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Pallamary. His seat was right below the area reserved for people with mobility impairments.

Pallamary. His seat was right below the area reserved for people with mobility impairments.

Michael J. Pallamary, land use consultant and local political activist, filed a suit in Superior Court July 5 complaining that he was a victim of mistreatment at a Chargers game November 6 of last year. Among other woes, according to the suit, he suffers from diabetes, osteoarthritis in both knees, a torn meniscus in both legs, a blood clot in in his left leg, and spinal problems.

His seat was right below the area reserved for people with mobility impairments. During the second half, he suffered a muscle spasm that tossed his leg up and doubled him over in pain, according to the suit. He sat down in the disabled section, but, he says, was ordered back to his seat. He was told he couldn't stand against the back wall. The police came and escorted him out, ignoring his complaints. Then the Qualcomm medical staff treated him cavalierly, refusing him ambulance usage and pain medicine, according to the suit.

He is suing Elite Show Services, the police, the city, Qualcomm Stadium medical staff, certain individuals, and the Chargers Football Company, which remains in San Diego even though the team has moved to Los Angeles. Pallamary is suing for violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, negligent affliction of emotional distress, false arrest, battery, and false imprisonment, among other things.

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Comments

AlexClarke July 9, 2017 @ 10:19 a.m.

Gold digger. If he is as bad off as he claims he would be well advised to contact a local mortuary.

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Don Bauder July 9, 2017 @ 12:32 p.m.

AlexClarke: He has been pretty active for a man with that many physical woes, but I can't argue with his claims. Best, Don Bauder

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JustWondering July 10, 2017 @ 10:48 a.m.

How would a person such as Pallamary, with all of his alleged ailments, reasonably expect to enjoy a football game in a stadium as old as QUALCOMM? He admits to the onset of this incident being his own body revolting against the cramped seating and close quarters nature of stadium seating. However, we don't have any indication from him regarding the levels of drugs or alcohol in his system in his complaint.

My experience in observing people who interact with authorities is: most cooperate. Those who don't typically fall into two categories:

  1. Those who are drunk or at a minimum under the influence and thus impaired from making good judgements.
  2. Those who resent authority and or believe they are entitled to special treatment.

I believe Pallamary's game ticket authorized his use of his assigned seat, not other ones. In addition, the Charger's and NFL Code of Fan Conduct prohibits behaviors demonstrated by Pallamary. Link to NFL Code of Fan Conduct

Finally, it is a sad commentary on the state of our culture when plaintiffs endlessly believe the taxpayers should compensate them for their unreasonable acts.

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Don Bauder July 10, 2017 @ 12:44 p.m.

JustWondering: I believe that a person who gets cramps during a game should be able to occupy a handicapped seat, particularly when it is empty and just a few feet away from him. If he is going to continue following the Chargers, he should get seating in the handicapped section. Ditto for Padres games. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 10, 2017 @ 12:45 p.m.

Mike Murphy: That's what some say. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 10, 2017 @ 12:47 p.m.

Mike Murphy: I don't see this as an ADA-type scam. ADA seamsters have multiple victims. He is the only victim allegedly, but he does file suit against a number of defendants. Best, Don Bauder

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JustWondering July 11, 2017 @ 9:34 a.m.

Or maybe the court will classify him as a vexatious litigant in this matter. Litigation like this seems motivated by anger and retribution for the incident which was caused, in my opinion, by his own acts. People like this rarely accept responsibility for their own actions and believe they are entitled.

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Don Bauder July 11, 2017 @ 2:40 p.m.

JustWondering: A vexatious litigant generally has to file multiple suits, as far as I know, and they are likely to be dubious. But I can't swear by that. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 10, 2017 @ 2:55 p.m.

Murphyjunk: Maybe he will amend the suit and name more defendants. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh July 11, 2017 @ 7:57 a.m.

Some common sense here would have avoided grief. If I felt that lousy at a game, I'd get up, leave the facility, and go home.

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JustWondering July 11, 2017 @ 9:35 a.m.

Amen! If only more people used common sense we all would be better off.

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Don Bauder July 11, 2017 @ 10:33 a.m.

Visduh: Or should a diabetic in distress go to a pro football game? Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 11, 2017 @ 10:33 a.m.

JustWondering: Why is it that common sense is so uncommon? Best, Don Bauder

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JustWondering July 11, 2017 @ 6:50 p.m.

The reasons are a vast space, and the vastness of "empty space between the ears" is typical of those who don't use common sense.

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Don Bauder July 12, 2017 @ 7:19 a.m.

JustWondering: Will some judge make that declaration? Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi July 11, 2017 @ 12:55 p.m.

I looked at the Superior Court records and he has quite a history as a plaintiff, particularly small claims.

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Don Bauder July 11, 2017 @ 2:45 p.m.

Ponzi: I was just told yesterday by a gentleman in another state that small claims court pays little to no attention to the vexatious litigant classification. I do not know if that is true in California. Best, Don Bauder

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