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Lobbyists clamor to feed police chief Nisleit

Barona Indians, DaVita kidney firm pile up money for Shirley Weber

SDPD Chief Nisleit’s $8.3 million meal

As the coronavirus pandemic raged on last fall, shutting down a multitude of conventions across the globe, an annual gathering of the nation’s top cops was a notable exception. “Upon concluding it was imperative to convene an in-person meeting to discuss the various challenges of 2020, the Major Cities Chiefs Association held its annual fall meeting in New Orleans,” per the group’s October 30 news release. “While discussing lessons learned and best practices, the membership expressed concern regarding efforts by local elected officials to restrict the use of less than lethal tools. Allegations that law enforcement agencies overuse less than lethal tools are simply unfounded.” The statement added, “Given that many [Major Cities Chiefs Association] members expect activity in their jurisdictions surrounding the November 3rd election, it’s imperative that law enforcement maintain access to tools and resources necessary to quell violence and protect life and property.”

SDPD Chief David Nisleit flashes a less than lethal smile.

The event also served as a chance for sellers of “less than lethal” devices to demonstrate their wares. As they pitched their wares, the vendors picked up food and beverage tabs for law enforcement higher-ups. On October 15, Niche Technology of Springfield, Missouri, treated San Diego police chief David Nisleit to a $100 meal. The next night, Utility Inc. of Decatur, George paid a $100 dinner tab for the chief. On October 17, Axon Enterprise of Scottsdale, Arizona, spent $75 for Nisleit’s evening meal, all according to the chief’s annual financial interest statement for 2020, filed March 9. Axon makes Tasers, the controversial stun-guns that have steadily grown in use by law enforcement. The company also produces the so-called body-worn cameras used by San Diego cops. A contract between Axon and the city of San Diego, dated June 23 of last year, says the firm is getting paid $8,367,892 for goods and services related to the devices. “The purpose of this contract is to outfit current employees as well as recruits graduating from the Academy (expected 200 recruits per year),” says the document. Utility, Inc makes body-mounted video gear, and Niche Technology specializes in police video records tracking.

Cash for kidneys

Lorena Gonzalez covets the secretary of state job to which fellow assembly democrat Shirley Weber was appointed.

California Secretary of State Shirley Weber continues to pile up significant campaign money for her attempt to hold her seat against next year’s election challenge by Assembly Democrat Lorena Gonzalez. On March 3, Lakeside’s Barona Band of Mission Indians gave $5000, as did DaVita Total Renal Care of Tacoma, Washington. That firm has also supported charitable causes favored by Weber. “Dialysis company DaVita gave nearly $250,000 combined to the Black, Latino and Women’s Caucus foundations between 2017 and 2019, as it fought a union-backed ballot measure, and then a bill, that would curb profits at dialysis clinics,” reported CalMatters a year ago in February. “As long as a person wants to help and contribute to scholarships and our leadership program to build the potential of young people,” Weber was quoted as saying, “there’s never been an effort not to accept contributions from those individuals.”Other special interests contributing to Weber’s current campaign fund include the California Real Estate Political Action Committee, with $16,200 on March 4. Meanwhile, Gonzalez’s so-called ballot measure committee got $25,000 from the San Ramon-based Sheet Metal Workers International Association Local 104 PAC on February 16.

Politically dead

Former San Diego County Supervisor Diane Jacob, termed-out of office last year, has given the $163,056 of left-over cash in her 2016 re-election campaign fund to the Miramar National Cemetery Support Foundation, according to a March 3 campaign disclosure filing. Per its online mission statement, the foundation advises “on specific memorial projects, raising funds to construct those projects, administering memorial trust funds, and sponsoring commemorative ceremonies to mark significant patriotic events throughout the year.” Activities include those on Veterans Day, Memorial Day, and the Avenue of Flags. Fundraising for a new outdoor arena to accommodate family visitors has begun. Records show that Jacob’s late husband Paul Ernest Jacob, an ex-Navy officer who died September 23, 2018 at 80, is interred there... County cycling enthusiasts have cause for concern based on a new audit report to the TransNet Independent Taxpayer Oversight Committee. According to the March 3 document, the Bike Early Action Program “will likely not be completed within a 10-year timeframe as expected because of project delays, especially with permitting. While the 2019 Plan of Finance showed sufficient funding to complete the Bike Early Action Program, the Bike non-Early Action Program projects remaining in the Regional Bikeway Program are at greater risk of not being completed on schedule or as planned.” Explaining why was difficult, say auditors. “When we reviewed the six completed projects as of July 7, 2020 in more depth, we did not find a common factor causing delays — although most experienced some type of delay. For example, the Sweetwater Bonita segment had an 8-month delayed start in the advertisement phase which led to compounded delays in all following stages. Another project, the Coastal Rail Trail in Oceanside, had delays in the construction phase. Yet, there was no clear indication of patterns behind the various project delays.”

— Matt Potter

(@sdmattpotter)

The Reader offers $25 for news tips published in this column. Call our voice mail at 619-235-3000, ext. 440, or sandiegoreader.com/staff/matt-potter/contact/.

