4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

No delay for deletion of parking on 30th Street

City cycling manager swears the mayor’s order doesn’t make it official

The original planned route stretched from Juniper to Howard streets. The modified plan added another six tenths of a mile north to Adams.
The original planned route stretched from Juniper to Howard streets. The modified plan added another six tenths of a mile north to Adams.

When is a project not a project? That’s what lawyers for North Park dwellers who have sued to maintain access to their homes on 30th Street want to know.

Maybe it’s when you add a plus sign to the old title, like when plan Option A became Option A+. Maybe it’s when you break ground. City employees swear under oath that the plan to remove parking on 30th Street in order to create bike lanes is not a project. The judge decided he won’t order them to stop working on their plans until after the court case is heard.

Supporters say the city will create more parking on nearby streets.

By city logic, the removal of 450 parking spaces along 30th Street won’t be a project until the construction is completed. Even then, it won’t be a project that requires review under the California Environmental Quality Act. Repeated calls and emails to the city attorney did not elicit a response for comment. However, city documents filed in the court case are publicly available and have been reviewed. The city maintains there are no engineering designs and plans, and therefore, there is no project. But a stop-work order would increase costs for the not-yet created effort by $250,000, the filings say.

The 30th Street bike lanes non-project idea was launched in November 2018 when Matt Stucky, an attorney and member of several North Park neighborhood groups, decided his 7-year-old daughter needed to be able to bicycle to get ice cream. Stucky, who numbers among his friends City Council District 3’s policy director Kathleen Ferrier, first proposed the idea in November 2018 at a meeting of the city’s defunct Bicycle Advisory Committee. Since the city was already tearing up 30th Street for pipeline replacement, he said, it seemed like a good time to reconfigure the street by adding bike lanes. The original planned route stretched from Juniper to Howard streets, creating Class IV cycle tracks and eliminated 420 parking spaces. The modified plan added another six tenths of a mile all the way north to Adams, but promises to leave 100 of the 550 parking spaces along the 2.4 mile route that’s host to homes and apartments, businesses and restaurants.

Supporters say the city will create more parking on nearby streets and continue to point to the pay-to-park parking garage on 29th St. and North Park Way as a solution to lost parking.

Those living there and businesses say that they will be harmed by the loss of parking – including blue handicapped parking spaces residents and businesses paid for that will be eliminated or moved blocks away. They’ve faced opposition from their own city council representative, Chris Ward, who at one point told a 30-year resident that if parking was important to her, she should live somewhere else. His staff said he later apologized.

The plan went to the North Park Planning Committee in March 2019 for its first properly noticed presentation. Business groups along the route that had been working on the idea for several years – including hiring and then firing Ferrier – over her insistence on removing as much parking as possible despite their goal of balancing business, resident, and cyclist interests.

In May 2019, Mayor Kevin Faulconer ordered the city to proceed with designing the project, called Option A. But the city now says that was scrapped for a new project on 30th from Juniper to Adams called Option A+.

Everett Hauser, ranked as one of the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition’s Top 10 riders this month, had also been hired by the city as its mobility program manager a month before the first discussion at the bicycle board and was present for the discussion heard by three of the board’s 11 members.

In a sworn declaration to the court, Hauser describes himself as “the project manager for the proposed bicycle facility along the 30th street corridor.” He promises that there are no engineering plans drawn up for Option A+. But, he swore, to delay the lanes until an environmental review could be done would cost the city an additional $250,000.

Sherman argues that when Faulconer issued the May 16, 2019 memo ordering the city staff to design the 30th Street route, then set to run from Juniper to Howard street, he created a project that must be reviewed for its impacts. Changes to that original plan do not release the city from its legal obligation, he says.

“This is all smoke and mirrors,” Sherman says. “They said it’s not a final design until it’s built. But we know it can’t go to final design until it’s approved.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Oceanside's Michelle Gomez sues ex-workers for libel and gets some to back off

But not Robert Leahy
Next Article

Clout chasing with 50 cent

J. Suarez opines on the president/hip-hop connection
The original planned route stretched from Juniper to Howard streets. The modified plan added another six tenths of a mile north to Adams.
The original planned route stretched from Juniper to Howard streets. The modified plan added another six tenths of a mile north to Adams.

