel of the paper. I like turning the pages from article to article. Reading the news digitally feels like work, not pleasure.”

Tale of two papers

News that the LA Times will be shuttering its Olympic Boulevard printing plant in a little over a year has triggered an avalanche of Angeleno angst, per a November 12 account by Times letters editor Paul Thornton. “More than a few journalists noticed pop star Katy Perry’s tweet last week saying one of her ‘favorite sounds ever is the sound of a crisp new newspaper being read over breakfast for an hour or so.’ Judging by readers’ approving reaction to a short letter on Monday imploring The Times to keep printing newspapers long into the future, Perry is far from alone,” wrote Thornton.

Katy Perry loves the sound of newsprint in the morning.

“The letter was reacting to news that The Times would leave its longtime printing plant south of downtown Los Angeles in 2024. The writer found this news concerning: ‘It was unclear in the article about the print plant shutting down as to whether you still will deliver a print version....Please keep the print paper coming. I would rather pay more than lose what has become an important part of my morning. Digital will not suffice for me.’ When this letter was published, I thought it would be a quick, one-off reaction. I was wrong — and I must admit, pleasantly so. Since Monday, many more readers have written to us expressing their appreciation for the print newspaper.”

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Headlined “Opinion: Long live printed newspapers. Digital won’t work for these readers,” the story featured a torrent of pro-print pleas, including that of Ventura’s Regina Barnes. “I wholeheartedly agree with the letter writer who asked that the LA Times keep providing a print version of the paper. I abhor the digital version. The feel of the paper, turning the pages, focusing on each headline, brings such comfort. I, too, would be willing to pay more for the print version, which I think I do anyway. Please keep in mind that there are people who love the print version and would be heartsick if it was discontinued.”

Wrote Linda Cooper of Studio City: “It’s not just because I’m set in my ways, but I feel that the printed version of a newspaper is much more interesting, enticing, and educational. The loss of the paper every morning would leave a huge deficit in my day.” Eileen Barish of Santa Monica opined: “Reading the news digitally takes away the contentment I feel holding the paper in my hand. I like the feel of the paper. I like turning the pages from article to article. Reading the news digitally feels like work, not pleasure. I am not sure if closing the print plant will affect the delivery of papers, but I, for one, vote to keep the print paper for subscribers. I’d be happy to pay more if that’s what it would take to keep receiving my paper every morning.”

Besides the Times, the doomed Los Angeles plant produces the San Diego Union-Tribune and a raft of county weeklies, also owned by Times owner Patrick Soon-Shiong. But displays of newspaper affection have gone uncelebrated by the U-T. Instead, U-T scribes and editor Jeff Light have been actively promoting the end of daily print in San Diego, leading to predictions that Soon-Shiong’s hometown Times will continue life on paper while the U-T won’t. “Many readers understood that a seven-day-a-week printed newspaper will eventually end (but that is years away), given changing reader demographics and the expense of printing and delivery,” offered U-T Readers Representative Adrian Vore in a July 12 write-up before the Olympic plant closure was announced. “Several subscribers said they have already switched to the e-edition — and like it more than print.”

Jen’s Sempra romance

San Diego City council Sempra-friendly Democrat Jen Campbell, who beat her Republican challenger Linda Lukacs despite the endorsement of Lukacs by the circulation-challenged Union-Tribune, collected plenty of big GOP and lobbyist money during the closing days of the campaign, disclosure records show. Colton Sudberry, president of Sudberry Properties — founded by his father, Republican heavy hitter and Mission Valley developer Tom Sudberry — kicked in $650 on October 24. The next day, influence peddler Adrian Kwiatkowski gave $650, and on October 31, lobbyist Jim Bartell gave the same.

Sempra semper fi? Jen Campbell sure hopes so!

They are affiliated with Bartell & Kwiatkowski, LLC. On October 28, Republican lobbyist Ben Haddad of California Strategies came up with $325. Haddad’s associate at the firm, Marshall Anderson, gave $650 on October 31. Builder Jim Drogin gave $650 on November 2. $200 each from Sempra Energy-related sources came on November 2 through SDG&E chairman and CEO Bruce Folkmann, SDG&E Vice President of Climate and Wildfire Brian Dagostino, and SDG&E accountant Valerie Bille.

Beyond the last-minute appearance of staff cash to Campbell’s campaign, Sempra played a key role in her ultimate November victory by financing hit pieces against Campbell’s June primary opponent, fellow Democrat Lori Saldana, who lost narrowly to Lukacs for second place. In late 2021, records show, Sempra gave $2500 to a so-called independent committee called New San Diego, which dispatched hit pieces attacking Saldana, a former state Assemblywoman, for junketing at lobbyists’ expense. Other New San Diego donors included Haddad of California Strategies and Craig Benedetto of the same firm, each with $1250.

— Matt Potter

(@sdmattpotter)

The Reader offers $25 for news tips published in this column. Call our voice mail at 619-235-3000, ext. 440, or sandiegoreader.com/staff/matt-potter/contact/.

