4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Roberto Flores' phone call behind his illegal weapon charge

Girlfriend, home with four-day-old baby, hesitates

"Sell it for what it’s worth, because that’s a thousand-dollar, ARs aren’t cheap."
"Sell it for what it’s worth, because that’s a thousand-dollar, ARs aren’t cheap."

Roberto made a collect call to his girlfriend Lizzie in Oceanside, from the jail in Vista, on March 27, 2017. The call cost her about twelve dollars, they talked more than 20 minutes.

As is the routine for jails, the call was recorded, and a prosecutor later used Roberto’s statements as evidence.

Flores: "He has made me go through something that I know that shouldn’t have been. This is doing me dirty."

Roberto Ignacio Flores, 25, was recorded at the beginning of the call identifying himself as “Miranda Rights.”

When they connected, Roberto said, “Hello beautiful. What are you doin’?”

Lizzie answered, “I’m currently changing our son’s diaper.” She had recently given birth, their son was just four days old. The baby could be heard making pleasant baby noises.

But jail background clatter was loud. Roberto said "Huh?" or "What?" or "I can’t hear you" at least 37 times during their 22-minute conversation.

Multi-felon Roberto quickly moved the conversation from his baby to the items which police had confiscated four days earlier, from the baby’s room, on the same day that he was arrested. His in-laws had found an illegal weapon and body armor and other things, hidden behind a bookcase, while they were tidying up the room for the new baby’s arrival.

“I want you to tell me if you’re going to take ownership of that property, because none of that property is illegal for somebody that doesn’t have a felony,” Roberto informed the mother of his child.

Because 25-year-old Roberto had prior arrests and convictions, as a felon he was not allowed to be in possession of a firearm. But the young mother of his baby had no criminal record at all.

Lizzie hesitated, and her baby started crying, and then Lizzie told her not-husband, “I don’t think that my Dad will let me. I’ll try.”

Roberto complained that the weapon was confiscated and would be held as evidence if Lizzie did not claim it. “So that’s a lot of money that’s gonna go down the drain. Nothing of it is illegal.”

Roberto wanted Lizzie to tell authorities that he did not live there with her, at her family’s home. “I don’t even know the address there,” he declared.

Roberto then seemed to threaten Lizzie’s brother; perhaps he believed he was the one who had snitched on him. “Just tell him that they might release me today or tomorrow, and I hope to God he, uh, has something to tell me when I’m there.” Lizzie’s loud sigh was recorded. It was not her brother who tipped off police, but no one bothered to tell Roberto, and he went on, “Because he has made me go through something that I know that shouldn’t have been. This is doing me dirty. Like really dirty.”

“You just tell him that I’m a be out, if I’m not out today, I’m a be out in less than a month.” He was right about that. Roberto was released from custody in about one month.

“Yeah, I’m gonna walk it home or I’m gonna take the bus to you and I’m a be right there in front of him. I want you to tell him personally I’m a be out, 'cause whatever he’s thought he was gonna accomplish with his setup, it didn’t work. And it’s not gonna work. And I need you to claim that property so you can sell that property.”

Roberto told Lizzie, “I mean, sell it for what it’s worth, because that’s a thousand-dollar, ARs aren’t cheap, supposedly… that’s over a thousand dollars worth of value that they want to keep illegally through their search and seizure.”

Lizzie soothed her baby and said “Uh huh.”

Roberto wanted to know if Lizzie had given permission to police to search the baby’s room, which was also her bedroom. “I didn’t say anything, I wasn’t here.” Lizzie was still at hospital with their baby when police came to her home.

Roberto complained again that he was not able to hear her, and Lizzie whispered, “I know, I’m trying to be quiet, because if I say anything any louder, anything, they’ll tell my friends I’m talking to you.” Apparently people who knew Lizzie might not think Roberto was a good thing for her.

Roberto wanted to know, “If you’re gonna do that for me or not? If you’re gonna, tell me if you’re gonna take that property or not? It’s just a yes or a no.”

Lizzie hesitated, and then replied, “I want to but I don’t know if my Dad will let me, is the thing.”

He pressed her, “As my partner, are you? Yes or no?”

Lizzie sighed, then said "Sure" and "Yeah, I guess."

Roberto Flores was in custody for felony possession of assault weapon for about one month (he was taken into custody on March 24, 2017). He was released on bail, and was at liberty three months later, when he drove his car into an Oceanside motorcycle cop on June 19, 2017.

