4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

San Diego's weird pet rescues in 2022

Fire department extricates from wells, drains, fences, ditches, floodwaters.

"I told them, 'If Camo were a cat, they would definitely do it.'" - Image by Paige Martin
"I told them, 'If Camo were a cat, they would definitely do it.'"

On July 11, Camo, a five-year-old veiled chameleon, escaped from his indoor and outdoor cage in a Mission Hills home.

"I live next to a row of Juniper trees, so he will likely climb to the sunniest spot at the top of the trees," Paige Martin explained to her neighbors on social media. "He will be hard to spot in the greenery, but he turns bright green and yellow when he sleeps, so it will be easier to spot him at night. I'm asking you all to please keep an eye out for him."

Martin, a 28-year-old boat charter coordinator, put up fliers between Washington Street and University Avenue in her neighborhood and passed out photos of her 6-8 inch cone-headed chameleon within their 2-story apartment complex. One neighbor offered to fly a drone above, and another provided binoculars to help find Camo.

Then, later that Monday, Martin's neighbor upstairs yelled, "Paige, I see Camo!"

Martin ran upstairs to look out her neighbor's window, where she could see Camo hanging out on a branch from one of the Juniper trees.

"It's quite a way down from where he escaped," Martin recounted to me. "He is like my child."

Martin said she then ran to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department Station 8 on Goldfinch by Washington Street. "I rang their emergency bell and let them know what was going on. I told them, 'If Camo were a cat, they would definitely do it.' So they immediately followed me back to my apartment with their ladder."

Martin sent me photos of the rescue. In the images, a fireman wearing a navy blue t-shirt and orange gloves climbs a ladder up into the Juniper tree's branches and leaves, overhanging about 10 feet away from their apartment complex. Another fireman standing below holds the ladder still.

The backup plan to perform an equine hoist rescue using Copter 1 was implemented.

"And the amazing men at the SDFD saved him for me!" Martin concluded.

The San Diego Fire-Rescue Department responded to 67 animal rescues in the last couple of years, according to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Foundation. Other rescues involved birds and farm animals trapped in wells, drains, fences, and ditches or stranded in floodwaters. Animals have fallen down cliffs and hillsides and even been rescued from car engines and dashboards.

Then some cats get stuck in trees, like Camo the chameleon almost two weeks ago.

The non-profit's site adds that the fire department made seven horse rescues where five were ground lifted — and the other two rescued via a helicopter.

At about noon on June 24, Customs and Border Protection requested San Diego Fire-Rescue Department to the Lower Otay Reservoir to help rescue a CBD agent and his horse, General. The two were stung by a swarm of bees and needed medical attention. The Chula Vista Police Department assisted as well. Initially, the border patrol agent was extricated using SDFD's Copter 1 and transported to a local hospital.

Then a veterinarian had to check General's condition and possibly sedate him before extrication. General could kick and bite, as the loud noise from the helicopter and the wind downforce of the propellor might panic General and make him move abruptly. This is why sedation is an essential option in helicopter-horse rescues.

"[Initially] the SDFD technical rescue team tried to walk him out, but General was waiting for the helicopter option," reads the fire department's caption underneath the posted rescue photos. "So the backup plan to perform an equine hoist rescue using Copter 1 was implemented. The hoist took place at about 3 pm, and General was successfully taken to the landing zone. No injuries!."

The red-and-white-colored Copter 1 is a part of the Air Operations Division of the fire department; every year, the helicopters log between 400 and 500 hours of flight and respond to more than 400 emergencies.

In January, first responders and Sea World were called about a rogue sea lion roaming about in the middle lanes of Highway 94. Then the same sea lion was captured waddling in a Chollas Creek stormwater channel in April. The sea lion was nicknamed Freeway by his rescuers and is reportedly under the close watch of the Sea World staff.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Bondage, bitches, and Divine talk at Queen Bee’s in North Park

Dark Euphoria leads to dim melancholy
"I told them, 'If Camo were a cat, they would definitely do it.'" - Image by Paige Martin
"I told them, 'If Camo were a cat, they would definitely do it.'"

