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There are so many La Mesas

La Mesa Blvd., Collier Park, Normal Ave., MacArthur Park, secret stairways, Windsor Hills, Old Highway 80

La Mesa Boulevard. On the southwest comer of Normal and the Boulevard, there used to be a 7-Eleven, where at age 12 I got busted shoplifting a pack of Marlboros. The proprietor called my dad. - Image by Sandy Huffaker, Jr.
La Mesa Boulevard. On the southwest comer of Normal and the Boulevard, there used to be a 7-Eleven, where at age 12 I got busted shoplifting a pack of Marlboros. The proprietor called my dad.
  • They named Mt. Helix after a snail

  • Frank Arredondo has seen them, romping down his La Mesa street as if they owned it: coyotes. “I sit out on the front porch, and I smoke and drink coffee. Usually it’s early, before sunup.” Arredondo, my next-door neighbor, wears reading glasses perched out near the tip of his nose. He has dark, trimmed hair and olive-ish skin. We sit out in the evening chill in wood chairs on my front porch.
  • By Dave Good, Oct. 9, 2019
Over on Harvard Avenue, one homeowner looks to have attempted to transform his or her home into a small-scale medieval castle.
  • Welcome to the village — now calm down!

  • For many La Mesa residents (and visitors) accustomed to driving east along La Mesa Boulevard from University Avenue into the “village” area, it is unclear why ongoing construction eliminated the well-used right-turn lane at the intersection of La Mesa Boulevard and Acacia Avenue. The now-eliminated turn lane allowed drivers to turn right onto Acacia Avenue, bypassing the two-and-a-half-block business area just prior to Spring Street. Drivers could, without delaying or impeding those desiring to continue on La Mesa Boulevard.
  • By Jay Anderson, June 29, 2015
Do not follow the arrow.
  • 100 years later — the plan for Collier Park

  • By 9:30 a.m. on February 25, Collier Park tennis-court nets were lowered for the pickleball games that are played Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings in La Mesa's oldest park. As players with paddles concentrated on a perforated ball, a woman wheeled a stroller through the parking lot.
  • By Liz Swain, Feb. 28, 2015
The drought hasn't stopped the flow from the spring
  • La Mesa's ugly corner

  • La Mesa resident Linda Johnson walks frequently through her hometown and is on the board of La Mesa Beautiful. The nonprofit organization "works collectively to preserve and increase the beauty" of the city, according to the website for the group that gives awards recognizing residential and business landscapes. During a recent walk, Johnson said she felt compelled to take pictures and file a code-compliance complaint about what she described as an "eyesore,"
  • By Liz Swain, Feb. 24, 2015
Decades of restaurants and nightclubs and now this on El Cajon Boulevard
  • La Mesa's Anything-but-Normal Avenue

  • My Normal is just off University Avenue, and extends from the Von's shopping center to die back parking lot of Helix High School. It's hard to see it from here, but we live in the shadow of the lofty heights of Mt. Helix. Nevertheless, we have been called "Ghetto Mesa," and worse, terms to which I take exception.
  • By Adam Gettinger-Brizuela, Sept. 27, 2007
  • La Mesa

  • Suppose we start from the trolley stop at Spring Street and La Mesa Boulevard. Rather than take the boulevard with its countless antiques shops, we go east on Allison, make a left on Pine, the greenest and homiest of the cross streets that take us to University Avenue. After crossing University, we’ll turn right and perhaps look down upon a game of Little League baseball or old-timers’ softball before we make a left on Memorial Drive, into MacArthur Park.
  • By Ken Kuhlken, Dec. 24, 2003
La Mesa
  • Discover the "secret" steps and stairways of La Mesa

  • Head for Windsor Hills to find what may be the county's most secret set of stairs. From the intersection of Windsor Drive and Canterbury Drive, you climb a total of 245 steps, interrupted by two cross streets, to reach the top of Summit Drive. Looking behind you, you may catch a glimpse of the sun sinking into a fog bank over Mission Bay.
  • By Jerry Schad, July 20, 2000
  • Where sweet peace and love abideth

