4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

San Diego parks open for business

Restaurants, gyms, churches

Kate Sessions Park, Pacific Beach. Permit fees for gyms, fitness classes, restaurants, churches now waived. - Image by Thomas K. Arnold
Kate Sessions Park, Pacific Beach. Permit fees for gyms, fitness classes, restaurants, churches now waived.

City parks will temporarily make room for certain brick and mortar businesses to carry on outdoors - against Gov. Gavin Newsom’s regional stay-at-home order.

The San Diego City Council passed an emergency ordinance last week to aid the local economic recovery by waiving permit fees for gyms, fitness classes, restaurants and others displaced by the pandemic, including places of worship, to operate on public parkland.

Since Nov. 10, the city has been in the state's purple tier, which prohibits nonessential businesses from being open indoors. Outdoor gyms, however, are considered part of the essential workforce, helping maintain health, as long as there is physical distancing. Churches can also operate outdoors with modifications.

Restaurants, however, are currently barred from even outdoor operations. Last week the city of Encinitas stopped issuing temporary permits for outdoor dining until the state order is lifted.

Several restrictions, including a ban on outdoor dining, take effect when a region's intensive care unit capacity falls below 15 percent. Southern California now has zero percent ICU capacity.

The new ordinance expands on one proposed last July by councilmember Chris Cate, adding more types of businesses and not simply postponing fees but dropping them altogether.

San Diego has more than 450 parks.

Karen Dennison, assistant director of the city's parks and recreation department, said the ordinance is based on Mayor Faulconer's executive orders 10, 11 and 12, the latest issued on Dec. 30, and will carry out their terms.

"What is different from executive order 10 is that we have included certain businesses" to expand the opportunity for other San Diego entities to take advantage of the program, she said.

Only businesses with an existing storefront are eligible. Permits will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis. Social distancing and other local, state and federal Covid-19 guidelines will apply.

Fees will be waived until indoor operations can resume, or until Dec 31, 2021, whichever comes first. They are for grounds use, $58 - $173 per day; adult outdoor fitness, $44 per quarter; special events application fees, $150 per event; and special events late fees, $10 per day (max. $600).

There have been 105 permits issued to use public parkland since the initial ordinance last year. A large number were for adult fitness in community parks.

While the city has more than 450 parks, they're not spread equally. Lower-income communities such as Logan Heights and National City are considered "park poor."

Councilmember Vivian Moreno, whose district includes Logan Heights, said many communities in District 8 are densely populated with families who live in apartments and condos, and don't have a lot of green space. "The city parks serve as their backyard."

Councilmember Sean Elo-Rivera questioned how businesses in park-poor areas would fare, and asked that the city submit information to the environment committee on the businesses that end up using the park permit.

"We want to make sure the folks there can take advantage of this program as much as any other business."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Balifornia

“I was so upset over how things were going here, it was disturbing to my psyche.”
Kate Sessions Park, Pacific Beach. Permit fees for gyms, fitness classes, restaurants, churches now waived. - Image by Thomas K. Arnold
Kate Sessions Park, Pacific Beach. Permit fees for gyms, fitness classes, restaurants, churches now waived.

City parks will temporarily make room for certain brick and mortar businesses to carry on outdoors - against Gov. Gavin Newsom’s regional stay-at-home order.

The San Diego City Council passed an emergency ordinance last week to aid the local economic recovery by waiving permit fees for gyms, fitness classes, restaurants and others displaced by the pandemic, including places of worship, to operate on public parkland.

Since Nov. 10, the city has been in the state's purple tier, which prohibits nonessential businesses from being open indoors. Outdoor gyms, however, are considered part of the essential workforce, helping maintain health, as long as there is physical distancing. Churches can also operate outdoors with modifications.

Restaurants, however, are currently barred from even outdoor operations. Last week the city of Encinitas stopped issuing temporary permits for outdoor dining until the state order is lifted.

Several restrictions, including a ban on outdoor dining, take effect when a region's intensive care unit capacity falls below 15 percent. Southern California now has zero percent ICU capacity.

The new ordinance expands on one proposed last July by councilmember Chris Cate, adding more types of businesses and not simply postponing fees but dropping them altogether.

San Diego has more than 450 parks.

Karen Dennison, assistant director of the city's parks and recreation department, said the ordinance is based on Mayor Faulconer's executive orders 10, 11 and 12, the latest issued on Dec. 30, and will carry out their terms.

"What is different from executive order 10 is that we have included certain businesses" to expand the opportunity for other San Diego entities to take advantage of the program, she said.

Only businesses with an existing storefront are eligible. Permits will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis. Social distancing and other local, state and federal Covid-19 guidelines will apply.

Fees will be waived until indoor operations can resume, or until Dec 31, 2021, whichever comes first. They are for grounds use, $58 - $173 per day; adult outdoor fitness, $44 per quarter; special events application fees, $150 per event; and special events late fees, $10 per day (max. $600).

There have been 105 permits issued to use public parkland since the initial ordinance last year. A large number were for adult fitness in community parks.

While the city has more than 450 parks, they're not spread equally. Lower-income communities such as Logan Heights and National City are considered "park poor."

Councilmember Vivian Moreno, whose district includes Logan Heights, said many communities in District 8 are densely populated with families who live in apartments and condos, and don't have a lot of green space. "The city parks serve as their backyard."

Councilmember Sean Elo-Rivera questioned how businesses in park-poor areas would fare, and asked that the city submit information to the environment committee on the businesses that end up using the park permit.

"We want to make sure the folks there can take advantage of this program as much as any other business."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

The First Free Methodist Church of Escondido

We’ve been here for over a hundred years
Next Article

The coming Weber-Gonzalez catfight

101 Ash Street becomes make-work magnet for attorneys, lobbyists
Comments
2

Good idea. California has had the most stringent lockdowns since day one, and highest (we're now 3rd) per capita Covid cases in the nation. At times, I feel like we're doing all this for nothing. Outdoor gathering (with masks and social distancing, etc.) are safer than indoors, and now that we have a vaccine, it's time to slowly but surely start living again.

Jan. 19, 2021

But the "vaccine" is NOT YET distributed to all the population. NOT YET distributed to all age groups. The parks are more to the younger ages; time will take even more, for the younger until vaccination. Now that the time is into Democratic, maybe the leadership will change? As San Diego's longtime theme being of conservative. Conservative matches to what YOU say of California above.

Jan. 20, 2021

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close