4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

State auditor knocks San Diego suicide program

Why is Termini family greasing Todd Gloria's palms?

Suicidal hilarity

A $1.3 million, state-funded, online suicide prevention program commissioned by the San Diego County Office of Education and promoted by the Union-Tribune is too expensive for most California school districts, says an audit released September 29 by California State Auditor Elaine Howle. A vendor hired by San Diego “supplied its preexisting online training and agreed to provide it to a total of 66,000 school personnel and students,” says the document. But auditors are skeptical about future use. “According to [California’s Department of Education], the funding the Legislature appropriated could not meet the training needs of all middle and high school staff and students in California, but it is advocating for the State to continue funding the training program in subsequent years. We question whether this is a cost‐effective approach to providing such training. At the rate the vendor charged for the licenses, it will cost more than $13.5 million per year to provide this training to every [local educational agency] teacher and staff member throughout the State.”

State auditor Elaine Howle: San Diego County education office’s suicide prevention program is too expensive.

The problem of student suicide is growing, notes Howle’s cover letter. “From 2009 through 2018, the annual number of suicides of youth ages 12 through 19 increased 15 percent, and incidents of self-harm increased 50 percent.” Every one of the three school districts and three charter schools, including the San Francisco Unified School District, reviewed by Howle’s office “failed to adopt policies and provide training” that met the suicide prevention requirements of 2016 legislation. “In the absence of adequate mental health professional staffing, the State’s rates of youth suicide and self-harm have continued to climb.”

San Diego’s Office of Education website identifies the program’s vendor as Canada-founded LivingWorks. A September video blog by the Union-Tribune said the newspaper was sponsoring an upcoming virtual youth summit by LivingWorks without mention of public costs and controversy. “On September 15, the LivingWorks Virtual Youth Summit will bring together a mix of performing artists, social media influencers, and motivational speakers to share a message of hope, resilience, and suicide prevention,” according to a YouTube blurb.Jarrod Hindman, vice president of community development at LivingWorks and Monica Nepomuceno, an education consultant at the California Department of Education, will join us for a preview of this unique and informative event.”

Added U-T public relations director Luis Cruz: “TikTok star and comedian Caitlin O’Reilly will be MCing the online streaming event. She is hilarious, so I can’t wait to tune in.”

In an emailed statement, Music Watson, chief of staff for the San Diego County Office of Education responded to the audit: “We concur with the California state auditor that schools should implement appropriate suicide prevention policies; train their faculty and staff to recognize and respond to youth who are at risk of suicide or self-harm; and employ an adequate number of professionals, such as school counselors, who can provide mental health services. That being said, we disagree with the audit’s conclusion that few local education agencies will have access to the online suicide prevention training program being rolled out across California.”

Real estate developer Brad Termini gave $50,000 to a PAC backing Todd Gloria.

Termini family Gloria gifts

Well-heeled San Diego candidates continue to come up with their own money to finance their campaigns. At the top rung is La Jolla city councilwoman Barbara Bry, running against fellow Democrat, Assemblyman Todd Gloria for mayor. She gave her campaign fund $75,000 on September 28. Republican lawyer Joe Leventhal, running for the Fifth District council seat now held by termed-out ex-Republican Mark Kersey, wrote a check to his campaign for $20,000 on September 19... In family matters, Brad Termini, chief executive of Encinitas-based real estate deveklopment group Zephyr Partners, and Stefanie Termini each kicked in a hefty $50,000 last October to an independent political committee backing Gloria’s race for mayor. Besides development activity in San Diego county, Termini has been pitching a so-called cannabis campus in Buffalo, New York. “Company officials told reporters they plan to invest $200 million in private money to build the campus, which will not only be used as an incubator space and education for students at SUNY Erie, but also for commercial purposes,” reported radio station WBEN in a February 2019 dispatch.

Brad and Stefanie also kicked in $2300 each for Gloria’s controlled campaign committee. September 19 Termini family Gloria givers, each at $1150, were Bridget, Dominic, Rocco, and Shelby, all of Buffalo.

Complaint form malfeasance

Interim San Diego city auditor Kyle Elser is out with an audit questioning the job San Diego police are doing with complaint handling. “We found that SDPD’s complaint process requires accepting, investigating, and reporting complaints, including anonymous and third-party complaints,” says the September 28 report. “However, we found that SDPD’s complaint forms are not as readily accessible as Best Practices require, and the Community Review Board on Police Practices’ online complaint form embedded on SDPD’s website includes statements and requirements that may inadvertently discourage the submission of anonymous or third-party complaints.”

Continues the audit: “Additionally, there is an inherent risk that sergeants may not always follow procedure, and we found this risk is increased for the complaint process due to several recent changes to the complaints procedure and practices. This could result in some complaints being incorrectly classified and documented, preventing SDPD and the public from identifying and addressing potential misconduct.”

— Matt Potter

(@sdmattpotter)

[Source of graph at top: Analysis of hospital encounter data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development]

The Reader offers $25 for news tips published in this column. Call our voice mail at 619-235-3000, ext. 440, or sandiegoreader.com/staff/matt-potter/contact/.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Appalled by cigarette ad, frightened by Gloria

Under the slavery of San Diego developers

Suicidal hilarity

A $1.3 million, state-funded, online suicide prevention program commissioned by the San Diego County Office of Education and promoted by the Union-Tribune is too expensive for most California school districts, says an audit released September 29 by California State Auditor Elaine Howle. A vendor hired by San Diego “supplied its preexisting online training and agreed to provide it to a total of 66,000 school personnel and students,” says the document. But auditors are skeptical about future use. “According to [California’s Department of Education], the funding the Legislature appropriated could not meet the training needs of all middle and high school staff and students in California, but it is advocating for the State to continue funding the training program in subsequent years. We question whether this is a cost‐effective approach to providing such training. At the rate the vendor charged for the licenses, it will cost more than $13.5 million per year to provide this training to every [local educational agency] teacher and staff member throughout the State.”

