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$100 for place to walk your dog? Not bad.

Animals vs. kids at Park and Washington

Sasha enjoys the lawn south of Alice Birney with her respectful owner.
Sasha enjoys the lawn south of Alice Birney with her respectful owner.

University Heights residents are divided on the highest, best use for the joint-use park that is the playground for Alice Birney Elementary School. Neighborhood dog lovers have been letting as many as 30 of their beasts play off-leash and the school principal and students’ parents are just plain grossed out.

“School staff told us that before the school day begins, they have been going out to pick up waste that owners left behind,” says Humane Society Officer Steve MacKinnon. “We’ve received complaints from parents, too.”

For the last month and a half, Humane Society officers have been monitoring Birney and about a dozen other parks where the conflicting uses are a problem. Birney’s playing field is in the northwest corner of the San Diego Unified School District’s spread that includes the historic school district building along Park Boulevard and then Normal Street, just north of Washington. Humane Society enforcement officers have been to the 9,500-square-yard field 19 times since mid-October, a spokesman said.

“We see the whole range,” MacKinnon said. “We’ve come by and found no dogs and come by and find 30 dogs.”

Caroline, a Birney school parent and a dog lover, says you can smell dog urine and feces when you come inside the gated field.

“The city has put up signs and the people disregard them. The Birney children have made dog bag dispensers and they've been torn down. Parents have tried to inform the mis-users and they've been aggressively confronted by angry defensive dog owners,” she said. “The obvious feces and urine problems occur and the PE coach cleans it up every morning, but many dogs dig holes and some children have fallen in them during PE and twisted their ankles.”

Parents sought help from the Humane Society, and they got it.

“We’ve been doing education at all the targeted parks,” MacKinnon says. “For example, officers carry maps of where dog parks are and they give them to people whose dogs were off-leash.”

In July, the Humane Society took over providing the city’s animal services, prompting a huge burst of growth. The agency already had contracts with a half dozen cities, five Native American reservations and the unincorporated areas of the county. Still, to cover San Diego, the agency nearly doubled in size. The $20 million contract was reluctantly approved – it was triggered by the county closure of its Animal Control Services. At first, MacKinnon says, city officials wanted them to hold back on enforcement and focus on cooperation and education.

But the education period is over. Now, MacKinnon says, dog owners whose dog is off-leash will receive citations that start with a $100 fine that increases with each subsequent bust.

About 50 school parents and dog owners attended a meeting of the University Heights Parks and Recreation Council December 5 to voice their concerns and look for solutions, according to Chris Mills, chairman of the University Heights Community Association. The solutions ran the gamut from banning dogs in violation of the joint use agreement between the city and the school district, to banning children by making the playground a dog park.

“It won’t be turned into a dog park,” a city official said flatly.

Despite the Humane Society telling people they would begin to enforce, a week after the December 5 meeting, dog owners continue to run their dogs after dark, when the kids are gone.

Tuesday evening, one of them said she’d met the Humane Society enforcer who was taking names - of both the people and the dogs - and handing out maps of regional dog parks. Which is why we’ll call her Maggie. Many of the dog parks close at dusk and quite a few - Nate’s Point in Balboa Park, Dusty Rhodes in OB, the dog park near Mesa College and the dog area at Morley Field, for example - are just a packed dirt surface after the city stopped watering them. Others aren’t fenced, making it easy to lose a dog. The ‘temporary’ dog park at Ward Canyon, four miles from Birney, continues to use the same wood chunks that send splinters into dogs’ feet.

And while there are great dog parks and beaches on days off when there’s time to pack up and drive to the dog beach and stay a while, that’s not how work nights go for Maggie. She gets up before dawn and works long days and comes home late. Since she lives nearby and knows many of the dog park regulars, she continues to come to the park.

“It’s people who don’t pick up after their dogs that have caused the problems,” Maggie says. “I get that nobody wants to see their child coming in contact with dog poop.”

The dog owners offered solutions: fence off the huge grassy area on the other side of the historic and current school administration buildings and put a dog park there. Create a specific area for dogs to relieve themselves. Set hours to let dogs come before kids show up for school or after dark, after kids are gone. The best solution wasn’t apparent at the first meeting.

MacKinnon notes there are signs posted at several spots in each park, including the entrances, that make clear dogs must be leashed at all times. A new batch of signs with the Humane Society enforcement phone numbers just went up.

Most of the dog owners at Birney like Maggie live in the immediate vicinity and walk over, similar to what happens at other joint-use playgrounds. Some people think the answer is to get a new dog park closer to home, Mills said. But the process is onerous and takes a more than a couple of years.

Councilmember Chris Ward’s office is working on a solution, according to staffer A. J. Estrada. In the meantime, they’re supporting enforcement efforts. Some dog owners, on hearing this, shrug. After all, $100 to be able to take your dog out to play in walking distance from home is a pretty good deal.

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Sasha enjoys the lawn south of Alice Birney with her respectful owner.
Sasha enjoys the lawn south of Alice Birney with her respectful owner.

University Heights residents are divided on the highest, best use for the joint-use park that is the playground for Alice Birney Elementary School. Neighborhood dog lovers have been letting as many as 30 of their beasts play off-leash and the school principal and students’ parents are just plain grossed out.

“School staff told us that before the school day begins, they have been going out to pick up waste that owners left behind,” says Humane Society Officer Steve MacKinnon. “We’ve received complaints from parents, too.”

For the last month and a half, Humane Society officers have been monitoring Birney and about a dozen other parks where the conflicting uses are a problem. Birney’s playing field is in the northwest corner of the San Diego Unified School District’s spread that includes the historic school district building along Park Boulevard and then Normal Street, just north of Washington. Humane Society enforcement officers have been to the 9,500-square-yard field 19 times since mid-October, a spokesman said.