On July 11, Camo, a five-year-old veiled chameleon, escaped from his indoor and outdoor cage in a Mission Hills home.

"I live next to a row of Juniper trees, so he will likely climb to the sunniest spot at the top of the trees," Paige Martin explained to her neighbors on social media. "He will be hard to spot in the greenery, but he turns bright green and yellow when he sleeps, so it will be easier to spot him at night. I'm asking you all to please keep an eye out for him."

Martin, a 28-year-old boat charter coordinator, put up fliers between Washington Street and University Avenue in her neighborhood and passed out photos of her 6-8 inch cone-headed chameleon within their 2-story apartment complex. One neighbor offered to fly a drone above, and another provided binoculars to help find Camo.

Then, later that Monday, Martin's neighbor upstairs yelled, "Paige, I see Camo!"

Martin ran upstairs to look out her neighbor's window, where she could see Camo hanging out on a branch from one of the Juniper trees.

"It's quite a way down from where he escaped," Martin recounted to me. "He is like my child."

Martin said she then ran to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department Station 8 on Goldfinch by Washington Street. "I rang their emergency bell and let them know what was going on. I told them, 'If Camo were a cat, they would definitely do it.' So they immediately followed me back to my apartment with their ladder."

Martin sent me photos of the rescue. In the images, a fireman wearing a navy blue t-shirt and orange gloves climbs a ladder up into the Juniper tree's branches and leaves, overhanging about 10 feet away from their apartment complex. Another fireman standing below holds the ladder still.

The backup plan to perform an equine hoist rescue using Copter 1 was implemented.

"And the amazing men at the SDFD saved him for me!" Martin concluded.

The San Diego Fire-Rescue Department responded to 67 animal rescues in the last couple of years, according to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Foundation. Other rescues involved birds and farm animals trapped in wells, drains, fences, and ditches or stranded in floodwaters. Animals have fallen down cliffs and hillsides and even been rescued from car engines and dashboards.

Then some cats get stuck in trees, like Camo the chameleon almost two weeks ago.

The non-profit's site adds that the fire department made seven horse rescues where five were ground lifted — and the other two rescued via a helicopter.

At about noon on June 24, Customs and Border Protection requested San Diego Fire-Rescue Department to the Lower Otay Reservoir to help rescue a CBD agent and his horse, General. The two were stung by a swarm of bees and needed medical attention. The Chula Vista Police Department assisted as well. Initially, the border patrol agent was extricated using SDFD's Copter 1 and transported to a local hospital.

Then a veterinarian had to check General's condition and possibly sedate him before extrication. General could kick and bite, as the loud noise from the helicopter and the wind downforce of the propellor might panic General and make him move abruptly. This is why sedation is an essential option in helicopter-horse rescues.

"[Initially] the SDFD technical rescue team tried to walk him out, but General was waiting for the helicopter option," reads the fire department's caption underneath the posted rescue photos. "So the backup plan to perform an equine hoist rescue using Copter 1 was implemented. The hoist took place at about 3 pm, and General was successfully taken to the landing zone. No injuries!."

The red-and-white-colored Copter 1 is a part of the Air Operations Division of the fire department; every year, the helicopters log between 400 and 500 hours of flight and respond to more than 400 emergencies.

In January, first responders and Sea World were called about a rogue sea lion roaming about in the middle lanes of Highway 94. Then the same sea lion was captured waddling in a Chollas Creek stormwater channel in April. The sea lion was nicknamed Freeway by his rescuers and is reportedly under the close watch of the Sea World staff.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Where the El Cajon Typewriter Co. sign leads

Hanging on the outside of the building, is a large rectangular sign: Smith Corona Factory Outlet.
Next Article

Bertran de Born: a Provencal troubadour who composed both love and political songs

The Lord of Oc and No
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close