4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

They want IB to look good from the bike path

Seventh Street neighbors cited for back yards

Kelly Leiker: "My husband has slowly been fixing up the yard for us to enjoy come summer."
Kelly Leiker: "My husband has slowly been fixing up the yard for us to enjoy come summer."

“They want the neighborhood to look pretty from the back too,” said Pete Suarez, “now that’s a crock.”

Jerry (right): “I feel bad for the gear heads that can’t wrench without constantly looking over their shoulders.”

Suarez bikes from south San Diego through Imperial Beach to get to Coronado. On April 28, I spotted him riding his turquoise Bianchi all-road bike, on the new bike trail behind the houses of 7th Street that leads to the Bayshore Bikeway/Silver Strand Bikeway.

“Even if their backyards looked like Sanford and Son, I wouldn’t get distracted,” he said, “but just maybe, the tourists that rent those goofy ofo bikes, might, and lose control if they see piles of junk.”

Pete Suarez: “Even if their backyards looked like Sanford and Son, I wouldn’t get distracted.”

On April 20, some IB residents that live on 7th Street received a letter from the city of Imperial Beach that said they had to clean up their backyards in 30 days, or be fined.

“We thought that there would never be anything behind our home since its a bird estuary,” said Kelly Leiker. “There was never a trail before a few months ago.”

Leiker received one of the “Notice of intent to enforce minimum standards for properties” letters from the city. Her mother’s owned the house on 7th Street since 1977, but since then, Leiker has taken over, and in the last year, she and her husband invested $130,000 to fix it up.

Residents will be “assessed a fine of not less than $100.00.”

“We have an infant and a preschooler that deserve our attention after work,” she said, “and my husband has slowly been fixing up the yard for us to enjoy come summer. I’m not sure if our yard is in compliance or not and we have yet to fix any questionable characteristics of our backyard.”

On the letter it reads in part “Please review the condition of the rear yard area of your property. If any of the conditions below are present, please correct the violations within 30 days of this notice.”

“Our yard isn’t a junkyard,” Leiker said, “not for the tourists, not for the visitors; but for ourselves and for our children.”

Leiker then sent me photos of their backyard. The two potential violations she’s concerned about are:

“Trash, debris, construction materials, etc. are prohibited from accumulating on the property" and

"Overgrown or dead vegetation on property, including sidewalks, curbs, gutters, and parkways is prohibited from accumulating on the property.”

They have a ladder lying by their fence; bags of soil, empty planters, and tools around their picnic table; and weeds growing by their blue shed. Leiker admitted, "There are stacks of pavers and a few construction type materials that we are using to fix up our yard.”

Jerry, a cyclist and mechanic, rides his Trek 5200 to Coronado. He parks his car and starts at the J Street Marina, passes the salt works on the frontage road by I-5, then crosses the new bike path behind Leiker’s house. “The rule of no parking and storage of vehicles in the backyard is f’ed-up,” he said, “I feel bad for the gear heads that can’t wrench without constantly looking over their shoulders.”

“Who judges what’s acceptable or not?” questioned Jerry.

Inspections of 7th Street backyards, between the 300-500 blocks, will be conducted on or after May 20, and if the property fails to meet minimum standards, the residents will be “assessed a fine of not less than $100.00.”

“So what does that mean,” Suarez said, “will they have to pay $100 per infraction …. I don’t think they (the city reps) can do that.”

Leiker’s not taking the letter lightly. She posted her sentiments on social media. “Shame on the city for giving us 30 days to finish a project,” she said. “The point is, 30 days isn’t much in the busy lives of working folks with young children, sick family, sports events. and social responsibilities …. whatever.”

Other neighbors chimed in and forewarned the 7th Street residents that their code compliance officers mean business.

Claudio is from Imperial Beach, but he and his family live over by Florence Street, less than a mile southeast from Leiker.

“We are up to $8,000 in fines over things we can’t afford to take care of,” said Claudio. “She (the code compliance officer) forced her way in our yard and took pictures. Even though our gate’s locked, she keeps coming back giving us more fines. They are fining us for overgrown vegetation that doesn’t exist anymore, rodents, sheds that have been on the property for 20 years, our fences and few other things. It’s like seven pages of citations.”

Leiker said that the city added a rod iron fence and plants to separate the new bike path from their backyards. “I’m not sure how long bougainvillea and the other plants they planted take to create enough cover for privacy,” she said, “but it will take longer than 30 days.”

“If they (the city) knew they were going to build a bike path for us [cyclists] a long time ago,” Suarez said, “why didn’t they warn the residents when the construction began.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

It’s hard for me to leave Imperial Beach

There were three dolphins behind us, and two on each side of us.
Next Article

Dead bodies pile up at Tijuana's Semefo

More than 270 corpses moved to Juarez neighborhood start to smell
Kelly Leiker: "My husband has slowly been fixing up the yard for us to enjoy come summer."
Kelly Leiker: "My husband has slowly been fixing up the yard for us to enjoy come summer."

