Playboy offered $500 for posing topless and up to $1500 for posing in the nude.
  • Playboy offered $500 for posing topless and up to $1500 for posing in the nude.
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According to ESPN.com,the Chargers’ cheeerleaders of the late 1970s got double-crossed. Sidelined, a movie about the episode, was shown late last month at the Tribeca Film Festival. The gist of the film is that the Chargers cheerleaders, then called Chargettes, were recruited on the basis of sex appeal, then thrown under the bus when they posed for Playboy.

The Chargers fired the whole squad before the Playboy issue came out.

From ESPN

The cheerleaders were expected to display their sex appeal when they tried out for the job, according to the film. Indeed, they were told so by letter. Playboy visited a practice. Many of the cheerleaders were persuaded to pose nude, or close to it. Playboy offered $500 for posing topless and up to $1500 for posing in the nude.

Although the team had told young women they should show their sex at tryouts, the Chargers fired the whole squad before the Playboy issue came out.

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dwbat May 14, 2018 @ 10:21 a.m.

Sidelined is supposed to be aired on Lifetime channel.

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Don Bauder May 14, 2018 @ 6:53 p.m.

dwbat: Good info. Can you give us date and time? Best, Don Bader

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Don Bauder May 15, 2018 @ 11:02 a.m.

dwbat: Then you yourself are like a strip teaser! Best, Don Bauder

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dwbat May 15, 2018 @ 9:38 p.m.

If only I could make that much money! ;-)

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Don Bauder May 16, 2018 @ 1:27 p.m.

dwbat: If you really want to make money, be a lawyer for a stripper, rather than a stripper. Best, Don Bauder

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dwbat May 16, 2018 @ 4:43 p.m.

Or the guy who owns the strip joint.

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Don Bauder May 17, 2018 @ 12:37 p.m.

dwbat: Yeah, but he has to pay off cops, politicians, have lobbyists on the payroll. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh May 14, 2018 @ 1:20 p.m.

I doubt that anything has changed much. The teams may be less blatant about wanting sexy cheerleaders, but they get them anyway. That incident in 1978 was probably deemed newsworthy locally, but I don't recall it.

If you look at the cheerleaders in college, while some of the squads emphasize gymnastics and dance, others are booty shakers and not much more. In fact, a few years back, UCLA was being criticized for having the girls executing moves that were straight out of strip joints. All of cheerleading by attractive young women walks a fine line between too sexy and boring.

But one thing. Was the term "wholesome" yours, that of the headline writer,or that of the Chargers at the time? Wholesome just doesn't fit NFL cheerleading and never has.

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Don Bauder May 14, 2018 @ 6:58 p.m.

Visduh: Mea maxima culpa. Wholesome was my word in both the head and the copy. I have admitted that I watch pro football even though I rail against it. But I have never said I watch the cheerleaders. Any man who does so is likely to be charged with sexual harassment. Best, Don Bauder

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davebabb94 May 14, 2018 @ 8:07 p.m.

I remember listening to "Buckets of Money" Ray Lucia on the radio when his daughter came into the studio to ask him for money. She was a cheerleader with the Chargers. 2000 ish? And she had no money to fill up her empty tank so she had to walk to the studio to ask Dad for cash. Luckily the Chargers training facility and KOGO's studios were (are?) pretty close together near Aero Drive. And Ray, or his on-air buddy, said "pretty girl but not good with money". I remember thinking, wow if he can't get his daughter to follow his strategy, how can he teach me? Later, through the Chargers she met and married our hometown-pick-up-football-hero-while-on-injured-reserve Ryan Leaf. And even though Ray brought him on the radio, Ryan too appeared to be immune to the Lucia financial coaching charm.

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Visduh May 14, 2018 @ 8:22 p.m.

Poor old Ray. He don't get no respect. He had to endure his daughter marrying the flake sports hero of all time, Ryan Leaf. For a time Ray tried to excuse/justify Ryan's missteps, but he couldn't keep it up indefinitely. So the "happy" couple divorced, and Leaf spiraled down and down and ended up an imprisoned convict in Montana. What ever happened to Ray's daughter?

