4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Architect Frank L. Hope’s Del Mar Art Deco home

Hope’s more notable designs: Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, and the Great Western Bank tower downtown

The ocean view is nice, but look at the wood on that staircase and wall!
The ocean view is nice, but look at the wood on that staircase and wall!

Frank Hope Sr. was a World War I veteran and UC Berkeley dropout when he came to San Diego to work for the esteemed architectural firm Requa & Jackson. By 1928, he had struck out on his own and formed Frank L. Hope and Associates, designing homes and churches in a Mediterranean style he picked up from Requa before moving to the coast and adopting a modernist Art Deco aesthetic.

Some of Hope’s more notable designs included Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Logan Heights and the Great Western Bank tower downtown. After he passed the company on to his son, the firm picked up more notable commercial work, including the aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and SDCCU, nee Qualcomm, nee Jack Murphy, nee San Diego Stadium. Though derided as dated and functionally lacking as early as the 1990s by its baseball and football tenants, the Brutalist coliseum won several design awards when it opened in 1967.

What you’re really buying: primo beachfront.

Let’s take a look at the home Hope built for himself in 1946, a 2462-square-foot beach bungalow at 2312 Ocean Front in northern Del Mar. “Relax and rejuvenate as the sun shines and the waves crash on one of the finest white sand beaches in all of Southern California,” the opening of the property’s Zillow listing invites prospective buyers. But what of the house? From the street, there’s not really much to see. Google Maps leaves us standing in an alley paved with asphalt of questionable condition, the home mostly obscured on this side, though there is a window poking out of what looks like it was once a garage. On the other side of the alley is a two-car garage and a driveway with some extra parking. It’s easy to see why these photos were left off the listing.

Once we’re past the front gate, however, things start looking up. There’s a pleasant shaded brick courtyard with a large teak outdoor dining set and barbecue area, along with a cozy-looking seating area. And once inside, we’ll pass a beautiful and rich wood staircase that I wish got its own picture rather than the quick glance we get in the corner of a shot highlighting the oceanfront dining room. The ceilings are all coffered beam and have been painted white. Normally, it would be nice to see the original wood, but many of the walls retain their wood paneling, which lends a mid-century sensibility to the interior. The dining area is open to the living room, which offers a fireplace and wet bar. Beyond is the kitchen, which, compared to other multimillion-dollar residences, seems rather spartan in its narrow galley-style configuration. There is, at least, an opening in the wall to the dining area, and a window that serves as a pass-through to the open air bar on the back oceanfront deck. The base cabinets, while simple, are painted a friendly blue that goes well with an interesting seashell-scalloped backsplash.

Upstairs, the four bedrooms are just fine, but there’s nothing special to see. We also get a shot of the attached “family room,” which functions as a studio with its own kitchen. Steps down from raised foundation to slab level seem to confirm that this was likely once a garage.

Although the house is nice, what we’re really buying here is 50 feet of prime oceanfront property, where a quick hop over the seawall has you sitting on the prime piece of sand mentioned in the listing. Another brick patio extends right to the beach’s edge, granting great access to summer people-watching and, as the listing boasts, “exquisite sunsets.”

Public records list a Williams family trust as the home’s current owner. It’s not currently owner occupied, and has been offered for rent in recent years for as much as $10,000 per month during the Del Mar racing season, when wealthy out-of-towners flock to the horse track just north of the beach. The county assessor values the property at just under $250,000, meaning it’s been quite a while since it’s changed hands.

Hope’s Ocean Front estate was first listed for sale in early August, its asking price of $13,950,000 remains unchanged to date.

  • 2312 Ocean Front | Del Mar, 92014
  • Current owner: Williams Trust | Listing price: $13,950,000 | Beds: 4 | Baths: 4 | House size: 2462
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Chi Chi’s Mexican Cantina: new name in Old Town

A reminder of what a concentrated collision of tastes a taco can be
Next Article

Comes with a plastic bag of cemetery dirt

The Yucks, SeeYouSpaceCowboy, Crush of Souls, Tolan Shaw, JT Moring
The ocean view is nice, but look at the wood on that staircase and wall!
The ocean view is nice, but look at the wood on that staircase and wall!

