Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

San Diego scooter scene calms down

"A lot were stolen”

From Scoot Safe video
From Scoot Safe video

On August 2, Steve Taylor direct messaged me a link to a YouTube video titled Scoot Safe – Emergency Physicians’ Tips for Electronic Scooter Riders.

“Dang, they gotta commercial for kids,” he said. “Notice the scooter in the commercial [resembles] a Lime-E scooter.”

Noellia: "They don’t line them up here on our sidewalks anymore.”

The one minute cartoon commercial, posted by The American College of Emergency Physicians, is a public health and safety campaign to push scooter riders to ride safely.

“…. Emergency physicians are seeing an increasing number of scooter-related accidents and injuries,” it says underneath the video. “The number one thing you can do to avoid serious harm is to wear a helmet.”

“But …. I thought kids were not allowed to use these motorized scooters,” Taylor said regarding the “kiddie nature” of the PSA.

45th and University. On December 27, a seven-year-old boy riding a motorized scooter near here was struck by a car.

Taylor is a 58-year-old cyclist that treks from La Mesa to work between Hillcrest and downtown; in 2018 he messaged me when he noticed share bikes or motorized scooters being abused on his eight-to-nine-mile ride to work. As of late, his messages come less often.

“I rarely see any scooters riding in from La Mesa,” he said, “not until I get here into Hillcrest.”

At times, Taylor takes the University Avenue route through City Heights.

Last October, a nine-year-old girl broke her leg two blocks south of University Avenue in City Heights, when she and her 16-year-old sister fell off a dockless electric scooter — according to local news outlets. The sisters were reportedly riding the scooter in tandem, then the scooter crashed into a tree on Dwight Street by 42nd Street.

Uber scooters. I asked about Scoot Scoop, the “free scooter removal service” that is getting sued by the Bird and Lime companies.

On August 3, I found Nancy selling at a yard sale by the Dwight Street accident scene. “Around here, it’s better now,” she said, “there is less scooters around and none available at times. The kids used it to play around and not to commute — so it’s better now that they have to walk and get some exercise.”

I crossed the street to speak with another neighbor having a yard sale. “That dress is $5,” she said to a customer that double-parked by us.

“How is the motorized scooter scene here?” I asked.

“The kids getting into accidents are less frequent,” she said. “For me, the scooters are better for our community because it’s practical to travel and go places, and in doing so, we don’t lose our [vehicle] parking spots here.”

After yard sale hopping, I drove to the plaza on University Avenue and 45th Street. On December 27, a seven-year-old boy riding a motorized scooter near here was struck by a car — according to NBC 7 San Diego.

I spoke to Jason; he was manning one of the stores in the plaza.

“I haven’t really seen that many scooters here,” he said. “Which is good because it’s dangerous for kids to ride. Those things go like 15 miles per hour and with traffic, when you come to a stop, you have to start braking far back — children don’t know that.”

In the last year, I saw two scooter accident aftermaths with EMTs and police on the scene, by University Avenue; one crash was a block away from Noelia’s Market on the corner of University and 37th Street.

“We don’t have the problems like last year,” said Noelia on August 3. “I heard that they put some new rules on the scooter companies.”

In June, new rules went into effect for dockless bike and scooter companies that park their share-rides within San Diego. The city council passed a law that limits speeds within designated areas, establishes a permitting process for operators, and requires all devices to scan a valid driver’s license before they can be ridden.

In November, Noellia was victimized by teenage scooter-riding bullies that would hit her piñatas as they scooted by, and make them fall; one teen even stopped and lit a piñata on fire.

“It’s a lot better now,” she said, “they (the teenagers) don’t cause problems anymore and the [scooter chargers] don’t line them up here on our [Cherokee Point] sidewalks anymore.”

I asked some of those living here and business owners/managers around here if they called Scoot Scoop, the San Diego-based “free scooter removal service” that is getting sued by the Bird and Lime companies; most said “no” while one said “no comment.”

Jason attributes the lack of motorized scooters available in City Heights to hackers.

“In this area, a lot were stolen,” he said, “I’ve witnessed people breaking them up so they (the scooter companies) took them out of this area …. people find ways where they don’t have to pay for it.”

“What do you mean?” I asked. “So they hacked them?”

“Exactly, I’ve seen it happen,” Jason responded. “They literally take the scooters apart. You would think they could have better jobs if they put that [ingenuity] to work.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

What opera is closest to California redwoods?

Tough competing with the English and Austrians
From Scoot Safe video
From Scoot Safe video

On August 2, Steve Taylor direct messaged me a link to a YouTube video titled Scoot Safe – Emergency Physicians’ Tips for Electronic Scooter Riders.

