Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

What makes the border fence work

No escape field, see-through, razor wire

Climbers on secondary fence.
Climbers on secondary fence.

“Assault a U.S. law enforcement officer – expect to be held accountable,” said chief border patrol agent Rodney Scott in a press release November 3.

Old primary fence

On October 31 a federal jury in San Diego found Carlos Miranda-Alonso, a Mexican citizen, guilty of felony assault on a federal officer.

Primary fence on left, secondary fence on right

On May 10 he crossed the border illegally by crawling under the international boundary fence. He made his way north through the Tijuana River Estuary and came out on a walking path near the nature reserve’s visitor center in Imperial Beach.

Migrant having climbed over the fence

A border patrol agent caught him and tried to arrest him. Miranda-Alonso swung at the agent and ran. He continued to swing at the agent as he was pursued and at one point picked up a section of 4x4 wooden fence post to swing at him.

When the agent drew his firearm Miranda-Alonso dropped the post and was arrested shortly after. No shots were fired.

Though 72 assaults against border patrol agents were documented in the San Diego sector in 2017, the job was even more dangerous in the past. In 2008 there were 377 assaults against agents.

Between the years of 2005 to 2009 the yearly assault average was 272. It dropped to 100 between 2010 and 2014 then to 65 between 2015 and 2017.

Customs and border protection statistics show numbers of apprehensions and assaults rise and fall together. 2008 was also a recent peak in apprehensions, 162,390 in the San Diego sector.

From 2005 to 2009 the yearly apprehension average was 140,516. It dropped to 39,376 between 2010 and 2014 then to 28,089 between 2015-2017.

The all-time peak for apprehensions was over 628,000 in 1986.

So what changed between 1986 and 2008, and then between 2008 and the present? Among complex factors, the introduction of the double border fence in San Diego in the 1990s seems a defining factor.

According to a 2017 U.S. Government Accountability Office report, border patrol officials believe modern pedestrian fencing reduces assaults on agents because it reduces the ability of illegal entrants to stage mass crossings.

Agents say illegal entrants are more likely to fight when they have a chance to escape, such as near a large nature preserve, or at a section of the border that has no fence.

However, fences that cannot be seen through, such as San Diego’s original primary border fence, create a situation that leaves agents close to the wall ignorant of what is happening on the other side and vulnerable to attacks with projectiles thrown from the other side.

Rocks are the most common projectile used, but there was a time when Molotov cocktails and other projectiles got so bad agents were restricted from patrolling between the primary and secondary fences.

On December 30, 2017 someone hurled a “dodgeball sized rock” over the fence at a border patrol agent riding an ATV along the fence in San Ysidro. The rock hit him in the chest and knocked him to the ground. He survived with serious chest injuries.

The current secondary fence in San Diego is see-through and this summer construction began on replacing the original primary fence with a new see-through fence.

The new fence will have an anti-climbing plate at the top. A border patrol spokesman says a big factor in the reduction of assaults over the last several years was the addition of a different anti-climbing mechanism to the top of the secondary fence in 2009 – razor wire.

Images of Central American migrants scaling the U.S./Mexico border fence between Imperial Beach and Tijuana Beach Tuesday (November 13) shows the limitations of a fence without an anti-climbing feature at the top.

127,938 Mexican citizens were apprehended crossing the southwestern border illegally in 2017, far more than any other country. But they are not the majority of illegal entrants. Apprehended citizens from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador together numbered 162,891.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Moved to tears by Dave’s Hot Chicken

Nashville hot chicken ranges from no spice, to hot, to the indemnified “reaper”
Climbers on secondary fence.
Climbers on secondary fence.

“Assault a U.S. law enforcement officer – expect to be held accountable,” said chief border patrol agent Rodney Scott in a press release November 3.

Old primary fence

On October 31 a federal jury in San Diego found Carlos Miranda-Alonso, a Mexican citizen, guilty of felony assault on a federal officer.

Primary fence on left, secondary fence on right

On May 10 he crossed the border illegally by crawling under the international boundary fence. He made his way north through the Tijuana River Estuary and came out on a walking path near the nature reserve’s visitor center in Imperial Beach.

Migrant having climbed over the fence

A border patrol agent caught him and tried to arrest him. Miranda-Alonso swung at the agent and ran. He continued to swing at the agent as he was pursued and at one point picked up a section of 4x4 wooden fence post to swing at him.

When the agent drew his firearm Miranda-Alonso dropped the post and was arrested shortly after. No shots were fired.

Though 72 assaults against border patrol agents were documented in the San Diego sector in 2017, the job was even more dangerous in the past. In 2008 there were 377 assaults against agents.

Between the years of 2005 to 2009 the yearly assault average was 272. It dropped to 100 between 2010 and 2014 then to 65 between 2015 and 2017.

Customs and border protection statistics show numbers of apprehensions and assaults rise and fall together. 2008 was also a recent peak in apprehensions, 162,390 in the San Diego sector.

From 2005 to 2009 the yearly apprehension average was 140,516. It dropped to 39,376 between 2010 and 2014 then to 28,089 between 2015-2017.

The all-time peak for apprehensions was over 628,000 in 1986.

So what changed between 1986 and 2008, and then between 2008 and the present? Among complex factors, the introduction of the double border fence in San Diego in the 1990s seems a defining factor.

According to a 2017 U.S. Government Accountability Office report, border patrol officials believe modern pedestrian fencing reduces assaults on agents because it reduces the ability of illegal entrants to stage mass crossings.

Agents say illegal entrants are more likely to fight when they have a chance to escape, such as near a large nature preserve, or at a section of the border that has no fence.

However, fences that cannot be seen through, such as San Diego’s original primary border fence, create a situation that leaves agents close to the wall ignorant of what is happening on the other side and vulnerable to attacks with projectiles thrown from the other side.

Rocks are the most common projectile used, but there was a time when Molotov cocktails and other projectiles got so bad agents were restricted from patrolling between the primary and secondary fences.

On December 30, 2017 someone hurled a “dodgeball sized rock” over the fence at a border patrol agent riding an ATV along the fence in San Ysidro. The rock hit him in the chest and knocked him to the ground. He survived with serious chest injuries.

The current secondary fence in San Diego is see-through and this summer construction began on replacing the original primary fence with a new see-through fence.

The new fence will have an anti-climbing plate at the top. A border patrol spokesman says a big factor in the reduction of assaults over the last several years was the addition of a different anti-climbing mechanism to the top of the secondary fence in 2009 – razor wire.

Images of Central American migrants scaling the U.S./Mexico border fence between Imperial Beach and Tijuana Beach Tuesday (November 13) shows the limitations of a fence without an anti-climbing feature at the top.

127,938 Mexican citizens were apprehended crossing the southwestern border illegally in 2017, far more than any other country. But they are not the majority of illegal entrants. Apprehended citizens from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador together numbered 162,891.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Building paradise in San Diego

Mission Valley, Tijuana gardens, Otay Mesa, downtown skyscrapers, One Paseo, Rancho Santa Fe mansion
Next Article

Vista City Attorney and James Buss donate to Trump campaign

Chula Vista's Jill Galvez barred from voting on fire trucks
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close