Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Time to eat crow

A touch of magic tingles in the air when Hadelich plays

The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania by Joseph Noel Paton
The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania by Joseph Noel Paton

Every now and again it is important to eat some crow and I had an appetite for it after the Mainly Mozart concert on Thursday, June 22. Previously I had said I could go the rest of my life without hearing another Mozart violin concerto. I was wrong.

If Augustin Hadelich is playing a Mozart violin concerto with the Mainly Mozart Festival orchestra and Michael Francis is conducting then I’m all ears. They played Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 4.

Allow me to map the Mozart violin concerto as it has occurred in San Diego over the past few weeks. On May 20 we got Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 3 at the San Diego Symphony as conducted by Charles Dutoit and played by Simone Porter. Thursday, June 15, we got Violin Concerto No. 5 performed by Cleveland Orchestra concertmaster William Preucil and now Hadelich on the fourth. I don’t know that we’re going to find a better stretch of Mozart violin concertos anywhere at anytime.

Video:

Ye spotted snakes

Hadelich is a star. It is impossible to explain but plain to see. A touch of magic tingles in the air when he plays. His emotional connection to the music is undeniable whether it be Mozart or Samuel Barber at the San Diego Symphony.

Once upon a time I was young and spent my leisure hours haunting the “cutouts” section at a long forgotten temple named Tower Records. One day there was a CD of Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s Dream Incidental Music. I risked the $2.99—no returns on cutouts — and was instantly mesmerized.

I bring up my Midsummer Night’s story because I got the feeling on Thursday that most of the audience was familiar with the overture and the wedding march but not the rest, and the rest is glorious. Is there anything more lovely then Ye spotted snakes?

Mendelssohn wrote the overture as a standalone piece when he was 17 years-old. He receives much deserved credit for producing a masterpiece at an early age, but let’s not forget about big sister Fanny. There is no doubt that Fanny guided the young Felix in his musical development before fading into domestic life while Felix became a knight in the War of the Romantics.

Fifteen years later Mendelssohn was commissioned to compose incidental music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The music was designed to accompany the play in the same style as a motion picture score does nowadays. However, the music wasn’t intended to start until the second act.

The Mainly Mozart Festival put on a theatrical-ish performance with a narrator, Eva Barnes, and the solo female soloists, soprano Sharleen Joynt and mezzo soprano Julia Di Fiore, acting out various roles.

If Eva Barnes had been “off book” the evening would have been even more effective. Sharleen Joynt’s singing was ideally suited to the soprano fairy role. Mezzo soprano Julia Di Fiore was not given much by Mendelssohn to sing outside the ensemble.

Patterned lights were projected onto the walls and ceiling of the theater while paintings and images based on Shakespeare’s masterpiece were shown on a screen behind the orchestra.

The overwhelming sentiment of both the music and images was one of beauty. I was struck by the effort of the artists to produce the most beautiful scenes from the drama and Mendelssohn’s unflagging ability to pull a stream of gorgeous tones from the orchestra.

As an aside, every time I hear the woodwind chords, which begin the overture and show up again in the finale, I expect Scheherazade to follow.

Just before the conclusion of A Midsummer Night’s Dream there is a descending phrase in the strings. Never in your life will you experience a more poignant musical moment.

It was almost too much to handle. The conspiracy of the projections, the women’s chorus, the soloists, the narrator, and the orchestra had opened a passage directly to the Athenian woods of hallowed antiquity.

I felt the convoluted gaggle of thoughts and emotions which I consider to be myself begin to dissolve. The evening was an authentic mystical event beyond the lofty expectations which I already place upon the festival.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Björk Live from Reykjavik, Zoonotic Diseases of Marine Mammals

Events August 8-August 12, 2020
Next Article

Bay Books Cafe: cook the books

It’s an artistic mix of egg, pepper, red onion, queso fresco, radish slices, and avo.
The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania by Joseph Noel Paton
The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania by Joseph Noel Paton

Every now and again it is important to eat some crow and I had an appetite for it after the Mainly Mozart concert on Thursday, June 22. Previously I had said I could go the rest of my life without hearing another Mozart violin concerto. I was wrong.

If Augustin Hadelich is playing a Mozart violin concerto with the Mainly Mozart Festival orchestra and Michael Francis is conducting then I’m all ears. They played Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 4.

Allow me to map the Mozart violin concerto as it has occurred in San Diego over the past few weeks. On May 20 we got Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 3 at the San Diego Symphony as conducted by Charles Dutoit and played by Simone Porter. Thursday, June 15, we got Violin Concerto No. 5 performed by Cleveland Orchestra concertmaster William Preucil and now Hadelich on the fourth. I don’t know that we’re going to find a better stretch of Mozart violin concertos anywhere at anytime.

Video:

Ye spotted snakes

Hadelich is a star. It is impossible to explain but plain to see. A touch of magic tingles in the air when he plays. His emotional connection to the music is undeniable whether it be Mozart or Samuel Barber at the San Diego Symphony.

Once upon a time I was young and spent my leisure hours haunting the “cutouts” section at a long forgotten temple named Tower Records. One day there was a CD of Mendelssohn’s Midsummer Night’s Dream Incidental Music. I risked the $2.99—no returns on cutouts — and was instantly mesmerized.

I bring up my Midsummer Night’s story because I got the feeling on Thursday that most of the audience was familiar with the overture and the wedding march but not the rest, and the rest is glorious. Is there anything more lovely then Ye spotted snakes?

Mendelssohn wrote the overture as a standalone piece when he was 17 years-old. He receives much deserved credit for producing a masterpiece at an early age, but let’s not forget about big sister Fanny. There is no doubt that Fanny guided the young Felix in his musical development before fading into domestic life while Felix became a knight in the War of the Romantics.

Fifteen years later Mendelssohn was commissioned to compose incidental music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The music was designed to accompany the play in the same style as a motion picture score does nowadays. However, the music wasn’t intended to start until the second act.

The Mainly Mozart Festival put on a theatrical-ish performance with a narrator, Eva Barnes, and the solo female soloists, soprano Sharleen Joynt and mezzo soprano Julia Di Fiore, acting out various roles.

If Eva Barnes had been “off book” the evening would have been even more effective. Sharleen Joynt’s singing was ideally suited to the soprano fairy role. Mezzo soprano Julia Di Fiore was not given much by Mendelssohn to sing outside the ensemble.

Patterned lights were projected onto the walls and ceiling of the theater while paintings and images based on Shakespeare’s masterpiece were shown on a screen behind the orchestra.

The overwhelming sentiment of both the music and images was one of beauty. I was struck by the effort of the artists to produce the most beautiful scenes from the drama and Mendelssohn’s unflagging ability to pull a stream of gorgeous tones from the orchestra.

As an aside, every time I hear the woodwind chords, which begin the overture and show up again in the finale, I expect Scheherazade to follow.

Just before the conclusion of A Midsummer Night’s Dream there is a descending phrase in the strings. Never in your life will you experience a more poignant musical moment.

It was almost too much to handle. The conspiracy of the projections, the women’s chorus, the soloists, the narrator, and the orchestra had opened a passage directly to the Athenian woods of hallowed antiquity.

I felt the convoluted gaggle of thoughts and emotions which I consider to be myself begin to dissolve. The evening was an authentic mystical event beyond the lofty expectations which I already place upon the festival.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Death, destruction and rebuilding in La Mesa

“I don’t feel the pull of pure chaos myself, because I’ve worked to build a life.”
Next Article

San Diego inside sports

El Cajon Speedway, dark side of NFL, pick-up b-ball, Lakeside's Jarrod Boswell, start of Padres, SDSU football scandal
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close