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A recording studio right next to dad’s bedroom

Tape Deck Mountain, Jonathan Karrant, Tennessee Kamanski, The Forty Nineteens, Biggie Babylon

Tape Deck Mountain
Tape Deck Mountain

Fronted by singer-guitarist Travis Trevisan, Tape Deck Mountain began by releasing all their recordings on cassette tapes. Inspired to become a musician after seeing the Smashing Pumpkins, Trevisan’s first band Liberty Park had to change their name when Linkin Park made it big. After releasing their debut EP Sparks, produced by Keith Milgaten (Jamuel Saxon), Tape Deck Mountain went to Austin Texas to play SXSW in 2010 and 2011, inspiring Trevisan to relocate to Austin. He kept the band name active with new members, recording with them after returning to San Diego in summer 2012. The next Tape Deck Mountain album Sway featured ten songs mostly written during his year-long stay in Austin, finalized at American Sound Studios in San Diego and released by Trevisan’s own label, Nineteen98. Their third album, 2018’s Echo Chamber Blues, featured Trevisan backed by drummer Andy Gregg (recruited via CraigsList) and Nashville bassist Sully Kincaid, along with guest guitarist Greg Harp. Tape Deck Mountain just dropped their fourth full-length, True Deceiver, the first time Trevisan has been backed by the same players on two consecutive albums. A limited transparent green vinyl edition is also available.

Jonathan Karrant

Crooner Jonathan Karrant specializes in the sounds of the American Songbook. His full-length On and On hit number four on the Billboard Jazz charts and his album Live reached number two on the iTunes Jazz Charts. Among his awards are the New York City Jazz Cabaret Honors, “Best Singer” for the Bravo California Awards, and he was named one of the top 12 rising jazz vocalists by Downbeat Magazine. His new album Shadows Fall, due May 21, is a collaboration with local jazz pianist Joshua White, who was praised by Herbie Hancock as having “immense talent” and lauded for his “daring and courageous approach to improvisation...on the cutting edge of innovation.” The 13-track album covers classic standards such as “Lush Life,” “So in Love,” and “I Thought About You,” as well as contemporary non-jazz numbers like “Simply the Best,” “I Try,” and “Your Smiling Face.” Karrant and White will play a release concert at Queen Bee’s in North Park on June 19, performing songs from the album followed by a meet and greet, with dinner and drinks available.

Jonathan Karrant & Joshua White

Tennessee Kamanski

Bee Constant, aka Tennessee Kamanski, was only 16 when she began creating demos in the home studio operated by her father Paul Kamanski, probably best known for writing hits for the Beat Farmers, a San Diego cow-punk band with a worldwide rep. He also had his own band, as well as playing in various groups with Joey Harris, including the Electric Sons and the Fingers with Billy Thompson. “Seeing as the recording studio is right next to my dad’s bedroom,” she says, “I’d have to sneak in there and record. And then he’d hear me and say he had an idea, and then I’d have to figure out a way to politely tell him to back off, that it was my record. We got into tons of fights.” Her six-song debut Slept in My Windbreaker featured all originals and her own playing on all instruments, other than brief guest turns from Aaron Dennis and Larry Dent. Her father also (unknown to her at first) recorded some bass runs on one track, which she says she liked well enough to keep. Kamanski‘s new band with fellow native San Diegan Sarah De La Isla, Allen LeRoy Hug, just released two new singles, “Steady” and “Saturnine Boy.”

The Forty Nineteens

The classic radio rock fans who founded the Forty Nineteens include two members of ‘90s cult faves Mary’s Danish, Matt Colleran (guitar) and Nick Zeigler (drums), alongside singer John Pozza (from L.A. garage rockers The Leonards) and guitarist Chuck Gorian. Pozza and Gorian have both worked as criminal defense attorneys in San Diego, hence the band name being code for “time off for good behavior.” Their debut album No Expiration Date was released in 2012. They earned regular spins on Little Steven’s Underground Garage on Sirius XM, are a favorite band of Drew Carey, and they’ve performed at Yankee Stadium and national music festivals with Gin Blossoms, Robin Zander, the Alarm, the Fixx, Billy Bob Thornton, and others. They just released their fifth album, New Roaring 20s, featuring guest player and ex-Standell Tony Valentino, best known for the vintage hit single “Dirty Water.”

Biggie Babylon

Chaldean rapper Alvin Shamoun - aka Biggie Babylon - is a hip-hop artist formerly known as Entre-P. Born in San Diego to a pair of Chaldean Iraqi immigrants, his family opened Mike’s Market liquor store in a low-income neighborhood of Southeast San Diego in 1972. After graduating from Valhalla High School, he ran his own check cashing and cellular phone store across the street from Mike’s Market. Having also run a 420 dispensary, he later began making music and built his own recording studio. He changed his name to Biggie Babylon in 2014 and inked a deal with Universal Music Group, collaborating with Josh Franks on tracks like “Monopoly.” His 2018 DJ LoudPack came in a tuna can-sized metal package containing music on a flash drive as well as a gram of cannabis, two rolled joints, a THC edible, and a branded wristband. Babylon’s upcoming single “All In” (due June 19) was produced by Thom Genius and recorded during the pandemic shutdown in Genius’ garage. The song is planned for Babylon’s album Coronado California, which again features the production talents of Josh Franks, as well as Mev the Renegade and Dabato. A video for “All In” shot in early February by Damien Sandoval is streaming online.