ONE-DAY TRIAL

Roberto Flores was convicted of attempted murder of a police officer, and possession of illegal weapon, and other charges in 2017, but those convictions were overturned on a legal technicality by a California appellate court, and Roberto got a new trial in August 2021.

During the re-trial, the weapon was presented in court as evidence. Prosecutor Keith Watanabe took the long, black weapon out of a cardboard box and held it aloft for the jury to see. At the same moment, everyone in the jury box adjusted their seats, the substantial weapon made an impression on the jury of seven women and five men.

An expert testified as to why the weapon was considered an illegal “assault weapon” in California. He wrote a report and made a brief summary to the jury. It seemed to do with lack of serial number, the ammo magazine, the pistol grip, a perforated shroud on the barrel, plus other issues.

The jury deliberated less than one hour before unanimously agreeing that Roberto Flores, 30, was guilty of both felony charges, possession of firearm and illegal assault weapon. The jury heard evidence and came to a conclusion the same day, on August 12.

Roberto Ignacio Flores, 30, will be sentenced for the illegal weapon charges, plus the attempted murder of the Oceanside cop, and his other convictions, the morning of September 7, 2021. The case will be presided by the same judge who heard all his re-trials, Honorable judge Carlos Armour.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Reasons the line has slowed at San Ysidro gate

Migrants rushing, gaviotas cutting – not to mention the Baja 1000
Next Article

Six-pack reycling hack

80% of PakTech can carriers placed in recycling bins went landfills.
"Sell it for what it’s worth, because that’s a thousand-dollar, ARs aren’t cheap."
"Sell it for what it’s worth, because that’s a thousand-dollar, ARs aren’t cheap."

Roberto made a collect call to his girlfriend Lizzie in Oceanside, from the jail in Vista, on March 27, 2017. The call cost her about twelve dollars, they talked more than 20 minutes.

As is the routine for jails, the call was recorded, and a prosecutor later used Roberto’s statements as evidence.

Flores: "He has made me go through something that I know that shouldn’t have been. This is doing me dirty."

Roberto Ignacio Flores, 25, was recorded at the beginning of the call identifying himself as “Miranda Rights.”

When they connected, Roberto said, “Hello beautiful. What are you doin’?”

Lizzie answered, “I’m currently changing our son’s diaper.” She had recently given birth, their son was just four days old. The baby could be heard making pleasant baby noises.

But jail background clatter was loud. Roberto said "Huh?" or "What?" or "I can’t hear you" at least 37 times during their 22-minute conversation.

Multi-felon Roberto quickly moved the conversation from his baby to the items which police had confiscated four days earlier, from the baby’s room, on the same day that he was arrested. His in-laws had found an illegal weapon and body armor and other things, hidden behind a bookcase, while they were tidying up the room for the new baby’s arrival.

“I want you to tell me if you’re going to take ownership of that property, because none of that property is illegal for somebody that doesn’t have a felony,” Roberto informed the mother of his child.

Because 25-year-old Roberto had prior arrests and convictions, as a felon he was not allowed to be in possession of a firearm. But the young mother of his baby had no criminal record at all.

Lizzie hesitated, and her baby started crying, and then Lizzie told her not-husband, “I don’t think that my Dad will let me. I’ll try.”

Roberto complained that the weapon was confiscated and would be held as evidence if Lizzie did not claim it. “So that’s a lot of money that’s gonna go down the drain. Nothing of it is illegal.”

Roberto wanted Lizzie to tell authorities that he did not live there with her, at her family’s home. “I don’t even know the address there,” he declared.

Roberto then seemed to threaten Lizzie’s brother; perhaps he believed he was the one who had snitched on him. “Just tell him that they might release me today or tomorrow, and I hope to God he, uh, has something to tell me when I’m there.” Lizzie’s loud sigh was recorded. It was not her brother who tipped off police, but no one bothered to tell Roberto, and he went on, “Because he has made me go through something that I know that shouldn’t have been. This is doing me dirty. Like really dirty.”

“You just tell him that I’m a be out, if I’m not out today, I’m a be out in less than a month.” He was right about that. Roberto was released from custody in about one month.

“Yeah, I’m gonna walk it home or I’m gonna take the bus to you and I’m a be right there in front of him. I want you to tell him personally I’m a be out, 'cause whatever he’s thought he was gonna accomplish with his setup, it didn’t work. And it’s not gonna work. And I need you to claim that property so you can sell that property.”

Roberto told Lizzie, “I mean, sell it for what it’s worth, because that’s a thousand-dollar, ARs aren’t cheap, supposedly… that’s over a thousand dollars worth of value that they want to keep illegally through their search and seizure.”

