4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Will Covid-19 turn San Diego’s water plan into Toilet to Grave?

UC Riverside professor warns more research needed on drinkable sewage

Haizhou Liu of UC Riverside's department of chemical and environmental engineering
Haizhou Liu of UC Riverside's department of chemical and environmental engineering

Already under siege by cost overruns and litigious contractors, San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer's $1.4 billion plan to turn the city's sewage into drinkable water faces new doubts and questions of increased costs brought on by the global coronavirus pandemic

"Regulatory guidelines for virus removal in potable reuse systems need additional review for possible more stringent requirements in the event of a coronavirus outbreak," says an April 2 editorial in the journal Environmental Science and Water Technology, co-authored by Haizhou Liu of UC Riverside's department of chemical and environmental engineering.

Co-author Vincenzo Naddeo of the University of Salerno's sanitary environmental engineering division, department of civil engineering

"For example, the state of California currently requires a 12-log removal of viruses during the entire indirect potable treatment train."

But that may not be enough in the face of pandemic onslaughts by newly evolved viruses, say Liu and co-author Vincenzo Naddeo of the University of Salerno's sanitary environmental engineering division, department of civil engineering.

"Additional log-removal credit may be needed to protect public water systems in light of a virus outbreak," per the paper. "Preferential requirements for different viruses may be needed."

"Another important research need is a better understanding of the efficacy of emerging disinfection technologies for coronavirus inactivation, especially treatment steps that are integrated into potable water reuse."

Yet one more potentially expensive challenge in the age of Covid-19, according to Lieu and Naddeo, is to " develop new or upgrade existing water and wastewater treatment infrastructure for hot-spots that possibly receive coronavirus from sources including hospitals, community clinics and nursing homes."

Long controversial, the mayor's toilet-to-tap sewage reuse plan swept through city council after sponsors agreed to bar non-union contractors from bidding on much of the job, gaining the backing of council Democrats.

The local Associated General Contractors chapter subsequently sued, arguing that special state legislation to prevent non-union contractors from working on state-financed portions of the project was illegal.

Authored by Assembly Democrat Todd Gloria, a current candidate for mayor, and Toni Atkins, state senate pro-tem president, the fate of the bill is before a superior court judge, whose ruling is widely expected to undergo appeal regardless of the decision.

The legal wrangling is likely to add to the project's timeline and cost, which threatens to go sky-high in the face of new treatment requirements brought on by the Covid-19 crisis, which itself is spawning more varieties of disease with which to contend, Liu and Naddeo note.

"As a preventative measure against the coronavirus outbreak, the public is significantly increasing the use of bactericides, virucides, and disinfectants to prevent a possible infection and is limiting travel and activities

"This behavior affects our lifestyle and the economy, but from an environmental point of view it will increase the environmental presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

T. E. Hulme: an influence on Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot and Robert Frost

Six poems from the first Modernist poet
Next Article

San Diego Loyal fans – non-stop chants, non-stop drumming

I don’t have any reason to hate Orange County supporters
Haizhou Liu of UC Riverside's department of chemical and environmental engineering
Haizhou Liu of UC Riverside's department of chemical and environmental engineering

Already under siege by cost overruns and litigious contractors, San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer's $1.4 billion plan to turn the city's sewage into drinkable water faces new doubts and questions of increased costs brought on by the global coronavirus pandemic

"Regulatory guidelines for virus removal in potable reuse systems need additional review for possible more stringent requirements in the event of a coronavirus outbreak," says an April 2 editorial in the journal Environmental Science and Water Technology, co-authored by Haizhou Liu of UC Riverside's department of chemical and environmental engineering.

Co-author Vincenzo Naddeo of the University of Salerno's sanitary environmental engineering division, department of civil engineering

"For example, the state of California currently requires a 12-log removal of viruses during the entire indirect potable treatment train."

But that may not be enough in the face of pandemic onslaughts by newly evolved viruses, say Liu and co-author Vincenzo Naddeo of the University of Salerno's sanitary environmental engineering division, department of civil engineering.

"Additional log-removal credit may be needed to protect public water systems in light of a virus outbreak," per the paper. "Preferential requirements for different viruses may be needed."

"Another important research need is a better understanding of the efficacy of emerging disinfection technologies for coronavirus inactivation, especially treatment steps that are integrated into potable water reuse."

Yet one more potentially expensive challenge in the age of Covid-19, according to Lieu and Naddeo, is to " develop new or upgrade existing water and wastewater treatment infrastructure for hot-spots that possibly receive coronavirus from sources including hospitals, community clinics and nursing homes."

Long controversial, the mayor's toilet-to-tap sewage reuse plan swept through city council after sponsors agreed to bar non-union contractors from bidding on much of the job, gaining the backing of council Democrats.

The local Associated General Contractors chapter subsequently sued, arguing that special state legislation to prevent non-union contractors from working on state-financed portions of the project was illegal.

Authored by Assembly Democrat Todd Gloria, a current candidate for mayor, and Toni Atkins, state senate pro-tem president, the fate of the bill is before a superior court judge, whose ruling is widely expected to undergo appeal regardless of the decision.

The legal wrangling is likely to add to the project's timeline and cost, which threatens to go sky-high in the face of new treatment requirements brought on by the Covid-19 crisis, which itself is spawning more varieties of disease with which to contend, Liu and Naddeo note.

"As a preventative measure against the coronavirus outbreak, the public is significantly increasing the use of bactericides, virucides, and disinfectants to prevent a possible infection and is limiting travel and activities

"This behavior affects our lifestyle and the economy, but from an environmental point of view it will increase the environmental presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Stingaree's red-light rules, early Horton Plaza, Lomaland

New Town suffers downturn, San Diego's Civil War vets, merchant killed in Mission Valley
Next Article

The memories floating in Judith Moore's mind

The small town, solitary holidays, the dad reading Babar, summers in Washington state, the gay uncle, granny's farm
Comments
6

Anyone ever search the definition to the surname of "Liu" ??? meaning of: "kill, destroy"
This rather is to consist with the current world conditions, add the country where it is said to have begun. What would it take, more than endor$ement & bribery --- for such a name, related to such a trouble-base of origin, to succeed?~

May 1, 2020

Huh?

May 2, 2020

What is the cost of a perfectly sanitary waste water system and what other things would we have to give up to “make it so”?

NASA has and is spending zillions trying to develop something close for Space use and you can be sure it’s cost is astronomical, no pun intended.

As for me and I bet for most of us trying to live in SoCal, the majority of these focused studies are just another attempt to shift our limited financial resources to projects that increase the cost of making changes to the status quo.

A great example is the conversion of sea water to drinking, a wonder idea that is costing plenty because a small group is demanding perfection instead of allowing SD to provide lots of additional portable water for our current and future growth!

Suggestion: I we are going to spend money, let's spend money studying how to re-hydrate the Salton Sea and put in a high speed rail into SD, which would ease growth pressures in SD and make SoCal a World Class futuristic city!

Potable water is the new Oil, especially in $D.

May 3, 2020

"re-hydrate the Salton Sea " Easily done- open a channel to the Gulf of Mexico. Happiness for both countries.

May 3, 2020

I've seen a doc where they theorize that and how difficult it would be plus cost. Still an amazing idea that would not only bring water to that dying part of the southwest but housing and jobs also. Let's do it, where do I sign?

May 4, 2020

Trouble with over-application of happiness is a severely higher birth rates from them. We all know what I be talking about. So YOU want to add on to be one of the taxpayers to pay for those births, and later welfare, and retirements. MANY will come. As they work for less than U.S. You likely are a homeowner, so that further proves that you know what I talk about.

May 4, 2020

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close