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County unemployment broke below 3 percent in April, coming in at 2.9 percent, down from a revised 3.2 percent in March.

The April rate was down from 3.9 percent a year ago, and down from the April unadjusted rate of 3.8 percent for the state and 3.7 percent for the nation

Professional and business services jobs reached a highest-ever total of 244,800, up 4,500 from March. Construction added 2000 jobs — higher than normal. Once again, tiny Bostonia near El Cajon had the highest rate in the county in April, 5.8 percent.

From April of last year, nonfarm jobs rose by 32,100, or 2.2 percent. Professional and business services jobs rose by a robust 6.1 percent over the year.

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Comments

Visduh May 18, 2018 @ 7:18 p.m.

While I know that unemployment is down and jobs are up, I'm still suspicious of these measures. After the economic crisis we went through, many able-bodied workers just dropped out of the labor force. How they manage without a job is a mystery except that we know about disability claims and working strictly for cash. How many of those who dropped out have come back very quietly? Until we can be sure of these measures they need to persist for several more months.

1

Don Bauder May 18, 2018 @ 9:13 p.m.

Visduh: We know a lot of people dropped out of the labor force, and it's quite possible many are working in the underground economy. Most importantly, in my judgment, middle class wages have barely gone up in four decades. That is a better measurement than unemployment statistics. Best, Don Bauder

1

AlexClarke May 20, 2018 @ 7:07 a.m.

The hotel, restaurant, retail and tourist industry rely on illegal workers and legal immigrant workers who are willing to work for poverty wages to bolster their bottom line. They also rely on welfare and housing subsidizes as well as the newest "affordable housing" programs to augment their profits. I wonder what would happen if employers did not have all these government and social programs to augment their low wage no/low benefit workers?

0

Don Bauder May 20, 2018 @ 10:42 a.m.

AlexClarke: Yes, and consider agriculture. There is already a labor shortage in the Central Valley, I understand. I don't know if crops are rotting in the fields yet, but I think it is only a matter of time.

Also, you have to consider the federal government subsidies to these people as corporate welfare. The companies' profits boom then the government, in effect, pays its wages. Best, Don Bauder

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dwbat May 20, 2018 @ 2:25 p.m.

From things I've read, the big agricultural companies have moved into automation for crop harvesting.

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Don Bauder May 21, 2018 @ 7:34 a.m.

dwbat: I will have to do more reading on that. Best, Don Bauder

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