4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Baja teachers ordered back to schools, but many without this year's pay

Veronica worked at furniture store and sold tortillas

Around 100 teachers protested the lack of an institutional plan for the reopening of schools. - Image by Luis Guiterrez
Around 100 teachers protested the lack of an institutional plan for the reopening of schools.

Teachers from all levels will return to schools today in Baja California. They will take part in designing a strategy to make classrooms from the whole state a safe place of Covid for students. But some of them without full-time work have been almost a year without any pay.

Veronica asked not to publish her real name. She is a middle school biology teacher that has taught online since August last year and still she has not got any check from the state educational system. Baja California's government owes non-full-time teachers 40 million pesos ($2 million USD).

Veronica: “I have six groups of 55 or 60 students each in the evening. Now I work in the mornings at a furniture shop, and I even had to sell tortillas. Imagine how difficult it is to get back home and check the children's homework, give your class, prepare for the next day, and work in the morning for 200 pesos ($10 USD)."

She has been reporting this issue since the first month of delay, but the state authorities claim that is a federal matter.

“Sometimes I delay rent payments; thank God the landlord has waited for me. We made efforts to finish our careers, thinking it would be easier to get work, but it's the other way around."

Omaira Zamora, a middle school visual arts teacher, has had no pay since last August. This means a debt of 80 thousand pesos ($4,000 USD). As a visual arts professional, she found a way to make extra income by doing small designing jobs.

“At the beginning it was pretty slow because events stopped, but now people are getting active, so now I’m doing personalized designs for events. "I’m not against returning to classrooms; what I’m worried about is how I'm supposed to pay for gas to go to school or pay someone to babysit my daughters if I haven’t been paid."

Last Wednesday the National Coordinator of Education Workers held a demonstration in front of the educational offices in Tijuana. Around 100 teachers protested the lack of an institutional plan for the reopening of schools and pointed out the responsibility the government is putting on teachers.

Luis Reyes, an elementary school teacher, said: “It's not fair for us that the government is giving us responsibility to develop this plan. Our workload will be doubled. I understand it's part of our job, but it's impossible to do it when we have no financial stability, and when the government is not taking responsibility and has just decided to send us back to schools.”

The federal and the state governments stated that students will have to return to classrooms in August. According to the union leader Marco Pacheco, this is not enough time to get all the schools ready, especially those that have been vandalized during the pandemic.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

North County's tiny airports, Palomar Mountain water war

Too much water for Valley Center, a fight over non-native grass, goodbye to the Verboom dairy
Next Article

Bootstrap Kombucha goes for a hard ReBoot

Organic booch brand adds hard kombucha to its lineup
Around 100 teachers protested the lack of an institutional plan for the reopening of schools. - Image by Luis Guiterrez
Around 100 teachers protested the lack of an institutional plan for the reopening of schools.

Teachers from all levels will return to schools today in Baja California. They will take part in designing a strategy to make classrooms from the whole state a safe place of Covid for students. But some of them without full-time work have been almost a year without any pay.

Veronica asked not to publish her real name. She is a middle school biology teacher that has taught online since August last year and still she has not got any check from the state educational system. Baja California's government owes non-full-time teachers 40 million pesos ($2 million USD).

Veronica: “I have six groups of 55 or 60 students each in the evening. Now I work in the mornings at a furniture shop, and I even had to sell tortillas. Imagine how difficult it is to get back home and check the children's homework, give your class, prepare for the next day, and work in the morning for 200 pesos ($10 USD)."

She has been reporting this issue since the first month of delay, but the state authorities claim that is a federal matter.

“Sometimes I delay rent payments; thank God the landlord has waited for me. We made efforts to finish our careers, thinking it would be easier to get work, but it's the other way around."

Omaira Zamora, a middle school visual arts teacher, has had no pay since last August. This means a debt of 80 thousand pesos ($4,000 USD). As a visual arts professional, she found a way to make extra income by doing small designing jobs.

“At the beginning it was pretty slow because events stopped, but now people are getting active, so now I’m doing personalized designs for events. "I’m not against returning to classrooms; what I’m worried about is how I'm supposed to pay for gas to go to school or pay someone to babysit my daughters if I haven’t been paid."

Last Wednesday the National Coordinator of Education Workers held a demonstration in front of the educational offices in Tijuana. Around 100 teachers protested the lack of an institutional plan for the reopening of schools and pointed out the responsibility the government is putting on teachers.

Luis Reyes, an elementary school teacher, said: “It's not fair for us that the government is giving us responsibility to develop this plan. Our workload will be doubled. I understand it's part of our job, but it's impossible to do it when we have no financial stability, and when the government is not taking responsibility and has just decided to send us back to schools.”

The federal and the state governments stated that students will have to return to classrooms in August. According to the union leader Marco Pacheco, this is not enough time to get all the schools ready, especially those that have been vandalized during the pandemic.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

La Cresta Restaurant stands alone at 1600 feet

Crest’s only restaurant is a taco shop, bar, and dance club
Next Article

Bootstrap Kombucha goes for a hard ReBoot

Organic booch brand adds hard kombucha to its lineup
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close