  • During my childhood in the early’50s, Highway 80 cut through the heart of most every town and city along its route. A few years later, the interstates would turn those stretches of highway into business loops. I’m charmed by those business loops that once were highways to someplace. Along them, our towns and cities grew.
  • By Ken Kuhlken, Nov. 20, 1997
La Mesa Drug Co. - in business as long as I remember.
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La Mesa Boulevard. On the southwest comer of Normal and the Boulevard, there used to be a 7-Eleven, where at age 12 I got busted shoplifting a pack of Marlboros. The proprietor called my dad. - Image by Sandy Huffaker, Jr.
La Mesa Boulevard. On the southwest comer of Normal and the Boulevard, there used to be a 7-Eleven, where at age 12 I got busted shoplifting a pack of Marlboros. The proprietor called my dad.
  • They named Mt. Helix after a snail

  • Frank Arredondo has seen them, romping down his La Mesa street as if they owned it: coyotes. “I sit out on the front porch, and I smoke and drink coffee. Usually it’s early, before sunup.” Arredondo, my next-door neighbor, wears reading glasses perched out near the tip of his nose. He has dark, trimmed hair and olive-ish skin. We sit out in the evening chill in wood chairs on my front porch.
  • By Dave Good, Oct. 9, 2019
Over on Harvard Avenue, one homeowner looks to have attempted to transform his or her home into a small-scale medieval castle.
  • Welcome to the village — now calm down!

  • For many La Mesa residents (and visitors) accustomed to driving east along La Mesa Boulevard from University Avenue into the “village” area, it is unclear why ongoing construction eliminated the well-used right-turn lane at the intersection of La Mesa Boulevard and Acacia Avenue. The now-eliminated turn lane allowed drivers to turn right onto Acacia Avenue, bypassing the two-and-a-half-block business area just prior to Spring Street. Drivers could, without delaying or impeding those desiring to continue on La Mesa Boulevard.
  • By Jay Anderson, June 29, 2015
Do not follow the arrow.
  • 100 years later — the plan for Collier Park

  • By 9:30 a.m. on February 25, Collier Park tennis-court nets were lowered for the pickleball games that are played Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings in La Mesa's oldest park. As players with paddles concentrated on a perforated ball, a woman wheeled a stroller through the parking lot.
  • By Liz Swain, Feb. 28, 2015
The drought hasn't stopped the flow from the spring
  • La Mesa's ugly corner

  • La Mesa resident Linda Johnson walks frequently through her hometown and is on the board of La Mesa Beautiful. The nonprofit organization "works collectively to preserve and increase the beauty" of the city, according to the website for the group that gives awards recognizing residential and business landscapes. During a recent walk, Johnson said she felt compelled to take pictures and file a code-compliance complaint about what she described as an "eyesore,"
  • By Liz Swain, Feb. 24, 2015
Decades of restaurants and nightclubs and now this on El Cajon Boulevard
  • La Mesa's Anything-but-Normal Avenue

  • My Normal is just off University Avenue, and extends from the Von's shopping center to die back parking lot of Helix High School. It's hard to see it from here, but we live in the shadow of the lofty heights of Mt. Helix. Nevertheless, we have been called "Ghetto Mesa," and worse, terms to which I take exception.
  • By Adam Gettinger-Brizuela, Sept. 27, 2007
  • La Mesa

  • Suppose we start from the trolley stop at Spring Street and La Mesa Boulevard. Rather than take the boulevard with its countless antiques shops, we go east on Allison, make a left on Pine, the greenest and homiest of the cross streets that take us to University Avenue. After crossing University, we’ll turn right and perhaps look down upon a game of Little League baseball or old-timers’ softball before we make a left on Memorial Drive, into MacArthur Park.
  • By Ken Kuhlken, Dec. 24, 2003
La Mesa
  • Discover the "secret" steps and stairways of La Mesa

  • Head for Windsor Hills to find what may be the county's most secret set of stairs. From the intersection of Windsor Drive and Canterbury Drive, you climb a total of 245 steps, interrupted by two cross streets, to reach the top of Summit Drive. Looking behind you, you may catch a glimpse of the sun sinking into a fog bank over Mission Bay.
  • By Jerry Schad, July 20, 2000
  • Where sweet peace and love abideth

  • During my childhood in the early’50s, Highway 80 cut through the heart of most every town and city along its route. A few years later, the interstates would turn those stretches of highway into business loops. I’m charmed by those business loops that once were highways to someplace. Along them, our towns and cities grew.
  • By Ken Kuhlken, Nov. 20, 1997
La Mesa Drug Co. - in business as long as I remember.
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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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