Anchor ads are not supported on this page.

4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Lakesider shreds docs explaining new density regs

State wants affordable housing, rural feel be damned

Gordon Shackelford and other locals absorbing the state rules
Gordon Shackelford and other locals absorbing the state rules

An emergency meeting summoned by the Lakeside Community Planning Group last night filled up the room at the community center in a jiffy with several dozens residents. Two county employees came to present the latest draft of the new Zoning Ordinance and County Code Clean Up. Noah Alvey, a planner with the county, answered questions coming from a fired up audience.

Scott Alevy, board member with the planning group, mentioned, “This is the 31st cleanup since the ordinance was originally adopted 41 years ago. There are five categories of zoning ordinance amendments — a) definitions b) animal regulations c) development regulations d) general regulations, and e) County code amendments.”

Video:

Lakeside Planning Group meeting

Feb. 29, 2019

Feb. 29, 2019

The public meeting was set up to discuss the matter before the first public hearing at the county board of supervisors scheduled for next week. Alevy noted, “Some items that are of concern to us include placement of wireless communication equipment in right of ways without the need for a discretionary permit, and rounding up any acreage to the next integer.” Alevy added, “there are also concerns to changes allowing multi-family development on R-1 (single residential home zoning) lots, changes in setback requirements, state density calculations, requirements and bonuses, high capacity transit issues, accessory dwelling unit issues and several other items.”

Sponsored
Sponsored

During the previous meeting last September, the majority of participants voted to stimulate the construction of single-family homes throughout the rural areas versus multiplex and other types of high-density housing units. At the end of the meeting last night, one participant concluded: “We lost single-family units with this plan.” The resigned conclusion belonged to Janis Shackelford, voted citizen of the year in 2018 for her involvement with Lakeside. Shackelford and her husband, Gordon, pored over a stack of documents trying to make sense of the new changes.

A controversial concept in the update stated, “if a single lot has a fraction of a dwelling unit (0.5 and higher) then it can be rounded up to the nearest whole number in order to encourage housing production." Gordon Shackelford contested the claim, pointing out that the fraction conforms with the General Plan densities, while rounding up the numbers would go above the approved maximum.

“To put a dwelling there, you’d exceed the planned density and that’s a fundamental problem with this.”

Lakeside Planning Group voted unanimously to oppose changes.

Planning manager Alvey explained, “Overall, the intention is to capture what the General Plan intended and also tracking at the community basis, the overall number of housing units that were anticipated based on the General Plan.” At which Schakelford replied, “You just threw in a wild card. You’re not talking about the density of the lot or subdivision, but about the overall density of the community.” After intense back and forth that left the audience more confused about the subject, Land Use Planner Liberman clarified, “This will only apply to 8 to 10 thousands parcels throughout the county where this could actually take place, based on the size of the lot whether it would be a fraction of the lot or not.” Liberman said this reflects the county’s effort “to increase the production of housing.”

Local resident Jitka Perez brought a copy of the Lakeside Community Plan to read it out loud, then shred it to pieces, saying she based her choice to move to Lakeside on the stated goal to “foster and preserve a rural atmosphere and a sense of spaciousness.”

Perez concluded, “It is a nightmare to live knowing that these densities are gonna increase and we don’t have the facilities to handle the runoff because it is no fun pumping water off your property for six hours.”

Asked to clarify what data was used to determine the affordability factor for Lakeside in order to justify an afflux of new urban development, Liberman said the county used the standard formula from the US Department of Housing and Community development. “ If you’re paying more than 30% of your income on the housing, then that housing is not affordable,” said Liberman.

Another controversial issue targeted the new change regarding a “3 feet setback” for housing units instead of 5 feet. Planning group member Alevy mentioned the fire safety concerns, pointing out, “I think all of this is driven by the state and the state continues to be driven by a small circle of people in San Francisco where there’s a high density and 3 feet there may feel expansive. This is not something that is consistent with the nature of our communities.” Liberman said the new constructions would have to comply with the fire code for a specific area.

The board concluded the meeting with unanimous votes in favor of Alvey’s motion to oppose three major changes in the housing ordinance: “We feel that the rounding up, the setback number and the multi family units are inconsistent with the nature of our community and our plan.”

The Lakeside Planning Group has an advisory role with no voting power to influence the decision of the board of supervisors on any of these matters. After the meeting, one board member said off the record that this meeting was just a box checked by the county to claim they value the community input, but the decision is already made.

The San Diego County board of supervisors will have two public hearings about the new changes in the housing ordinance on February 27 and March 13 at 9:00 a.m at the county’s building.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

All the illegal ways San Diegans save street parking

Traffic cones in Kensington, North Park, Mountain View, City Heights
Next Article

All the illegal ways San Diegans save street parking

Traffic cones in Kensington, North Park, Mountain View, City Heights
Gordon Shackelford and other locals absorbing the state rules
Gordon Shackelford and other locals absorbing the state rules

An emergency meeting summoned by the Lakeside Community Planning Group last night filled up the room at the community center in a jiffy with several dozens residents. Two county employees came to present the latest draft of the new Zoning Ordinance and County Code Clean Up. Noah Alvey, a planner with the county, answered questions coming from a fired up audience.

