4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Mission Bay golf course to replace clubhouse, get better irrigation and power

Audubon and Sierra clubs say it's a waste given re-wild plans

DeAnza plan – current uses
DeAnza plan – current uses

San Diego is planning a huge investment to restore wetlands in De Anza Cove, work that may occur right over the Mission Bay golf course.

So why is the city spending money on electrical and irrigation upgrades to the course when its acreage may change?

The restoration work being planned is part of the 166-acre De Anza revitalization plan, for which a few alternatives are proposed - and environmentalists are worried the popular golf course won't be as temporary as they had hoped.

Currently, the course, one of five operated by the city's golf division, is one of the biggest land uses in the northeastern corner of the park, and critics say it's a relic. A water hog, taking up land that could be used for wildlife, carbon capture and meeting the challenge of sea rise.

In a unanimous vote last week, the active transportation committee approved a budget revision that funds the $1,040,000 improvements from the golf enterprise fund, as well as $285,084 to demolish the clubhouse and construct two portable buildings for golf operations and food service.

The irrigation and electrical upgrades are scheduled to start on February 7, 2022, last 16 months, and cost a total of $5,500,000.

Golfers have lobbied to keep the 18-hole, 2700-yard public golf course intact, which now takes up about a quarter of the planning area. Under one alternative, it would be reduced by 30 percent.

But the future of the whole area is still being decided.

"The committee would save the public a lot of money by not investing in the current land uses until the long-term land use plan is approved," said Andrew Meyer, conservation director at the San Diego Audubon Society and campaign director for ReWild Mission Bay.

While the De Anza project is being led by the city, the ReWild project is conducted by the San Diego Audubon Society to restore wetlands along Pacific Beach Drive and both sides of Rose Creek.

The city's plans for De Anza Cove, which is part of the 4,039-acre Mission Bay regional park, aim for a mix of public recreation, camping, wetlands, and other active park uses that will bring in revenue from leaseholds.

According to the Golf Committee, in fiscal year 2020, the course contributed rent payments of $295,000 to the General Fund, an amount that would be reduced in proportion to a reduction of its acreage.

Meyer says the parkland has greater value as natural habitat for flood protection, to sustain the area's threatened and endangered species, and to improve access for all San Diegans.

Sierra Club San Diego has criticized the funding of the golf course, saying the use of potable water for turf is reason enough to halt the sizable expenditures.

Andy Field, director of parks and recreation, said they recognize that one of the alternatives may well call for wetlands to be placed on top of the golf course, or offer other recreational experiences in its place.

The planning department intends to come back at some point in 2022 with a public process to identify the best future for the area, he said.

"But before that happens, we want to be sure the golf course that is occupying the space currently is in its utmost and best condition."

The improvements "will eventually pay for themselves, as they're going to be saving electricity and water over the years ahead."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

The Camp Pendleton Marines who formed the “friendly invasion” in Paekakariki, New Zealand

“We were seen as a very good staging post for the Americans to launch the Pacific war, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.”
Next Article

Gonzo Report: Secret show in the Cajon Zone

If you don’t know, you’re not invited
DeAnza plan – current uses
DeAnza plan – current uses

San Diego is planning a huge investment to restore wetlands in De Anza Cove, work that may occur right over the Mission Bay golf course.

So why is the city spending money on electrical and irrigation upgrades to the course when its acreage may change?

The restoration work being planned is part of the 166-acre De Anza revitalization plan, for which a few alternatives are proposed - and environmentalists are worried the popular golf course won't be as temporary as they had hoped.

Currently, the course, one of five operated by the city's golf division, is one of the biggest land uses in the northeastern corner of the park, and critics say it's a relic. A water hog, taking up land that could be used for wildlife, carbon capture and meeting the challenge of sea rise.

In a unanimous vote last week, the active transportation committee approved a budget revision that funds the $1,040,000 improvements from the golf enterprise fund, as well as $285,084 to demolish the clubhouse and construct two portable buildings for golf operations and food service.

The irrigation and electrical upgrades are scheduled to start on February 7, 2022, last 16 months, and cost a total of $5,500,000.

Golfers have lobbied to keep the 18-hole, 2700-yard public golf course intact, which now takes up about a quarter of the planning area. Under one alternative, it would be reduced by 30 percent.

But the future of the whole area is still being decided.

"The committee would save the public a lot of money by not investing in the current land uses until the long-term land use plan is approved," said Andrew Meyer, conservation director at the San Diego Audubon Society and campaign director for ReWild Mission Bay.

While the De Anza project is being led by the city, the ReWild project is conducted by the San Diego Audubon Society to restore wetlands along Pacific Beach Drive and both sides of Rose Creek.

The city's plans for De Anza Cove, which is part of the 4,039-acre Mission Bay regional park, aim for a mix of public recreation, camping, wetlands, and other active park uses that will bring in revenue from leaseholds.

According to the Golf Committee, in fiscal year 2020, the course contributed rent payments of $295,000 to the General Fund, an amount that would be reduced in proportion to a reduction of its acreage.

Meyer says the parkland has greater value as natural habitat for flood protection, to sustain the area's threatened and endangered species, and to improve access for all San Diegans.

Sierra Club San Diego has criticized the funding of the golf course, saying the use of potable water for turf is reason enough to halt the sizable expenditures.

Andy Field, director of parks and recreation, said they recognize that one of the alternatives may well call for wetlands to be placed on top of the golf course, or offer other recreational experiences in its place.

The planning department intends to come back at some point in 2022 with a public process to identify the best future for the area, he said.

"But before that happens, we want to be sure the golf course that is occupying the space currently is in its utmost and best condition."

The improvements "will eventually pay for themselves, as they're going to be saving electricity and water over the years ahead."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Tour La Jolla’s “Villa Paradiso” mansion

Now double its size
Next Article

Peter Navarro spills many beans re San Diego politics

Democrat publisher and Congressman Clint McKinnon, gadfly Mike Aguirre, Pete Wilson as mayor, Maureen O'Connor goes homeless in Balboa Park, Bruce Henderson on the Chargers
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close