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SDPD Chief Nisleit’s $8.3 million meal

As the coronavirus pandemic raged on last fall, shutting down a multitude of conventions across the globe, an annual gathering of the nation’s top cops was a notable exception. “Upon concluding it was imperative to convene an in-person meeting to discuss the various challenges of 2020, the Major Cities Chiefs Association held its annual fall meeting in New Orleans,” per the group’s October 30 news release. “While discussing lessons learned and best practices, the membership expressed concern regarding efforts by local elected officials to restrict the use of less than lethal tools. Allegations that law enforcement agencies overuse less than lethal tools are simply unfounded.” The statement added, “Given that many [Major Cities Chiefs Association] members expect activity in their jurisdictions surrounding the November 3rd election, it’s imperative that law enforcement maintain access to tools and resources necessary to quell violence and protect life and property.”

SDPD Chief David Nisleit flashes a less than lethal smile.

The event also served as a chance for sellers of “less than lethal” devices to demonstrate their wares. As they pitched their wares, the vendors picked up food and beverage tabs for law enforcement higher-ups. On October 15, Niche Technology of Springfield, Missouri, treated San Diego police chief David Nisleit to a $100 meal. The next night, Utility Inc. of Decatur, George paid a $100 dinner tab for the chief. On October 17, Axon Enterprise of Scottsdale, Arizona, spent $75 for Nisleit’s evening meal, all according to the chief’s annual financial interest statement for 2020, filed March 9. Axon makes Tasers, the controversial stun-guns that have steadily grown in use by law enforcement. The company also produces the so-called body-worn cameras used by San Diego cops. A contract between Axon and the city of San Diego, dated June 23 of last year, says the firm is getting paid $8,367,892 for goods and services related to the devices. “The purpose of this contract is to outfit current employees as well as recruits graduating from the Academy (expected 200 recruits per year),” says the document. Utility, Inc makes body-mounted video gear, and Niche Technology specializes in police video records tracking.

Cash for kidneys

Lorena Gonzalez covets the secretary of state job to which fellow assembly democrat Shirley Weber was appointed.

California Secretary of State Shirley Weber continues to pile up significant campaign money for her attempt to hold her seat against next year’s election challenge by Assembly Democrat Lorena Gonzalez. On March 3, Lakeside’s Barona Band of Mission Indians gave $5000, as did DaVita Total Renal Care of Tacoma, Washington. That firm has also supported charitable causes favored by Weber. “Dialysis company DaVita gave nearly $250,000 combined to the Black, Latino and Women’s Caucus foundations between 2017 and 2019, as it fought a union-backed ballot measure, and then a bill, that would curb profits at dialysis clinics,” reported CalMatters a year ago in February. “As long as a person wants to help and contribute to scholarships and our leadership program to build the potential of young people,” Weber was quoted as saying, “there’s never been an effort not to accept contributions from those individuals.”Other special interests contributing to Weber’s current campaign fund include the California Real Estate Political Action Committee, with $16,200 on March 4. Meanwhile, Gonzalez’s so-called ballot measure committee got $25,000 from the San Ramon-based Sheet Metal Workers International Association Local 104 PAC on February 16.

Politically dead

Former San Diego County Supervisor Diane Jacob, termed-out of office last year, has given the $163,056 of left-over cash in her 2016 re-election campaign fund to the Miramar National Cemetery Support Foundation, according to a March 3 campaign disclosure filing. Per its online mission statement, the foundation advises “on specific memorial projects, raising funds to construct those projects, administering memorial trust funds, and sponsoring commemorative ceremonies to mark significant patriotic events throughout the year.” Activities include those on Veterans Day, Memorial Day, and the Avenue of Flags. Fundraising for a new outdoor arena to accommodate family visitors has begun. Records show that Jacob’s late husband Paul Ernest Jacob, an ex-Navy officer who died September 23, 2018 at 80, is interred there... County cycling enthusiasts have cause for concern based on a new audit report to the TransNet Independent Taxpayer Oversight Committee. According to the March 3 document, the Bike Early Action Program “will likely not be completed within a 10-year timeframe as expected because of project delays, especially with permitting. While the 2019 Plan of Finance showed sufficient funding to complete the Bike Early Action Program, the Bike non-Early Action Program projects remaining in the Regional Bikeway Program are at greater risk of not being completed on schedule or as planned.” Explaining why was difficult, say auditors. “When we reviewed the six completed projects as of July 7, 2020 in more depth, we did not find a common factor causing delays — although most experienced some type of delay. For example, the Sweetwater Bonita segment had an 8-month delayed start in the advertisement phase which led to compounded delays in all following stages. Another project, the Coastal Rail Trail in Oceanside, had delays in the construction phase. Yet, there was no clear indication of patterns behind the various project delays.”

— Matt Potter

(@sdmattpotter)

The Reader offers $25 for news tips published in this column. Call our voice mail at 619-235-3000, ext. 440, or sandiegoreader.com/staff/matt-potter/contact/.

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Comments
1

(In my response to the context from Matt):
County cycling enthusiasts have cause for concern based of a new audit --- The examples shown, such as those, were some pasttime examples that the San Diego County Bicycling Coalition., would claim to have interest of concern to. But those were the times when SDCBC was claiming to be an advocate within cycling. I have now looked on their website, for an updat,, as SDCBC does not show of them being a (claimed to be) advocate anymore. But when INDIVDUAL cyclists having concern of real advocacy attention needed, that be when the SDCBC been of no help. (related to why advocacy no show anymore?)

March 17, 2021

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