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Tape Deck Mountain
Tape Deck Mountain

Fronted by singer-guitarist Travis Trevisan, Tape Deck Mountain began by releasing all their recordings on cassette tapes. Inspired to become a musician after seeing the Smashing Pumpkins, Trevisan’s first band Liberty Park had to change their name when Linkin Park made it big. After releasing their debut EP Sparks, produced by Keith Milgaten (Jamuel Saxon), Tape Deck Mountain went to Austin Texas to play SXSW in 2010 and 2011, inspiring Trevisan to relocate to Austin. He kept the band name active with new members, recording with them after returning to San Diego in summer 2012. The next Tape Deck Mountain album Sway featured ten songs mostly written during his year-long stay in Austin, finalized at American Sound Studios in San Diego and released by Trevisan’s own label, Nineteen98. Their third album, 2018’s Echo Chamber Blues, featured Trevisan backed by drummer Andy Gregg (recruited via CraigsList) and Nashville bassist Sully Kincaid, along with guest guitarist Greg Harp. Tape Deck Mountain just dropped their fourth full-length, True Deceiver, the first time Trevisan has been backed by the same players on two consecutive albums. A limited transparent green vinyl edition is also available.

Jonathan Karrant

Crooner Jonathan Karrant specializes in the sounds of the American Songbook. His full-length On and On hit number four on the Billboard Jazz charts and his album Live reached number two on the iTunes Jazz Charts. Among his awards are the New York City Jazz Cabaret Honors, “Best Singer” for the Bravo California Awards, and he was named one of the top 12 rising jazz vocalists by Downbeat Magazine. His new album Shadows Fall, due May 21, is a collaboration with local jazz pianist Joshua White, who was praised by Herbie Hancock as having “immense talent” and lauded for his “daring and courageous approach to improvisation...on the cutting edge of innovation.” The 13-track album covers classic standards such as “Lush Life,” “So in Love,” and “I Thought About You,” as well as contemporary non-jazz numbers like “Simply the Best,” “I Try,” and “Your Smiling Face.” Karrant and White will play a release concert at Queen Bee’s in North Park on June 19, performing songs from the album followed by a meet and greet, with dinner and drinks available.

Jonathan Karrant & Joshua White

Tennessee Kamanski

Bee Constant, aka Tennessee Kamanski, was only 16 when she began creating demos in the home studio operated by her father Paul Kamanski, probably best known for writing hits for the Beat Farmers, a San Diego cow-punk band with a worldwide rep. He also had his own band, as well as playing in various groups with Joey Harris, including the Electric Sons and the Fingers with Billy Thompson. “Seeing as the recording studio is right next to my dad’s bedroom,” she says, “I’d have to sneak in there and record. And then he’d hear me and say he had an idea, and then I’d have to figure out a way to politely tell him to back off, that it was my record. We got into tons of fights.” Her six-song debut Slept in My Windbreaker featured all originals and her own playing on all instruments, other than brief guest turns from Aaron Dennis and Larry Dent. Her father also (unknown to her at first) recorded some bass runs on one track, which she says she liked well enough to keep. Kamanski‘s new band with fellow native San Diegan Sarah De La Isla, Allen LeRoy Hug, just released two new singles, “Steady” and “Saturnine Boy.”

The Forty Nineteens

The classic radio rock fans who founded the Forty Nineteens include two members of ‘90s cult faves Mary’s Danish, Matt Colleran (guitar) and Nick Zeigler (drums), alongside singer John Pozza (from L.A. garage rockers The Leonards) and guitarist Chuck Gorian. Pozza and Gorian have both worked as criminal defense attorneys in San Diego, hence the band name being code for “time off for good behavior.” Their debut album No Expiration Date was released in 2012. They earned regular spins on Little Steven’s Underground Garage on Sirius XM, are a favorite band of Drew Carey, and they’ve performed at Yankee Stadium and national music festivals with Gin Blossoms, Robin Zander, the Alarm, the Fixx, Billy Bob Thornton, and others. They just released their fifth album, New Roaring 20s, featuring guest player and ex-Standell Tony Valentino, best known for the vintage hit single “Dirty Water.”

Biggie Babylon

Chaldean rapper Alvin Shamoun - aka Biggie Babylon - is a hip-hop artist formerly known as Entre-P. Born in San Diego to a pair of Chaldean Iraqi immigrants, his family opened Mike’s Market liquor store in a low-income neighborhood of Southeast San Diego in 1972. After graduating from Valhalla High School, he ran his own check cashing and cellular phone store across the street from Mike’s Market. Having also run a 420 dispensary, he later began making music and built his own recording studio. He changed his name to Biggie Babylon in 2014 and inked a deal with Universal Music Group, collaborating with Josh Franks on tracks like “Monopoly.” His 2018 DJ LoudPack came in a tuna can-sized metal package containing music on a flash drive as well as a gram of cannabis, two rolled joints, a THC edible, and a branded wristband. Babylon’s upcoming single “All In” (due June 19) was produced by Thom Genius and recorded during the pandemic shutdown in Genius’ garage. The song is planned for Babylon’s album Coronado California, which again features the production talents of Josh Franks, as well as Mev the Renegade and Dabato. A video for “All In” shot in early February by Damien Sandoval is streaming online.

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