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$800K signs mounted at City College

Proposition N brightens up 16th Street and B and C

LED lights are used to illuminate signs large enough so students, faculty and visitors can see them from afar.
LED lights are used to illuminate signs large enough so students, faculty and visitors can see them from afar.

Many of the cosmetology students at City College were impressed with the new signage being installed on their Career Technology building.

"There are 16 signs; the cost per sign is about $51,469.”

“OMG, $50,000 per sign?” Corinne said, ” I saw them installing it the day before, but they never finished this one.”

"They want to modernize the campus even more."

On July 18, Corinne and her classmates walked across 16th Street to the Math and Science Building to get some snacks. “I thought the [previous] signs got people where they needed to be, and there are things that we are lacking in our school,” she said, “like [a bigger] janitorial staff, which would also give more jobs.”

The new signs are made of a steel framing with aluminum bodies, and then paired with acrylic.

The total cost of construction for the new campus signs is $823,500.

“That cost includes materials and fabrication of the signs,” said Tom Fine, “as well as the costs for labor, equipment and permitting to install them. Because the signs are typically installed at the tops of the buildings, the contractor is required to position lifting equipment (cranes) within the public right of way to make the installations. As such, they are required to obtain city approval and permits to close traffic lanes and sidewalks.”

Fine is the City College Campus project manager. “This project is funded under the Prop N — City College Infrastructure project,” he said, “there are 16 signs, so the total cost per sign is about $51,469.”

Voter-approved Proposition N was an $870 million construction bond program that passed in 2006 to help transform the San Diego Community College campuses.

“They could’ve bought a lot of new computers with that money,” said Juan Carlos Jimenez Cruz, who is taking six units this summer to complete his urban studies degree. “Even if the price is kinda high I understand what they are trying to do — they are blending in with the times and they want to modernize the campus even more to compete with the other colleges,” he said.

The new signs are made of a steel framing with aluminum bodies, and then paired with acrylic to create the red-and-white translucent lettering. LED (light-emitting diode) lights are used to illuminate the 20′ X 5′ signs which need to be large enough so the students, faculty and visitors can see them from afar. LEDs were said by Fine to be 80 percent more efficient than the standard, incandescent lighting.

“It doesn’t hurt that ‘AH’ are my initials,” said Alan Hickey, a photography major, “so who doesn’t like seeing their name in [the] lights.” He was referring to the new Arts and Humanities building sign mounted atop the building where he has photographed for his school newspaper and magazine. Hickey said that he capitalizes on the urban landscape of the campus (to utilize as a backdrop), and more so on the various light sources emitting from the buildings, stairways and the newly installed signs.

Fine said that a few more signs will be installed on campus in the near future: the Science building monument sign at 16th and B Streets, the Math and Social Sciences monument sign at 16th and C Streets, the Career Technology building sign on top of the building on 16th Street and the Career Technology monument sign at 16th and C Streets.

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LED lights are used to illuminate signs large enough so students, faculty and visitors can see them from afar.
LED lights are used to illuminate signs large enough so students, faculty and visitors can see them from afar.

Many of the cosmetology students at City College were impressed with the new signage being installed on their Career Technology building.

"There are 16 signs; the cost per sign is about $51,469.”

“OMG, $50,000 per sign?” Corinne said, ” I saw them installing it the day before, but they never finished this one.”

"They want to modernize the campus even more."

On July 18, Corinne and her classmates walked across 16th Street to the Math and Science Building to get some snacks. “I thought the [previous] signs got people where they needed to be, and there are things that we are lacking in our school,” she said, “like [a bigger] janitorial staff, which would also give more jobs.”

The new signs are made of a steel framing with aluminum bodies, and then paired with acrylic.

The total cost of construction for the new campus signs is $823,500.

“That cost includes materials and fabrication of the signs,” said Tom Fine, “as well as the costs for labor, equipment and permitting to install them. Because the signs are typically installed at the tops of the buildings, the contractor is required to position lifting equipment (cranes) within the public right of way to make the installations. As such, they are required to obtain city approval and permits to close traffic lanes and sidewalks.”

Fine is the City College Campus project manager. “This project is funded under the Prop N — City College Infrastructure project,” he said, “there are 16 signs, so the total cost per sign is about $51,469.”

Voter-approved Proposition N was an $870 million construction bond program that passed in 2006 to help transform the San Diego Community College campuses.

“They could’ve bought a lot of new computers with that money,” said Juan Carlos Jimenez Cruz, who is taking six units this summer to complete his urban studies degree. “Even if the price is kinda high I understand what they are trying to do — they are blending in with the times and they want to modernize the campus even more to compete with the other colleges,” he said.

The new signs are made of a steel framing with aluminum bodies, and then paired with acrylic to create the red-and-white translucent lettering. LED (light-emitting diode) lights are used to illuminate the 20′ X 5′ signs which need to be large enough so the students, faculty and visitors can see them from afar. LEDs were said by Fine to be 80 percent more efficient than the standard, incandescent lighting.

“It doesn’t hurt that ‘AH’ are my initials,” said Alan Hickey, a photography major, “so who doesn’t like seeing their name in [the] lights.” He was referring to the new Arts and Humanities building sign mounted atop the building where he has photographed for his school newspaper and magazine. Hickey said that he capitalizes on the urban landscape of the campus (to utilize as a backdrop), and more so on the various light sources emitting from the buildings, stairways and the newly installed signs.

Fine said that a few more signs will be installed on campus in the near future: the Science building monument sign at 16th and B Streets, the Math and Social Sciences monument sign at 16th and C Streets, the Career Technology building sign on top of the building on 16th Street and the Career Technology monument sign at 16th and C Streets.

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Comments
5

How many of those who voted for the bond issue thought that signs would take almost $1 million of the proceeds? How many of those who voted for it even care? No, this smacks of fancying up the campus with some very costly, very visible signs, to impress somebody. It shouldn't impress the students who know all about the education they are getting there from a staff of freeway flyer instructors who are underpaid and unappreciated. Only the administrators, and the top ones at that, are getting anything out of this outlay. Many other things that directly affect the educational mission could have used those funds. And I'll bet that some perfectly visible and legible signs could have been procured for around 10% of the cost of these.

July 20, 2017

want to bet the contractor has "connections" ?

July 21, 2017

That must really be excellent quality steel that goes into those frames. And the aluminum has got to be top of the line. You through in that acrylic and the LED's with the wiring and hell, its easy to see how one of these signs would cost more than a brand new Lexus. Sure, the Lexus has the air conditioning, and that whole electrical system and then there's things like the drive train, the transmission, engine, suspension system, ABS brakes, the leather interior, the sound system, interior lighting, and lets not forget that neat little navigation screen with the gps. Oh, yea, you can see how those signs and the Lexus are practically the same thing. Of course, the signs do cost a tad more than the Lexus, buy hey, LED's last a long time. So, the only thing the college needs to do now is put up one more sign; a great big one...that says SUCKERS.

July 20, 2017

they figured ( hoped) they would slide this past anyone that may see the expenditure ( wanted money)

July 21, 2017

( wasted money)

July 22, 2017

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