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Eileen Barish of Santa Monica opined: “Reading the news digitally takes away the contentment I feel holding the paper in my hand. I like the feel of the paper. I like turning the pages from article to article. Reading the news digitally feels like work, not pleasure.”
Eileen Barish of Santa Monica opined: “Reading the news digitally takes away the contentment I feel holding the paper in my hand. I like the feel of the paper. I like turning the pages from article to article. Reading the news digitally feels like work, not pleasure.”

Tale of two papers

News that the LA Times will be shuttering its Olympic Boulevard printing plant in a little over a year has triggered an avalanche of Angeleno angst, per a November 12 account by Times letters editor Paul Thornton. “More than a few journalists noticed pop star Katy Perry’s tweet last week saying one of her ‘favorite sounds ever is the sound of a crisp new newspaper being read over breakfast for an hour or so.’ Judging by readers’ approving reaction to a short letter on Monday imploring The Times to keep printing newspapers long into the future, Perry is far from alone,” wrote Thornton.

Katy Perry loves the sound of newsprint in the morning.

“The letter was reacting to news that The Times would leave its longtime printing plant south of downtown Los Angeles in 2024. The writer found this news concerning: ‘It was unclear in the article about the print plant shutting down as to whether you still will deliver a print version....Please keep the print paper coming. I would rather pay more than lose what has become an important part of my morning. Digital will not suffice for me.’ When this letter was published, I thought it would be a quick, one-off reaction. I was wrong — and I must admit, pleasantly so. Since Monday, many more readers have written to us expressing their appreciation for the print newspaper.”

Sponsored
Sponsored

Headlined “Opinion: Long live printed newspapers. Digital won’t work for these readers,” the story featured a torrent of pro-print pleas, including that of Ventura’s Regina Barnes. “I wholeheartedly agree with the letter writer who asked that the LA Times keep providing a print version of the paper. I abhor the digital version. The feel of the paper, turning the pages, focusing on each headline, brings such comfort. I, too, would be willing to pay more for the print version, which I think I do anyway. Please keep in mind that there are people who love the print version and would be heartsick if it was discontinued.”

Wrote Linda Cooper of Studio City: “It’s not just because I’m set in my ways, but I feel that the printed version of a newspaper is much more interesting, enticing, and educational. The loss of the paper every morning would leave a huge deficit in my day.” Eileen Barish of Santa Monica opined: “Reading the news digitally takes away the contentment I feel holding the paper in my hand. I like the feel of the paper. I like turning the pages from article to article. Reading the news digitally feels like work, not pleasure. I am not sure if closing the print plant will affect the delivery of papers, but I, for one, vote to keep the print paper for subscribers. I’d be happy to pay more if that’s what it would take to keep receiving my paper every morning.”

Besides the Times, the doomed Los Angeles plant produces the San Diego Union-Tribune and a raft of county weeklies, also owned by Times owner Patrick Soon-Shiong. But displays of newspaper affection have gone uncelebrated by the U-T. Instead, U-T scribes and editor Jeff Light have been actively promoting the end of daily print in San Diego, leading to predictions that Soon-Shiong’s hometown Times will continue life on paper while the U-T won’t. “Many readers understood that a seven-day-a-week printed newspaper will eventually end (but that is years away), given changing reader demographics and the expense of printing and delivery,” offered U-T Readers Representative Adrian Vore in a July 12 write-up before the Olympic plant closure was announced. “Several subscribers said they have already switched to the e-edition — and like it more than print.”

Jen’s Sempra romance

San Diego City council Sempra-friendly Democrat Jen Campbell, who beat her Republican challenger Linda Lukacs despite the endorsement of Lukacs by the circulation-challenged Union-Tribune, collected plenty of big GOP and lobbyist money during the closing days of the campaign, disclosure records show. Colton Sudberry, president of Sudberry Properties — founded by his father, Republican heavy hitter and Mission Valley developer Tom Sudberry — kicked in $650 on October 24. The next day, influence peddler Adrian Kwiatkowski gave $650, and on October 31, lobbyist Jim Bartell gave the same.

Sempra semper fi? Jen Campbell sure hopes so!

They are affiliated with Bartell & Kwiatkowski, LLC. On October 28, Republican lobbyist Ben Haddad of California Strategies came up with $325. Haddad’s associate at the firm, Marshall Anderson, gave $650 on October 31. Builder Jim Drogin gave $650 on November 2. $200 each from Sempra Energy-related sources came on November 2 through SDG&E chairman and CEO Bruce Folkmann, SDG&E Vice President of Climate and Wildfire Brian Dagostino, and SDG&E accountant Valerie Bille.

Beyond the last-minute appearance of staff cash to Campbell’s campaign, Sempra played a key role in her ultimate November victory by financing hit pieces against Campbell’s June primary opponent, fellow Democrat Lori Saldana, who lost narrowly to Lukacs for second place. In late 2021, records show, Sempra gave $2500 to a so-called independent committee called New San Diego, which dispatched hit pieces attacking Saldana, a former state Assemblywoman, for junketing at lobbyists’ expense. Other New San Diego donors included Haddad of California Strategies and Craig Benedetto of the same firm, each with $1250.

— Matt Potter

(@sdmattpotter)

The Reader offers $25 for news tips published in this column. Call our voice mail at 619-235-3000, ext. 440, or sandiegoreader.com/staff/matt-potter/contact/.

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