State auditor Elaine Howle: San Diego County education office’s suicide prevention program is too expensive.

The problem of student suicide is growing, notes Howle’s cover letter. “From 2009 through 2018, the annual number of suicides of youth ages 12 through 19 increased 15 percent, and incidents of self-harm increased 50 percent.” Every one of the three school districts and three charter schools, including the San Francisco Unified School District, reviewed by Howle’s office “failed to adopt policies and provide training” that met the suicide prevention requirements of 2016 legislation. “In the absence of adequate mental health professional staffing, the State’s rates of youth suicide and self-harm have continued to climb.”

San Diego’s Office of Education website identifies the program’s vendor as Canada-founded LivingWorks. A September video blog by the Union-Tribune said the newspaper was sponsoring an upcoming virtual youth summit by LivingWorks without mention of public costs and controversy. “On September 15, the LivingWorks Virtual Youth Summit will bring together a mix of performing artists, social media influencers, and motivational speakers to share a message of hope, resilience, and suicide prevention,” according to a YouTube blurb.Jarrod Hindman, vice president of community development at LivingWorks and Monica Nepomuceno, an education consultant at the California Department of Education, will join us for a preview of this unique and informative event.”

Added U-T public relations director Luis Cruz: “TikTok star and comedian Caitlin O’Reilly will be MCing the online streaming event. She is hilarious, so I can’t wait to tune in.”

In an emailed statement, Music Watson, chief of staff for the San Diego County Office of Education responded to the audit: “We concur with the California state auditor that schools should implement appropriate suicide prevention policies; train their faculty and staff to recognize and respond to youth who are at risk of suicide or self-harm; and employ an adequate number of professionals, such as school counselors, who can provide mental health services. That being said, we disagree with the audit’s conclusion that few local education agencies will have access to the online suicide prevention training program being rolled out across California.”

Real estate developer Brad Termini gave $50,000 to a PAC backing Todd Gloria.

Termini family Gloria gifts

Well-heeled San Diego candidates continue to come up with their own money to finance their campaigns. At the top rung is La Jolla city councilwoman Barbara Bry, running against fellow Democrat, Assemblyman Todd Gloria for mayor. She gave her campaign fund $75,000 on September 28. Republican lawyer Joe Leventhal, running for the Fifth District council seat now held by termed-out ex-Republican Mark Kersey, wrote a check to his campaign for $20,000 on September 19... In family matters, Brad Termini, chief executive of Encinitas-based real estate deveklopment group Zephyr Partners, and Stefanie Termini each kicked in a hefty $50,000 last October to an independent political committee backing Gloria’s race for mayor. Besides development activity in San Diego county, Termini has been pitching a so-called cannabis campus in Buffalo, New York. “Company officials told reporters they plan to invest $200 million in private money to build the campus, which will not only be used as an incubator space and education for students at SUNY Erie, but also for commercial purposes,” reported radio station WBEN in a February 2019 dispatch.

Brad and Stefanie also kicked in $2300 each for Gloria’s controlled campaign committee. September 19 Termini family Gloria givers, each at $1150, were Bridget, Dominic, Rocco, and Shelby, all of Buffalo.

Complaint form malfeasance

Interim San Diego city auditor Kyle Elser is out with an audit questioning the job San Diego police are doing with complaint handling. “We found that SDPD’s complaint process requires accepting, investigating, and reporting complaints, including anonymous and third-party complaints,” says the September 28 report. “However, we found that SDPD’s complaint forms are not as readily accessible as Best Practices require, and the Community Review Board on Police Practices’ online complaint form embedded on SDPD’s website includes statements and requirements that may inadvertently discourage the submission of anonymous or third-party complaints.”

Continues the audit: “Additionally, there is an inherent risk that sergeants may not always follow procedure, and we found this risk is increased for the complaint process due to several recent changes to the complaints procedure and practices. This could result in some complaints being incorrectly classified and documented, preventing SDPD and the public from identifying and addressing potential misconduct.”

— Matt Potter

(@sdmattpotter)

[Source of graph at top: Analysis of hospital encounter data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development]

The Reader offers $25 for news tips published in this column. Call our voice mail at 619-235-3000, ext. 440, or sandiegoreader.com/staff/matt-potter/contact/.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Charger Corey Liuget gives $1000 to Barbara Bry

SeaBreeze Vacation Rentals helps Todd Gloria
Next Article

McDonald’s sauce gun trivia

At what point does quirky hipster knowledge become so obscure its essentially useless?
Comments
3

Worrying that his Labor and Developer cash and insider endorsements won't do the trick to get him elected Mayor over classy smart opponent and fellow Democrat, Barbara Bry., Todd Gloria surrogates today put out a 14x9-inch propaganda placard that wouldn't even fit in the mail slot. A ridiculous stretch, one side linked mild-mannered Democrat Bry with Donald Trump and paired outrageous Trump tweets with sober Bry votes, under a banner proclaiming "Make San Diego Great Again!" The other side showed companion lawn signs, one for Bry and one for Trump/pence from 2016. It was paid for by "Neighbors for Housing Solutions Supporting Todd Gloria for San Diego Mayor," San Diego Municipal Employees, Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters and LGBT Caucus Leadership Fund.

Oct. 7, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Oct. 12, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Oct. 12, 2020

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close