Lizzie soothed her baby and said “Uh huh.”

Roberto wanted to know if Lizzie had given permission to police to search the baby’s room, which was also her bedroom. “I didn’t say anything, I wasn’t here.” Lizzie was still at hospital with their baby when police came to her home.

Roberto complained again that he was not able to hear her, and Lizzie whispered, “I know, I’m trying to be quiet, because if I say anything any louder, anything, they’ll tell my friends I’m talking to you.” Apparently people who knew Lizzie might not think Roberto was a good thing for her.

Roberto wanted to know, “If you’re gonna do that for me or not? If you’re gonna, tell me if you’re gonna take that property or not? It’s just a yes or a no.”

Lizzie hesitated, and then replied, “I want to but I don’t know if my Dad will let me, is the thing.”

He pressed her, “As my partner, are you? Yes or no?”

Lizzie sighed, then said "Sure" and "Yeah, I guess."

Roberto Flores was in custody for felony possession of assault weapon for about one month (he was taken into custody on March 24, 2017). He was released on bail, and was at liberty three months later, when he drove his car into an Oceanside motorcycle cop on June 19, 2017.

ONE-DAY TRIAL

Roberto Flores was convicted of attempted murder of a police officer, and possession of illegal weapon, and other charges in 2017, but those convictions were overturned on a legal technicality by a California appellate court, and Roberto got a new trial in August 2021.

During the re-trial, the weapon was presented in court as evidence. Prosecutor Keith Watanabe took the long, black weapon out of a cardboard box and held it aloft for the jury to see. At the same moment, everyone in the jury box adjusted their seats, the substantial weapon made an impression on the jury of seven women and five men.

An expert testified as to why the weapon was considered an illegal “assault weapon” in California. He wrote a report and made a brief summary to the jury. It seemed to do with lack of serial number, the ammo magazine, the pistol grip, a perforated shroud on the barrel, plus other issues.

The jury deliberated less than one hour before unanimously agreeing that Roberto Flores, 30, was guilty of both felony charges, possession of firearm and illegal assault weapon. The jury heard evidence and came to a conclusion the same day, on August 12.

Roberto Ignacio Flores, 30, will be sentenced for the illegal weapon charges, plus the attempted murder of the Oceanside cop, and his other convictions, the morning of September 7, 2021. The case will be presided by the same judge who heard all his re-trials, Honorable judge Carlos Armour.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Mayor explains decision to educate commuters by flooding portion of I-5

Puddle Pedagogy
Next Article

Edwin Arnold: author of The Light of Asia and winner of prestigious Newdigate Prize

Three poems: December, A Song, Destiny
Comments
1

Today, on the day of sentencing for his re-trial, Roberto Flores refused to come into the courtroom, instead he was in an adjoining room where he could hear, the judge said.

Both the cop who survived, Brad Hunter, and his wife Vanessa spoke to the judge before sentence was pronounced.

Mrs. Hunter said she let her guard down because her husband was so near the end of his police career, so she was shocked when she got that phone call informing her that her husband had been injured and he was being helicoptered to hospital. But they both rebounded, she said, “My husband is not just a survivor, he is a thriver.” And she addressed the man who tried to kill her husband, “Roberto, as soon as I learned that you did this on purpose, I sought to negate your evil in this world.” She said she organized a blood drive with the Oceanside police, and they collected more than 300 pints of blood. “I sought to save lives, because you tried to kill my husband that day!”

Both Mr. and Mrs. Hunter sat through the second trial, they were present in the gallery each day. They both despaired that Roberto never expressed any remorse. She said, “I think you are more evil today than the day you tried to kill my husband!” And, “I have not forgiven you for trying to kill my husband, I will work on that while you are in prison.” Mrs. Hunter asked the judge, “Please protect my family and the community from him, and sentence him to the maximum.”

Brad Hunter said “My scars are still very graphic in appearance” and his wife revealed that people who see his scars always ask, “Is that a shark bite?” The survivor cop told the judge, “I have no doubt that given another opportunity, Mister Flores will try to kill another cop, perhaps with a better plan and a different outcome.”

Honorable judge Carlos O. Armour did give Roberto Flores the maximum sentence, 28 years to Life. He remarked that it was a “cowardly attack” when Flores drove his car into the cop, who was standing in the street and speaking to another person at that moment.

After the sentencing, tireless prosecutor Keith Watanabe released a statement, “I’m thankful that we finally brought justice to officer Hunter and the entire law enforcement family.” 

Sept. 7, 2021

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close