4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Doug Liman on The Wall

The sniper is so far away that you’ll be dead before you hear the gunshot

The Wall: Psychological warfare in the desert between a sniper and his target.
The Wall: Psychological warfare in the desert between a sniper and his target.

Doug Liman’s The Wall pits two American soldiers (John Cena and Aaron Taylor-Johnson, the latter looking like Jake Gyllenhaal and talking like Casey Affleck and acquitting himself admirably) against an Iraqi sniper in the pipelined, post-war wasteland.

The sniper has the clear advantage: they don’t know where he is, and their only cover is the crumbling stone wall of a former schoolhouse. But before he blows their brains out, he wants to get inside their heads, so he commandeers their communications and strikes up a conversation. Where are you from? Why are you here? etc. Taylor-Johnson plays along, hoping to buy the time necessary to rescue his unconscious and bleeding friend, tend to his own wounds, radio for help, and, somehow, locate and engage his adversary — who naturally has plans of his own.

Their talk is like the desert wind: rising up and falling still, obscuring and clarifying, eddying and sweeping. Their conflicts are several: training vs. technology, resource vs. rage, and finally, guilt vs. revenge. Liman does good work in making the disembodied voice into a man, and in fitting a dialogue-heavy drama into the framework of an action film where the action is minimal but definitely not minor.

Movie

Wall **

thumbnail

Doug Liman’s small-scale war movie pits two American soldiers (John Cena and Aaron Taylor-Johnson, the latter looking like Jake Gyllenhaal and talking like Casey Affleck and acquitting himself admirably) against an Iraqi sniper in the pipelined, post-war wasteland. The sniper has the clear advantage: they don’t know where he is, and their only cover is the crumbling stone wall of a former schoolhouse. But before he blows their brains out, he wants to get inside their heads, so he commandeers their communications and strikes up a conversation. <em>Where are you from? Why are you here?</em> Etc.Taylor-Johnson plays along, hoping to buy the time necessary to rescue his unconscious and bleeding friend, tend to his own wounds, radio for help, and, somehow, locate and engage his adversary — who naturally has plans of his own. Their talk is like the desert wind: rising up and falling still, obscuring and clarifying, eddying and sweeping. Their conflicts are several: training vs. technology, resource vs. rage, and finally, guilt vs. revenge. Liman does good work in making the disembodied voice into a man, and in fitting a dialogue-heavy drama into the framework of an action film where the action is minimal but definitely not minor.

Find showtimes

Matthew Lickona: The title card for the film has “The Wall” in Arabic and English. Could you talk about the decision to include the Arabic?

Doug Liman: It’s not a political movie. It doesn’t question the war, because you’re in a war, and when you’re in a war, you don’t have the luxury of questioning it. But I wanted people to think a little bit about both sides of the wall, to think about who it is you’re fighting. I’ve always prided myself on my villains not being villainous, but being rational and logical. My villains are the heroes of their own stories. When Chris Cooper is hunting Jason Bourne in The Bourne Identity, he has a very good reason for wanting to kill him. The more you understand that your opponent has a reason for fighting, the stronger an opponent they become. If your opponent has a good argument, they’re way worse as opponents than someone who has no good argument.

ML: Along those lines of rational and logical — part of what makes the sniper so terrifying is how cultured and even gentlemanly he is. And even when he threatens violence, he does it to get something he wants. But then he has that one outburst of raw barbarism, where he tells Isaac that his face will be cut off and his tongue stapled to his chest...

DL: They’re not friends. They’re talking, but if Isaac can’t kill the sniper Juba, then the sniper is going to kill him. That’s the cold, hard reality of war. Juba is pissed off. He hates the Americans, and he feels he’s right for hating the Americans, and he’s going to take it out on Isaac. When he says that, he’s acting like a human being with feelings; not everything he does is consistent with everything else. He’s letting his guard down a little bit.

ML: The conversation has a real ebb and flow; at times, it seems intimate enough to be almost friendly, and then, as you note, the anger comes out. Talk about working to establish that rhythm.

DL: I tried to think of it as a bit like music, where you build to crescendos and you can have little interludes. That was the most challenging thing for me as a filmmaker: to start with a story that was basically a 90-page scene and break it down. To have things we’re building towards and then moments of quiet from which to start building up again.

ML: Was that challenge what attracted you to the project?

DL: I like making action movies because I like seeing how characters deal with the adverse situations that action movies create. The Wall puts its characters in an outrageous situation, but it’s so elegantly grounded. That’s what drew me to it: these soldiers trying to survive an impossible situation, with a sniper so far away that you’ll be dead for three seconds before you hear the gunshot.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Mayor says planned handover of Balboa Park’s United States cottage to Afghanistan was “bound to be chaotic.”

Gloria’s shame?
Next Article

The massive, small molcajete at La Sinaloense

How regionally inspired mariscos fill a restaurant patio in La Presa
The Wall: Psychological warfare in the desert between a sniper and his target.
The Wall: Psychological warfare in the desert between a sniper and his target.

