4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Sushi Yorimichi worth a detour thru Linda Vista

Tiny Japanese sit-down also covers meat skewers, ramen, and rice bowls topped with everything

The salmon and uni rice bowl, with poached chicken egg and two types of roe
The salmon and uni rice bowl, with poached chicken egg and two types of roe

This place is familiar. I used to come here back when it was the Original Sab E Lee, the locally beloved Thai restaurant that moved to a larger space across the street years ago. There wasn’t much to the property back then, and there’s not much to look at as far as the storefront is concerned. Mostly a sign that reads Sushi Yorimichi. But it feels pretty perfect inside.

Place

Sushi Yorimichi

2405 Ulric St., San Diego

At least, it does to a guy who spent his teens going to hole-in-the-wall restaurants like this, as a military brat living in Japan. Most obvious are the shoji screens, paper lanterns, and no-frills dining furniture. The sushi bar that’s more of an arched window with, wrapped pieces of fish visible inside a glass cooler case. The case has been plastered with stickers of street racers, exactly the sort of cars my high school friends used to covet. Extra cred achieved if the car possessed Toyota’s near-mythical Hachi-Roku engine.

The long ago site of The Original Sab E Lee

Before I even picked up a menu, the place feels uncannily authentic, right down to the realistic plastic models of sushi nigiri, which sit on display beside a bonsai tree.

The menu smacks authentic, too, though I’ll soon realize there are a few interesting deviations. Not only sushi, but Japanese menu items across the board: yakitori skewers, ramen, chicken karaage, monkfish liver, tempura udon, and katsudon, a breaded pork cutlet served with egg over rice: the go-to order for high school me.

Interior reminiscent of many hole-in-the-wall Japanese eateries

My tastes have broadened since then, and I’ll soon be ordering entirely too much food. This menu might feel at home in an izakaya, the sort of bar and restaurant Japanese folk typically patronize after work. The beer and sake options reenforce the idea, and maybe so does the name. The word yorimichi technically translates to detour, but as they explain to me at the restaurant, it’s colloquially used to describe a sort of spontaneous hangout over food and drinks. My kind of detour.

Car stickers cover the sushi cooler, prompting memories of Japanese street racing culture

Fusion is most evident on the noodles menu. This includes classical ramen choices featuring tonkostu (pork bone) or shoyu (soy) based broth. Bu there’s a latent Mexican-styled favorite — birria ramen ($11.25) — and an udon adaptation of Italy’s famed ham and egg pasta, carbonara ($11.50).

Intriguing though these were, we steered away from noodle altogether, choosing to focus instead on meat, seafood, and (as it turned out) eggs.

Pork belly and skirt steak yakitori

Got started with yakitori meat skewers, keeping it simple with pork belly ($2.75) and skirt steak ($3.50). If this were strictly a yakitori restaurant, I’d still recommend it. With options including ribeye, chicken liver, bacon wrapped okra, scallops, and duck, there’s plenty to snack on all day. As an appetizer, the smart thing to do is pick any four skewers for $14.50.

Next came a spider hand roll (fried softshell crab), and a yellowtail sashimi dish dressed with serrano chilis, spicy ponzu sauce, and a sprinkling of black pepper. I don’t understand how I’ve gone decades without trying black pepper on my sashimi, but I would do so again within a week.

Seared beef nigiri

I ordered a few nigiri ($2-5 each), the most interesting involving a thin slice of blowtorched beef laid over the pat of rice ($7 for two). The unseasoned beef benefits more than most fish from a dip in soy sauce.

What I could not resist was ordering from the donburi menu, here made easy to understand as the “sushi bowl” menu. I can’t eat shrimp, so I avoided the house chirashi bowl (422), but the guy at the next table ordered one, and it looked so impressive he let me take a picture. The rice bowl is topped with several pieces of sashimi, plus scallops, sea urchin, salmon roe, and sweet shrimp, including an entire shrimp head, buggy eyes, swimmerets, and all.

The chirashi bowl, including a shrimp head with eyes and swimmerets

But I could and did order the compelling salmon and uni bowl, which in addition to seared salmon and sea urchin, featured a poached egg, salmon roe, and tobiko flying fish roe. If you’re fond of referring to the edible part of sea urchin as roe, you might call it eggs four ways. This too spares the seasoning, preferring to let all the seafood and chicken yolk do the work.

