4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Mira Mesa imagines walking to work

Emphasis on Sorrento Mesa and Miramar

Skyway map
Skyway map

Unlike neighborhoods where new housing is seen as a scourge, residents of Mira Mesa are welcoming density. And the possibility of actually walking to work.

Surveys for the community plan update found that slightly more residents support the approach. So planners will now begin to focus on the most housing intense options for the update, which was the topic of a workshop last week.

For each of three land-use scenarios, locals clamored for ways to get around without a car. One goal is to create "15 minute neighborhoods," the time it takes to walk to work or a shopping center. Commuting by aerial skyway is even part of the proposal.

"San Diego has such a big housing shortage," said resident Sonali Kumar, who has struggled with the lack of options. "I support scenario three because it's the more housing dense one, creating more housing near employment centers."

Mira Mesa, located in north central San Diego, has far more jobs than homes or sidewalks. And that has led to an unsurprising disconnect.

In 2018, over 80,000 people commuted into Mira Mesa, while over 32,000 residents commuted out. Only about 7,900 people both live and work in Mira Mesa.

A typical household in Mira Mesa spends over $10,000 annually in transportation costs.

So, planners are looking to intensify residential and employment land uses within transit priority areas.

Scenario three would provide the greatest boost to the number of residents and workers within a 15-minute walk to an "activity hub." It would also boost potential new housing in transit priority areas, nearly twice that of the least intensive option. Not everyone likes the idea.

"Many of my neighbors are concerned about the possibility of increased congestion" due to upzoning, said Aaron Barral. But greater density is actually the solution to the traffic problems, he added.

"When you provide enough housing choices close to where people work and shop, driving becomes optional."

Planners centered on the two main employment centers where 85 percent of jobs are clustered: Sorrento Mesa, which is mostly industrial parks, and Miramar, with its light industrial uses such as warehouses and breweries.

According to senior planner, Alex Frost, after survey results were in, SANDAG proposed a higher density for Sorrento Mesa to reflect their latest ideas for high speed commuter rail.

Other focus areas are Mira Mesa Gateway off I-15, where residents preferred a business park designation, and Mira Mesa Town Center, where the preference was for community village (54 dwelling units per acre) and urban village (73 dwelling units per acre) designations.

"Most of the results were for change" instead of keeping the existing land use, Frost said of the survey. People wanted higher density and more mixed use village settings for a lot of the shopping centers and employment areas.

"I think a lot of the younger participants wanted to see more change."

But Craig Jackson, a member of the Mira Mesa Community Planning Group, spoke for change - for seniors. "Transportation along the corridor that is Sorrento Valley Blvd. and Calle Cristobal, a collection of single-family homes, has been mostly ignored," he said.

"Transportation from this area to the hubs will be important, particularly for seniors."

Two large projects in Carroll Canyon had the support of the planning group, in part for adding a lot of new parkland: 3 Roots, an 1,800-unit project with 10 percent of units deed restricted for low income; and Stonecreek, with 4,450 units.

In contrast, Frost said, the community plan update proposes to add 12,023 housing units with no new parkland.

Will there be any incentives for building housing, asked commissioner Doug Austin?

"There are folks out there trying to get some of the larger corporations to help subsidize middle-income housing." So if Qualcomm or anyone wants to build housing, are there incentives or benefits that would allow more density?

Frost said they have been in "long discussion" with Qualcomm and other large employers, like Alexander Real Estate and other life science developers, but all they can provide in the update is the zoning shift.

"I think the biggest incentive is to first allow for some kind of residential mixed-use within this employment setting."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Sheet music as tool of colonialism

Oxford itself is a product of Western Civilization
Next Article

Old Joe and the Border Boys

Now playing in wide release!
Skyway map
Skyway map

Unlike neighborhoods where new housing is seen as a scourge, residents of Mira Mesa are welcoming density. And the possibility of actually walking to work.