“They want the neighborhood to look pretty from the back too,” said Pete Suarez, “now that’s a crock.”

Jerry (right): “I feel bad for the gear heads that can’t wrench without constantly looking over their shoulders.”

Suarez bikes from south San Diego through Imperial Beach to get to Coronado. On April 28, I spotted him riding his turquoise Bianchi all-road bike, on the new bike trail behind the houses of 7th Street that leads to the Bayshore Bikeway/Silver Strand Bikeway.

“Even if their backyards looked like Sanford and Son, I wouldn’t get distracted,” he said, “but just maybe, the tourists that rent those goofy ofo bikes, might, and lose control if they see piles of junk.”

Pete Suarez: “Even if their backyards looked like Sanford and Son, I wouldn’t get distracted.”

On April 20, some IB residents that live on 7th Street received a letter from the city of Imperial Beach that said they had to clean up their backyards in 30 days, or be fined.

“We thought that there would never be anything behind our home since its a bird estuary,” said Kelly Leiker. “There was never a trail before a few months ago.”

Leiker received one of the “Notice of intent to enforce minimum standards for properties” letters from the city. Her mother’s owned the house on 7th Street since 1977, but since then, Leiker has taken over, and in the last year, she and her husband invested $130,000 to fix it up.

Residents will be “assessed a fine of not less than $100.00.”

“We have an infant and a preschooler that deserve our attention after work,” she said, “and my husband has slowly been fixing up the yard for us to enjoy come summer. I’m not sure if our yard is in compliance or not and we have yet to fix any questionable characteristics of our backyard.”

On the letter it reads in part “Please review the condition of the rear yard area of your property. If any of the conditions below are present, please correct the violations within 30 days of this notice.”

“Our yard isn’t a junkyard,” Leiker said, “not for the tourists, not for the visitors; but for ourselves and for our children.”

Leiker then sent me photos of their backyard. The two potential violations she’s concerned about are:

“Trash, debris, construction materials, etc. are prohibited from accumulating on the property" and

"Overgrown or dead vegetation on property, including sidewalks, curbs, gutters, and parkways is prohibited from accumulating on the property.”

They have a ladder lying by their fence; bags of soil, empty planters, and tools around their picnic table; and weeds growing by their blue shed. Leiker admitted, "There are stacks of pavers and a few construction type materials that we are using to fix up our yard.”

Jerry, a cyclist and mechanic, rides his Trek 5200 to Coronado. He parks his car and starts at the J Street Marina, passes the salt works on the frontage road by I-5, then crosses the new bike path behind Leiker’s house. “The rule of no parking and storage of vehicles in the backyard is f’ed-up,” he said, “I feel bad for the gear heads that can’t wrench without constantly looking over their shoulders.”

“Who judges what’s acceptable or not?” questioned Jerry.

Inspections of 7th Street backyards, between the 300-500 blocks, will be conducted on or after May 20, and if the property fails to meet minimum standards, the residents will be “assessed a fine of not less than $100.00.”

“So what does that mean,” Suarez said, “will they have to pay $100 per infraction …. I don’t think they (the city reps) can do that.”

Leiker’s not taking the letter lightly. She posted her sentiments on social media. “Shame on the city for giving us 30 days to finish a project,” she said. “The point is, 30 days isn’t much in the busy lives of working folks with young children, sick family, sports events. and social responsibilities …. whatever.”

Other neighbors chimed in and forewarned the 7th Street residents that their code compliance officers mean business.

Claudio is from Imperial Beach, but he and his family live over by Florence Street, less than a mile southeast from Leiker.

“We are up to $8,000 in fines over things we can’t afford to take care of,” said Claudio. “She (the code compliance officer) forced her way in our yard and took pictures. Even though our gate’s locked, she keeps coming back giving us more fines. They are fining us for overgrown vegetation that doesn’t exist anymore, rodents, sheds that have been on the property for 20 years, our fences and few other things. It’s like seven pages of citations.”

Leiker said that the city added a rod iron fence and plants to separate the new bike path from their backyards. “I’m not sure how long bougainvillea and the other plants they planted take to create enough cover for privacy,” she said, “but it will take longer than 30 days.”

“If they (the city) knew they were going to build a bike path for us [cyclists] a long time ago,” Suarez said, “why didn’t they warn the residents when the construction began.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Super Girl Surf Pro, John Legend

Events September 19-September 22, 2021
Next Article

San Diego City Clerk attacked in re-tweet

VA San Diego doctors accidentally overpaid?
Comments
1

If the city (or PUD or condo association, etc.) has a rule that they wish to enforce that enforcement must be fair, consistent and applicable to all. If IB wishes to enforce "minimum standards" to some residents they must apply those standards to ALL residents. Selective enforcement is discriminatory and should be challenged. Of course it is IB what can you expect.

May 1, 2018

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close