“We see the whole range,” MacKinnon said. “We’ve come by and found no dogs and come by and find 30 dogs.”

Caroline, a Birney school parent and a dog lover, says you can smell dog urine and feces when you come inside the gated field.

“The city has put up signs and the people disregard them. The Birney children have made dog bag dispensers and they've been torn down. Parents have tried to inform the mis-users and they've been aggressively confronted by angry defensive dog owners,” she said. “The obvious feces and urine problems occur and the PE coach cleans it up every morning, but many dogs dig holes and some children have fallen in them during PE and twisted their ankles.”

Parents sought help from the Humane Society, and they got it.

“We’ve been doing education at all the targeted parks,” MacKinnon says. “For example, officers carry maps of where dog parks are and they give them to people whose dogs were off-leash.”

In July, the Humane Society took over providing the city’s animal services, prompting a huge burst of growth. The agency already had contracts with a half dozen cities, five Native American reservations and the unincorporated areas of the county. Still, to cover San Diego, the agency nearly doubled in size. The $20 million contract was reluctantly approved – it was triggered by the county closure of its Animal Control Services. At first, MacKinnon says, city officials wanted them to hold back on enforcement and focus on cooperation and education.

But the education period is over. Now, MacKinnon says, dog owners whose dog is off-leash will receive citations that start with a $100 fine that increases with each subsequent bust.

About 50 school parents and dog owners attended a meeting of the University Heights Parks and Recreation Council December 5 to voice their concerns and look for solutions, according to Chris Mills, chairman of the University Heights Community Association. The solutions ran the gamut from banning dogs in violation of the joint use agreement between the city and the school district, to banning children by making the playground a dog park.

“It won’t be turned into a dog park,” a city official said flatly.

Despite the Humane Society telling people they would begin to enforce, a week after the December 5 meeting, dog owners continue to run their dogs after dark, when the kids are gone.

Tuesday evening, one of them said she’d met the Humane Society enforcer who was taking names - of both the people and the dogs - and handing out maps of regional dog parks. Which is why we’ll call her Maggie. Many of the dog parks close at dusk and quite a few - Nate’s Point in Balboa Park, Dusty Rhodes in OB, the dog park near Mesa College and the dog area at Morley Field, for example - are just a packed dirt surface after the city stopped watering them. Others aren’t fenced, making it easy to lose a dog. The ‘temporary’ dog park at Ward Canyon, four miles from Birney, continues to use the same wood chunks that send splinters into dogs’ feet.

And while there are great dog parks and beaches on days off when there’s time to pack up and drive to the dog beach and stay a while, that’s not how work nights go for Maggie. She gets up before dawn and works long days and comes home late. Since she lives nearby and knows many of the dog park regulars, she continues to come to the park.

“It’s people who don’t pick up after their dogs that have caused the problems,” Maggie says. “I get that nobody wants to see their child coming in contact with dog poop.”

The dog owners offered solutions: fence off the huge grassy area on the other side of the historic and current school administration buildings and put a dog park there. Create a specific area for dogs to relieve themselves. Set hours to let dogs come before kids show up for school or after dark, after kids are gone. The best solution wasn’t apparent at the first meeting.

MacKinnon notes there are signs posted at several spots in each park, including the entrances, that make clear dogs must be leashed at all times. A new batch of signs with the Humane Society enforcement phone numbers just went up.

Most of the dog owners at Birney like Maggie live in the immediate vicinity and walk over, similar to what happens at other joint-use playgrounds. Some people think the answer is to get a new dog park closer to home, Mills said. But the process is onerous and takes a more than a couple of years.

Councilmember Chris Ward’s office is working on a solution, according to staffer A. J. Estrada. In the meantime, they’re supporting enforcement efforts. Some dog owners, on hearing this, shrug. After all, $100 to be able to take your dog out to play in walking distance from home is a pretty good deal.

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Comments
2

In your Dec issue of the reader there was a story about passing out tickets to those who don't pick up after their dog. Yahoo! Its about time! That's right Humane Society get those ticket books out, dust them off, and start writing on them and passing them out. Dog owners who think they don't have to pick up after there dog should be given a ticket. If you own a dog you know the law, if you don't know the law then you shouldn't have a dog. Come on people who likes stepping in dog poop? Not me, do you? The dog poop problem is so bad in my neighborhood that home owners have made there own sign and put them up. Here's the best sign I have seen. Don't feed the flies pick up after your dog! That was on a fence in a alley. So please dog owners pick up after your dog or get a ticket and pay a fine of 100.00.

Jan. 3, 2019

Your article's heading - Animals vs.Kids at Park and Washington - creates a false conflict, pitting animals against kids in the joint-use field park, when that is not the issue at all. Nor is the issue being able to pay a $100 ticket for the privilege of breaking the law. Dog owners who keep their dogs ON-LEASH are welcome at any time! Leashed dogs pee or poop where their owners can clean up after them. Leashed dogs don't dig holes in the turf field. Leashed dogs don't interrupt games by stealing balls and toys when kids/adults throw them. Leashed dogs don't body-slam kids when racing around the park, either from exuberance or chasing after a ball. Leashed dogs don't attack. Leashed dogs are supervised closely by their owner. There is NO EXCUSE for the blatant disregard of the posted signs which require that dogs be leashed when in the joint-use area. The example these people set for the students at Birney is a sad one - adults can spit in the face of any rule or law when they feel like it. It is a small example of a greater issue at hand in our country right now - if you can afford to pay the fine you can get away with anything! This is not what Birney's staff and parents want to teach their students - we are seeking to co-exist peacefully with the dog owners, which can be achieved if the dog owners will simply abide by the law. Keep the dog on a leash and walk further with them if exercise is what they need.

Jan. 13, 2019

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