“Dang, they gotta commercial for kids,” he said. “Notice the scooter in the commercial [resembles] a Lime-E scooter.”

Noellia: "They don’t line them up here on our sidewalks anymore.”

The one minute cartoon commercial, posted by The American College of Emergency Physicians, is a public health and safety campaign to push scooter riders to ride safely.

“…. Emergency physicians are seeing an increasing number of scooter-related accidents and injuries,” it says underneath the video. “The number one thing you can do to avoid serious harm is to wear a helmet.”

“But …. I thought kids were not allowed to use these motorized scooters,” Taylor said regarding the “kiddie nature” of the PSA.

45th and University. On December 27, a seven-year-old boy riding a motorized scooter near here was struck by a car.

Taylor is a 58-year-old cyclist that treks from La Mesa to work between Hillcrest and downtown; in 2018 he messaged me when he noticed share bikes or motorized scooters being abused on his eight-to-nine-mile ride to work. As of late, his messages come less often.

“I rarely see any scooters riding in from La Mesa,” he said, “not until I get here into Hillcrest.”

At times, Taylor takes the University Avenue route through City Heights.

Last October, a nine-year-old girl broke her leg two blocks south of University Avenue in City Heights, when she and her 16-year-old sister fell off a dockless electric scooter — according to local news outlets. The sisters were reportedly riding the scooter in tandem, then the scooter crashed into a tree on Dwight Street by 42nd Street.

Uber scooters. I asked about Scoot Scoop, the “free scooter removal service” that is getting sued by the Bird and Lime companies.

On August 3, I found Nancy selling at a yard sale by the Dwight Street accident scene. “Around here, it’s better now,” she said, “there is less scooters around and none available at times. The kids used it to play around and not to commute — so it’s better now that they have to walk and get some exercise.”

I crossed the street to speak with another neighbor having a yard sale. “That dress is $5,” she said to a customer that double-parked by us.

“How is the motorized scooter scene here?” I asked.

“The kids getting into accidents are less frequent,” she said. “For me, the scooters are better for our community because it’s practical to travel and go places, and in doing so, we don’t lose our [vehicle] parking spots here.”

After yard sale hopping, I drove to the plaza on University Avenue and 45th Street. On December 27, a seven-year-old boy riding a motorized scooter near here was struck by a car — according to NBC 7 San Diego.

I spoke to Jason; he was manning one of the stores in the plaza.

“I haven’t really seen that many scooters here,” he said. “Which is good because it’s dangerous for kids to ride. Those things go like 15 miles per hour and with traffic, when you come to a stop, you have to start braking far back — children don’t know that.”

In the last year, I saw two scooter accident aftermaths with EMTs and police on the scene, by University Avenue; one crash was a block away from Noelia’s Market on the corner of University and 37th Street.

“We don’t have the problems like last year,” said Noelia on August 3. “I heard that they put some new rules on the scooter companies.”

In June, new rules went into effect for dockless bike and scooter companies that park their share-rides within San Diego. The city council passed a law that limits speeds within designated areas, establishes a permitting process for operators, and requires all devices to scan a valid driver’s license before they can be ridden.

In November, Noellia was victimized by teenage scooter-riding bullies that would hit her piñatas as they scooted by, and make them fall; one teen even stopped and lit a piñata on fire.

“It’s a lot better now,” she said, “they (the teenagers) don’t cause problems anymore and the [scooter chargers] don’t line them up here on our [Cherokee Point] sidewalks anymore.”

I asked some of those living here and business owners/managers around here if they called Scoot Scoop, the San Diego-based “free scooter removal service” that is getting sued by the Bird and Lime companies; most said “no” while one said “no comment.”

Jason attributes the lack of motorized scooters available in City Heights to hackers.

“In this area, a lot were stolen,” he said, “I’ve witnessed people breaking them up so they (the scooter companies) took them out of this area …. people find ways where they don’t have to pay for it.”

“What do you mean?” I asked. “So they hacked them?”

“Exactly, I’ve seen it happen,” Jason responded. “They literally take the scooters apart. You would think they could have better jobs if they put that [ingenuity] to work.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

What opera is closest to California redwoods?

Tough competing with the English and Austrians
Next Article

Imperial Beach, town without pretense

Sleeping ban. sandcastle stomping, immigrant shelter, breakwater, Brian Bilbray
Comments
3

Whoever thought that these scooters were a good idea must have money invested in the medical industry.

Aug. 11, 2019

or officials got some hefty campaign contributions to allow them in the first place

Aug. 12, 2019

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close