Doug Liman’s The Wall pits two American soldiers (John Cena and Aaron Taylor-Johnson, the latter looking like Jake Gyllenhaal and talking like Casey Affleck and acquitting himself admirably) against an Iraqi sniper in the pipelined, post-war wasteland.

The sniper has the clear advantage: they don’t know where he is, and their only cover is the crumbling stone wall of a former schoolhouse. But before he blows their brains out, he wants to get inside their heads, so he commandeers their communications and strikes up a conversation. Where are you from? Why are you here? etc. Taylor-Johnson plays along, hoping to buy the time necessary to rescue his unconscious and bleeding friend, tend to his own wounds, radio for help, and, somehow, locate and engage his adversary — who naturally has plans of his own.

Their talk is like the desert wind: rising up and falling still, obscuring and clarifying, eddying and sweeping. Their conflicts are several: training vs. technology, resource vs. rage, and finally, guilt vs. revenge. Liman does good work in making the disembodied voice into a man, and in fitting a dialogue-heavy drama into the framework of an action film where the action is minimal but definitely not minor.

Movie

Wall **

thumbnail

Doug Liman’s small-scale war movie pits two American soldiers (John Cena and Aaron Taylor-Johnson, the latter looking like Jake Gyllenhaal and talking like Casey Affleck and acquitting himself admirably) against an Iraqi sniper in the pipelined, post-war wasteland. The sniper has the clear advantage: they don’t know where he is, and their only cover is the crumbling stone wall of a former schoolhouse. But before he blows their brains out, he wants to get inside their heads, so he commandeers their communications and strikes up a conversation. <em>Where are you from? Why are you here?</em> Etc.Taylor-Johnson plays along, hoping to buy the time necessary to rescue his unconscious and bleeding friend, tend to his own wounds, radio for help, and, somehow, locate and engage his adversary — who naturally has plans of his own. Their talk is like the desert wind: rising up and falling still, obscuring and clarifying, eddying and sweeping. Their conflicts are several: training vs. technology, resource vs. rage, and finally, guilt vs. revenge. Liman does good work in making the disembodied voice into a man, and in fitting a dialogue-heavy drama into the framework of an action film where the action is minimal but definitely not minor.

Find showtimes

Matthew Lickona: The title card for the film has “The Wall” in Arabic and English. Could you talk about the decision to include the Arabic?

Doug Liman: It’s not a political movie. It doesn’t question the war, because you’re in a war, and when you’re in a war, you don’t have the luxury of questioning it. But I wanted people to think a little bit about both sides of the wall, to think about who it is you’re fighting. I’ve always prided myself on my villains not being villainous, but being rational and logical. My villains are the heroes of their own stories. When Chris Cooper is hunting Jason Bourne in The Bourne Identity, he has a very good reason for wanting to kill him. The more you understand that your opponent has a reason for fighting, the stronger an opponent they become. If your opponent has a good argument, they’re way worse as opponents than someone who has no good argument.

ML: Along those lines of rational and logical — part of what makes the sniper so terrifying is how cultured and even gentlemanly he is. And even when he threatens violence, he does it to get something he wants. But then he has that one outburst of raw barbarism, where he tells Isaac that his face will be cut off and his tongue stapled to his chest...

DL: They’re not friends. They’re talking, but if Isaac can’t kill the sniper Juba, then the sniper is going to kill him. That’s the cold, hard reality of war. Juba is pissed off. He hates the Americans, and he feels he’s right for hating the Americans, and he’s going to take it out on Isaac. When he says that, he’s acting like a human being with feelings; not everything he does is consistent with everything else. He’s letting his guard down a little bit.

ML: The conversation has a real ebb and flow; at times, it seems intimate enough to be almost friendly, and then, as you note, the anger comes out. Talk about working to establish that rhythm.

DL: I tried to think of it as a bit like music, where you build to crescendos and you can have little interludes. That was the most challenging thing for me as a filmmaker: to start with a story that was basically a 90-page scene and break it down. To have things we’re building towards and then moments of quiet from which to start building up again.

ML: Was that challenge what attracted you to the project?

DL: I like making action movies because I like seeing how characters deal with the adverse situations that action movies create. The Wall puts its characters in an outrageous situation, but it’s so elegantly grounded. That’s what drew me to it: these soldiers trying to survive an impossible situation, with a sniper so far away that you’ll be dead for three seconds before you hear the gunshot.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

The ugly war housing of Midway-Rosecrans, San Diego's Japanese imprisoned in Poston, Arizona

Douglas Hotel as center of black culture, Pt. Loma's lost cannons, U-T wanted Japanese out of San Diego, the busy gas station at Bacon and Cable
Next Article

It’s Time to Get Buggy

Lobster Season Opener Saturday
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close