Frank Hope Sr. was a World War I veteran and UC Berkeley dropout when he came to San Diego to work for the esteemed architectural firm Requa & Jackson. By 1928, he had struck out on his own and formed Frank L. Hope and Associates, designing homes and churches in a Mediterranean style he picked up from Requa before moving to the coast and adopting a modernist Art Deco aesthetic.

Some of Hope’s more notable designs included Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Logan Heights and the Great Western Bank tower downtown. After he passed the company on to his son, the firm picked up more notable commercial work, including the aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and SDCCU, nee Qualcomm, nee Jack Murphy, nee San Diego Stadium. Though derided as dated and functionally lacking as early as the 1990s by its baseball and football tenants, the Brutalist coliseum won several design awards when it opened in 1967.

What you’re really buying: primo beachfront.

Let’s take a look at the home Hope built for himself in 1946, a 2462-square-foot beach bungalow at 2312 Ocean Front in northern Del Mar. “Relax and rejuvenate as the sun shines and the waves crash on one of the finest white sand beaches in all of Southern California,” the opening of the property’s Zillow listing invites prospective buyers. But what of the house? From the street, there’s not really much to see. Google Maps leaves us standing in an alley paved with asphalt of questionable condition, the home mostly obscured on this side, though there is a window poking out of what looks like it was once a garage. On the other side of the alley is a two-car garage and a driveway with some extra parking. It’s easy to see why these photos were left off the listing.

Once we’re past the front gate, however, things start looking up. There’s a pleasant shaded brick courtyard with a large teak outdoor dining set and barbecue area, along with a cozy-looking seating area. And once inside, we’ll pass a beautiful and rich wood staircase that I wish got its own picture rather than the quick glance we get in the corner of a shot highlighting the oceanfront dining room. The ceilings are all coffered beam and have been painted white. Normally, it would be nice to see the original wood, but many of the walls retain their wood paneling, which lends a mid-century sensibility to the interior. The dining area is open to the living room, which offers a fireplace and wet bar. Beyond is the kitchen, which, compared to other multimillion-dollar residences, seems rather spartan in its narrow galley-style configuration. There is, at least, an opening in the wall to the dining area, and a window that serves as a pass-through to the open air bar on the back oceanfront deck. The base cabinets, while simple, are painted a friendly blue that goes well with an interesting seashell-scalloped backsplash.

Upstairs, the four bedrooms are just fine, but there’s nothing special to see. We also get a shot of the attached “family room,” which functions as a studio with its own kitchen. Steps down from raised foundation to slab level seem to confirm that this was likely once a garage.

Although the house is nice, what we’re really buying here is 50 feet of prime oceanfront property, where a quick hop over the seawall has you sitting on the prime piece of sand mentioned in the listing. Another brick patio extends right to the beach’s edge, granting great access to summer people-watching and, as the listing boasts, “exquisite sunsets.”

Public records list a Williams family trust as the home’s current owner. It’s not currently owner occupied, and has been offered for rent in recent years for as much as $10,000 per month during the Del Mar racing season, when wealthy out-of-towners flock to the horse track just north of the beach. The county assessor values the property at just under $250,000, meaning it’s been quite a while since it’s changed hands.

Hope’s Ocean Front estate was first listed for sale in early August, its asking price of $13,950,000 remains unchanged to date.

  • 2312 Ocean Front | Del Mar, 92014
  • Current owner: Williams Trust | Listing price: $13,950,000 | Beds: 4 | Baths: 4 | House size: 2462
Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Celebrate the 27th James Bond film with the 6th James Bond film

No Time to Die indeed
Next Article

Mead and other boozy revivals

Find your special place at the local renn fest
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close