Scott Alevy, board member with the planning group, mentioned, “This is the 31st cleanup since the ordinance was originally adopted 41 years ago. There are five categories of zoning ordinance amendments — a) definitions b) animal regulations c) development regulations d) general regulations, and e) County code amendments.”

Video:

Lakeside Planning Group meeting

Feb. 29, 2019

Feb. 29, 2019

The public meeting was set up to discuss the matter before the first public hearing at the county board of supervisors scheduled for next week. Alevy noted, “Some items that are of concern to us include placement of wireless communication equipment in right of ways without the need for a discretionary permit, and rounding up any acreage to the next integer.” Alevy added, “there are also concerns to changes allowing multi-family development on R-1 (single residential home zoning) lots, changes in setback requirements, state density calculations, requirements and bonuses, high capacity transit issues, accessory dwelling unit issues and several other items.”

Sponsored
Sponsored

During the previous meeting last September, the majority of participants voted to stimulate the construction of single-family homes throughout the rural areas versus multiplex and other types of high-density housing units. At the end of the meeting last night, one participant concluded: “We lost single-family units with this plan.” The resigned conclusion belonged to Janis Shackelford, voted citizen of the year in 2018 for her involvement with Lakeside. Shackelford and her husband, Gordon, pored over a stack of documents trying to make sense of the new changes.

A controversial concept in the update stated, “if a single lot has a fraction of a dwelling unit (0.5 and higher) then it can be rounded up to the nearest whole number in order to encourage housing production." Gordon Shackelford contested the claim, pointing out that the fraction conforms with the General Plan densities, while rounding up the numbers would go above the approved maximum.

“To put a dwelling there, you’d exceed the planned density and that’s a fundamental problem with this.”

Lakeside Planning Group voted unanimously to oppose changes.

Planning manager Alvey explained, “Overall, the intention is to capture what the General Plan intended and also tracking at the community basis, the overall number of housing units that were anticipated based on the General Plan.” At which Schakelford replied, “You just threw in a wild card. You’re not talking about the density of the lot or subdivision, but about the overall density of the community.” After intense back and forth that left the audience more confused about the subject, Land Use Planner Liberman clarified, “This will only apply to 8 to 10 thousands parcels throughout the county where this could actually take place, based on the size of the lot whether it would be a fraction of the lot or not.” Liberman said this reflects the county’s effort “to increase the production of housing.”

Local resident Jitka Perez brought a copy of the Lakeside Community Plan to read it out loud, then shred it to pieces, saying she based her choice to move to Lakeside on the stated goal to “foster and preserve a rural atmosphere and a sense of spaciousness.”

Perez concluded, “It is a nightmare to live knowing that these densities are gonna increase and we don’t have the facilities to handle the runoff because it is no fun pumping water off your property for six hours.”

Asked to clarify what data was used to determine the affordability factor for Lakeside in order to justify an afflux of new urban development, Liberman said the county used the standard formula from the US Department of Housing and Community development. “ If you’re paying more than 30% of your income on the housing, then that housing is not affordable,” said Liberman.

Another controversial issue targeted the new change regarding a “3 feet setback” for housing units instead of 5 feet. Planning group member Alevy mentioned the fire safety concerns, pointing out, “I think all of this is driven by the state and the state continues to be driven by a small circle of people in San Francisco where there’s a high density and 3 feet there may feel expansive. This is not something that is consistent with the nature of our communities.” Liberman said the new constructions would have to comply with the fire code for a specific area.

The board concluded the meeting with unanimous votes in favor of Alvey’s motion to oppose three major changes in the housing ordinance: “We feel that the rounding up, the setback number and the multi family units are inconsistent with the nature of our community and our plan.”

The Lakeside Planning Group has an advisory role with no voting power to influence the decision of the board of supervisors on any of these matters. After the meeting, one board member said off the record that this meeting was just a box checked by the county to claim they value the community input, but the decision is already made.

The San Diego County board of supervisors will have two public hearings about the new changes in the housing ordinance on February 27 and March 13 at 9:00 a.m at the county’s building.

Comments
Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Terry Virts: How to Astronaut, 45 Years on the U.S.- Mexico Border, Santee Street Fair & Craft Beer Festival

Events May 23-May 25, 2024
Next Article

Bluefin are biting in the dark – ‘Social Fishtancing’ during covid

Water temperature helps determine halibut gender
Comments
Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox Movies@Home — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close

Anchor ads are not supported on this page.