Surveys for the community plan update found that slightly more residents support the approach. So planners will now begin to focus on the most housing intense options for the update, which was the topic of a workshop last week.

For each of three land-use scenarios, locals clamored for ways to get around without a car. One goal is to create "15 minute neighborhoods," the time it takes to walk to work or a shopping center. Commuting by aerial skyway is even part of the proposal.

"San Diego has such a big housing shortage," said resident Sonali Kumar, who has struggled with the lack of options. "I support scenario three because it's the more housing dense one, creating more housing near employment centers."

Mira Mesa, located in north central San Diego, has far more jobs than homes or sidewalks. And that has led to an unsurprising disconnect.

In 2018, over 80,000 people commuted into Mira Mesa, while over 32,000 residents commuted out. Only about 7,900 people both live and work in Mira Mesa.

A typical household in Mira Mesa spends over $10,000 annually in transportation costs.

So, planners are looking to intensify residential and employment land uses within transit priority areas.

Scenario three would provide the greatest boost to the number of residents and workers within a 15-minute walk to an "activity hub." It would also boost potential new housing in transit priority areas, nearly twice that of the least intensive option. Not everyone likes the idea.

"Many of my neighbors are concerned about the possibility of increased congestion" due to upzoning, said Aaron Barral. But greater density is actually the solution to the traffic problems, he added.

"When you provide enough housing choices close to where people work and shop, driving becomes optional."

Planners centered on the two main employment centers where 85 percent of jobs are clustered: Sorrento Mesa, which is mostly industrial parks, and Miramar, with its light industrial uses such as warehouses and breweries.

According to senior planner, Alex Frost, after survey results were in, SANDAG proposed a higher density for Sorrento Mesa to reflect their latest ideas for high speed commuter rail.

Other focus areas are Mira Mesa Gateway off I-15, where residents preferred a business park designation, and Mira Mesa Town Center, where the preference was for community village (54 dwelling units per acre) and urban village (73 dwelling units per acre) designations.

"Most of the results were for change" instead of keeping the existing land use, Frost said of the survey. People wanted higher density and more mixed use village settings for a lot of the shopping centers and employment areas.

"I think a lot of the younger participants wanted to see more change."

But Craig Jackson, a member of the Mira Mesa Community Planning Group, spoke for change - for seniors. "Transportation along the corridor that is Sorrento Valley Blvd. and Calle Cristobal, a collection of single-family homes, has been mostly ignored," he said.

"Transportation from this area to the hubs will be important, particularly for seniors."

Two large projects in Carroll Canyon had the support of the planning group, in part for adding a lot of new parkland: 3 Roots, an 1,800-unit project with 10 percent of units deed restricted for low income; and Stonecreek, with 4,450 units.

In contrast, Frost said, the community plan update proposes to add 12,023 housing units with no new parkland.

Will there be any incentives for building housing, asked commissioner Doug Austin?

"There are folks out there trying to get some of the larger corporations to help subsidize middle-income housing." So if Qualcomm or anyone wants to build housing, are there incentives or benefits that would allow more density?

Frost said they have been in "long discussion" with Qualcomm and other large employers, like Alexander Real Estate and other life science developers, but all they can provide in the update is the zoning shift.

"I think the biggest incentive is to first allow for some kind of residential mixed-use within this employment setting."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Tatis Jr. suffers “Jacob’s joint” injury as punishment for his anointing as Padres’ savior

Touched By An Angel
Next Article

One Season Brewing debuts within TRVLR Coffee

There’s kombucha, electric skateboards, and bicycles for sale too
Comments
2

In reality very few people can actually walk to work. Most employment in walkable distance from ones home is not the kind of employment that pays high wages. The kinds of jobs that pay above a living wage are located in areas where housing is not a walkable distance away. I think many people would like to walk, bike or take mass transit to work but San Diego and outlying cities were not designed for that. Mass transit takes a long time and few can actually walk to work from the trolley/bus stop. Envisioning is one thing reality is another.

April 2, 2021

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close