When is a project not a project? That’s what lawyers for North Park dwellers who have sued to maintain access to their homes on 30th Street want to know.

Maybe it’s when you add a plus sign to the old title, like when plan Option A became Option A+. Maybe it’s when you break ground. City employees swear under oath that the plan to remove parking on 30th Street in order to create bike lanes is not a project. The judge decided he won’t order them to stop working on their plans until after the court case is heard.

Supporters say the city will create more parking on nearby streets.

By city logic, the removal of 450 parking spaces along 30th Street won’t be a project until the construction is completed. Even then, it won’t be a project that requires review under the California Environmental Quality Act. Repeated calls and emails to the city attorney did not elicit a response for comment. However, city documents filed in the court case are publicly available and have been reviewed. The city maintains there are no engineering designs and plans, and therefore, there is no project. But a stop-work order would increase costs for the not-yet created effort by $250,000, the filings say.

The 30th Street bike lanes non-project idea was launched in November 2018 when Matt Stucky, an attorney and member of several North Park neighborhood groups, decided his 7-year-old daughter needed to be able to bicycle to get ice cream. Stucky, who numbers among his friends City Council District 3’s policy director Kathleen Ferrier, first proposed the idea in November 2018 at a meeting of the city’s defunct Bicycle Advisory Committee. Since the city was already tearing up 30th Street for pipeline replacement, he said, it seemed like a good time to reconfigure the street by adding bike lanes. The original planned route stretched from Juniper to Howard streets, creating Class IV cycle tracks and eliminated 420 parking spaces. The modified plan added another six tenths of a mile all the way north to Adams, but promises to leave 100 of the 550 parking spaces along the 2.4 mile route that’s host to homes and apartments, businesses and restaurants.

Supporters say the city will create more parking on nearby streets and continue to point to the pay-to-park parking garage on 29th St. and North Park Way as a solution to lost parking.

Those living there and businesses say that they will be harmed by the loss of parking – including blue handicapped parking spaces residents and businesses paid for that will be eliminated or moved blocks away. They’ve faced opposition from their own city council representative, Chris Ward, who at one point told a 30-year resident that if parking was important to her, she should live somewhere else. His staff said he later apologized.

The plan went to the North Park Planning Committee in March 2019 for its first properly noticed presentation. Business groups along the route that had been working on the idea for several years – including hiring and then firing Ferrier – over her insistence on removing as much parking as possible despite their goal of balancing business, resident, and cyclist interests.

In May 2019, Mayor Kevin Faulconer ordered the city to proceed with designing the project, called Option A. But the city now says that was scrapped for a new project on 30th from Juniper to Adams called Option A+.

Everett Hauser, ranked as one of the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition’s Top 10 riders this month, had also been hired by the city as its mobility program manager a month before the first discussion at the bicycle board and was present for the discussion heard by three of the board’s 11 members.

In a sworn declaration to the court, Hauser describes himself as “the project manager for the proposed bicycle facility along the 30th street corridor.” He promises that there are no engineering plans drawn up for Option A+. But, he swore, to delay the lanes until an environmental review could be done would cost the city an additional $250,000.

Sherman argues that when Faulconer issued the May 16, 2019 memo ordering the city staff to design the 30th Street route, then set to run from Juniper to Howard street, he created a project that must be reviewed for its impacts. Changes to that original plan do not release the city from its legal obligation, he says.

“This is all smoke and mirrors,” Sherman says. “They said it’s not a final design until it’s built. But we know it can’t go to final design until it’s approved.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Race in 19th century San Diego, Marilyn Monroe in Coronado, early drive-in theaters

My Lester Bangs, 100 years ago, before the Gaslamp
Next Article

McDonald’s sauce gun trivia

At what point does quirky hipster knowledge become so obscure its essentially useless?
Comments
2

" if parking was important to her, she should live somewhere else"

A politician should never be so blunt. And yet he is correct. Nobody with a car lives on 42nd St in NYC. It's either bicycles, taxis or mass transportation. Inner city San Diego will have to adapt as well. I live in an old bldg in Hillcrest with indoor parking for my car and my motorcycle. This is extremely rare and will become more so. Autonomous rideshare vehicles will probably make vehicle ownership even less desirable in the future.

Sept. 28, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Sept. 28, 2020

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close