Some of these will be acquired tastes, and some of the fish won’t live up to that of your favorite sushi spots. However, there’s a sense of affordable indulgence that goes along with that, and a hominess I wouldn’t trade for anything.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Reunions, relocations, revisions, and more good news/bad news

Silent Comedy, Stick Figure, Dewey Defeats Truman, Avenue Army, Schizophonics
The salmon and uni rice bowl, with poached chicken egg and two types of roe
The salmon and uni rice bowl, with poached chicken egg and two types of roe

This place is familiar. I used to come here back when it was the Original Sab E Lee, the locally beloved Thai restaurant that moved to a larger space across the street years ago. There wasn’t much to the property back then, and there’s not much to look at as far as the storefront is concerned. Mostly a sign that reads Sushi Yorimichi. But it feels pretty perfect inside.

Place

Sushi Yorimichi

2405 Ulric St., San Diego

At least, it does to a guy who spent his teens going to hole-in-the-wall restaurants like this, as a military brat living in Japan. Most obvious are the shoji screens, paper lanterns, and no-frills dining furniture. The sushi bar that’s more of an arched window with, wrapped pieces of fish visible inside a glass cooler case. The case has been plastered with stickers of street racers, exactly the sort of cars my high school friends used to covet. Extra cred achieved if the car possessed Toyota’s near-mythical Hachi-Roku engine.

The long ago site of The Original Sab E Lee

Before I even picked up a menu, the place feels uncannily authentic, right down to the realistic plastic models of sushi nigiri, which sit on display beside a bonsai tree.

The menu smacks authentic, too, though I’ll soon realize there are a few interesting deviations. Not only sushi, but Japanese menu items across the board: yakitori skewers, ramen, chicken karaage, monkfish liver, tempura udon, and katsudon, a breaded pork cutlet served with egg over rice: the go-to order for high school me.

Interior reminiscent of many hole-in-the-wall Japanese eateries

My tastes have broadened since then, and I’ll soon be ordering entirely too much food. This menu might feel at home in an izakaya, the sort of bar and restaurant Japanese folk typically patronize after work. The beer and sake options reenforce the idea, and maybe so does the name. The word yorimichi technically translates to detour, but as they explain to me at the restaurant, it’s colloquially used to describe a sort of spontaneous hangout over food and drinks. My kind of detour.

Car stickers cover the sushi cooler, prompting memories of Japanese street racing culture

Fusion is most evident on the noodles menu. This includes classical ramen choices featuring tonkostu (pork bone) or shoyu (soy) based broth. Bu there’s a latent Mexican-styled favorite — birria ramen ($11.25) — and an udon adaptation of Italy’s famed ham and egg pasta, carbonara ($11.50).

Intriguing though these were, we steered away from noodle altogether, choosing to focus instead on meat, seafood, and (as it turned out) eggs.

Pork belly and skirt steak yakitori

Got started with yakitori meat skewers, keeping it simple with pork belly ($2.75) and skirt steak ($3.50). If this were strictly a yakitori restaurant, I’d still recommend it. With options including ribeye, chicken liver, bacon wrapped okra, scallops, and duck, there’s plenty to snack on all day. As an appetizer, the smart thing to do is pick any four skewers for $14.50.

Next came a spider hand roll (fried softshell crab), and a yellowtail sashimi dish dressed with serrano chilis, spicy ponzu sauce, and a sprinkling of black pepper. I don’t understand how I’ve gone decades without trying black pepper on my sashimi, but I would do so again within a week.

Seared beef nigiri

I ordered a few nigiri ($2-5 each), the most interesting involving a thin slice of blowtorched beef laid over the pat of rice ($7 for two). The unseasoned beef benefits more than most fish from a dip in soy sauce.

What I could not resist was ordering from the donburi menu, here made easy to understand as the “sushi bowl” menu. I can’t eat shrimp, so I avoided the house chirashi bowl (422), but the guy at the next table ordered one, and it looked so impressive he let me take a picture. The rice bowl is topped with several pieces of sashimi, plus scallops, sea urchin, salmon roe, and sweet shrimp, including an entire shrimp head, buggy eyes, swimmerets, and all.

The chirashi bowl, including a shrimp head with eyes and swimmerets

But I could and did order the compelling salmon and uni bowl, which in addition to seared salmon and sea urchin, featured a poached egg, salmon roe, and tobiko flying fish roe. If you’re fond of referring to the edible part of sea urchin as roe, you might call it eggs four ways. This too spares the seasoning, preferring to let all the seafood and chicken yolk do the work.

Some of these will be acquired tastes, and some of the fish won’t live up to that of your favorite sushi spots. However, there’s a sense of affordable indulgence that goes along with that, and a hominess I wouldn’t trade for anything.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Peter Sprague does Pat Metheney, who returns the favor

Occasional collaborations inspire new two-volume set
Next Article

A cow named India finds sanctuary at Campo’s Farm Animal Refuge

Creatures comforted
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close