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Don Bauder May 15, 2018 @ 11:21 a.m.

Visduh: My last item on Ryan Leaf was May 5, 2016. He claimed he was clean. I know nothing about his ex-wife, Ray's daughter. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 15, 2018 @ 11:13 a.m.

davebabb94: Leaf is supposed to have made a comeback. He is supposedly clean. In fact, I think I posted something to that effect.

As to Ray, I have predicted that he will win his Supreme Court case. Just keep in mind that this would not mean he was necessarily innocent of what the SEC smacked him for. It would mean he is saying that the administrative law judge who initially nailed him was wrongly appointed. If Ray wins, the federal government will have to spend a bundle of money changing how administrative law judges are chosen throughout the government. If the whole system is rearranged, then perhaps Ray would then say that his "Buckets of Money" pitch was not misleading, as the SEC's ALJ, and then the commission itself, decided. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh May 16, 2018 @ 7:36 a.m.

If he wins this case, it is due to a technicality. The facts of his case aren't going to change. Although I didn't like to listen to him on AM radio, I'm not sure he severely wronged many or most of his clients and followers. Too many people who need to take charge of their nest eggs and plan for retirement don't do it, and end up poor when the paychecks stop coming in. Worse yet some cannot quit when their health and bodies just can't bear the burden of going out every day to work. Ray was encouraging people to think about the future, save some of their earnings consistently, and invest the funds intelligently. Without that, there would have been no provision for financial freedom in retirement. Getting the best possible returns on such investments would be wonderful, but most of us fall short of that. But getting a decent return is better than no savings or no return at all. I'm willing to cut him some slack, despite his misleading claims.

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dwbat May 16, 2018 @ 8:55 a.m.

I think planning for retirement should begin in one's 30s, and definitely before your 40s. Retirement sneaks up on you, before you know it.

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Don Bauder May 16, 2018 @ 1:39 p.m.

dwbfat: I agree. Begin planning early for retirement. I say that even though in two weeks I turn 82 years of age and I am not retired, or even semi-retired. I have a problem called work addiction. Best, Don Bauder

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dwbat May 21, 2018 @ 7:48 p.m.

"dwbfat"?? Hey, I watch my weight and girth!

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Don Bauder May 23, 2018 @ 7:28 a.m.

dwbat: In re the typo: Remember, I said I will soon be 82. My hands shake terribly. I can't eat soup without it spilling it everywhere. And, of course, I make many more typos. I try to correct them, but often fail. And your picture indicates that you are svelte. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 16, 2018 @ 1:33 p.m.

Visduh: If he wins, it won't change the fact that the commission claimed his "Buckets of Money" investment strategy was wrongly concocted and misleading. I'm not sure it was any more misleading than many other widely-hawked investment strategies. Best, Don Bauder

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davebabb94 May 16, 2018 @ 4:05 p.m.

I have to admit I struggled to understand how the three buckets of his strategy could work. Either you would rebalance the three inside of a tax-sheltered plan (like mutual funds in a 401k) but then how would you take advantage of the short-term bucket for life's needs? At least Ray & co were better than the smooth sounding purveyor of managed investment trusts Jacob Cooper who used to ply his trade on KOGO Saturday mornings. I wonder if he is still in jail for ripping off his Mormon elders?

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Don Bauder May 17, 2018 @ 12:44 p.m.

davebabb94: I don't know what has happened to Cooper, either. Maybe I will go back and take a look at him. Best, Don Bauder

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dwbat May 19, 2018 @ 11:22 a.m.

What about SD's Wilsey Asset Management, which has constantly running TV commercials, telling viewers to "trust us" with your investments? When someone I don't know tells me to trust them, I'm instantly suspicious.

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Don Bauder May 19, 2018 @ 1:32 p.m.

dwbat: I don't know about Wilsey. As Trump would say, "We'll see." Best, Don Bauder

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