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Now the builders are mad at Encinitas

They fear the worst — total ban on new construction

As long as Encinitas residents keep voting against affordable housing, the city will remain out of compliance. - Image by Encinitas Coast Life
As long as Encinitas residents keep voting against affordable housing, the city will remain out of compliance.

After nearly 25 years of non-compliance with state law requiring municipalities to provide space to develop affordable housing, the city of Encinitas is headed back to court.

According to a petition filed to San Diego County Superior Court by the trade group Building Industry Association of San Diego this week, Encinitas hasn't updated its housing element, the background policy that drives housing development, since 1992. The existing policy, by the city's own admission in 2013, is on track to meet only one-third of the city's need for housing to low- and very-low-income residents.

In 2015, the association agreed to a settlement with the city, whereby Encinitas would develop and implement a plan to address affordable housing needs through 2021. The resulting plan, At Home In Encinitas, was put to voters on the November 2016 ballot per the city's mandate of voter approval for such plan updates. It failed to pass, with voters defeating the measure by a ten percent margin.

Encinitas is the only city in the county that doesn't have an up-to-date affordable housing plan in place.

Following the defeat, the city council in February appointed a new task force to develop a plan that might be more palatable to local voters. Builders, however, say that such posturing amounts to a stall tactic that will be stymied by residents opposed to any new development whatsoever within city limits.

The association cites a presentation at that February meeting by a group called Committee for a Better Plan as particularly troubling.

"The [committee] presentation began and ended with quotations from [California Housing & Community Development] deputy director Glen Campora at a December 2015 Housing Forum, wherein he purportedly stated that his group has never instituted a lawsuit against a city for failing to adopt a housing element, and that lawsuits are instead brought by housing advocates and builders, resulting in courts halting the issuance of any building permits until a community adopts a compliant housing element," notes the association's court petition

"The opinions and approach expressed in [the committee presentation] are a crystallization of the problem in the city of Encinitas: the city and Committee for a Better Plan are committed to the idea that state Housing Element law must bend to the will of the voters in Encinitas, and the harshest penalty available to those seeking compliance with state law is the cessation of all building activity in the city. Such a sanction would be welcomed by those city leaders and residents who not only oppose the adoption of a housing element complaint with state Housing Element Law and/or fair housing laws, but all new building activity in the city."

Essentially, the trade group argues, as long as Encinitas residents keep voting against affordable housing, the city will remain out of compliance with state housing laws.

"If residents of certain cities were permitted to vote, through an initiative or other process, to exempt themselves from the requirements of state housing law, the structure established by the state legislature would cease to function," the association argues.

Instead of asking for the court to halt all new construction, which the petition implies may be the unstated goal behind continued foot-dragging, builders are asking for a writ of mandate compelling the city to move forward with its At Home in Encinitas plan, submitting for approval to Housing & Community Development and the California Coastal Commission. Further, the group demands that future plan updates (another is due in 2021) be exempted from city provisions requiring voter approval prior to implementation.

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As long as Encinitas residents keep voting against affordable housing, the city will remain out of compliance. - Image by Encinitas Coast Life
As long as Encinitas residents keep voting against affordable housing, the city will remain out of compliance.

After nearly 25 years of non-compliance with state law requiring municipalities to provide space to develop affordable housing, the city of Encinitas is headed back to court.

According to a petition filed to San Diego County Superior Court by the trade group Building Industry Association of San Diego this week, Encinitas hasn't updated its housing element, the background policy that drives housing development, since 1992. The existing policy, by the city's own admission in 2013, is on track to meet only one-third of the city's need for housing to low- and very-low-income residents.

In 2015, the association agreed to a settlement with the city, whereby Encinitas would develop and implement a plan to address affordable housing needs through 2021. The resulting plan, At Home In Encinitas, was put to voters on the November 2016 ballot per the city's mandate of voter approval for such plan updates. It failed to pass, with voters defeating the measure by a ten percent margin.

Encinitas is the only city in the county that doesn't have an up-to-date affordable housing plan in place.

Following the defeat, the city council in February appointed a new task force to develop a plan that might be more palatable to local voters. Builders, however, say that such posturing amounts to a stall tactic that will be stymied by residents opposed to any new development whatsoever within city limits.

The association cites a presentation at that February meeting by a group called Committee for a Better Plan as particularly troubling.

"The [committee] presentation began and ended with quotations from [California Housing & Community Development] deputy director Glen Campora at a December 2015 Housing Forum, wherein he purportedly stated that his group has never instituted a lawsuit against a city for failing to adopt a housing element, and that lawsuits are instead brought by housing advocates and builders, resulting in courts halting the issuance of any building permits until a community adopts a compliant housing element," notes the association's court petition

"The opinions and approach expressed in [the committee presentation] are a crystallization of the problem in the city of Encinitas: the city and Committee for a Better Plan are committed to the idea that state Housing Element law must bend to the will of the voters in Encinitas, and the harshest penalty available to those seeking compliance with state law is the cessation of all building activity in the city. Such a sanction would be welcomed by those city leaders and residents who not only oppose the adoption of a housing element complaint with state Housing Element Law and/or fair housing laws, but all new building activity in the city."

Essentially, the trade group argues, as long as Encinitas residents keep voting against affordable housing, the city will remain out of compliance with state housing laws.

"If residents of certain cities were permitted to vote, through an initiative or other process, to exempt themselves from the requirements of state housing law, the structure established by the state legislature would cease to function," the association argues.

Instead of asking for the court to halt all new construction, which the petition implies may be the unstated goal behind continued foot-dragging, builders are asking for a writ of mandate compelling the city to move forward with its At Home in Encinitas plan, submitting for approval to Housing & Community Development and the California Coastal Commission. Further, the group demands that future plan updates (another is due in 2021) be exempted from city provisions requiring voter approval prior to implementation.

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Comments
3

"If residents of certain cities were permitted to vote, through an initiative or other process, to exempt themselves from the requirements of state housing law, the structure established by the state legislature would cease to function" I say, God bless the citizens of Encinitas.

Both houses of the state legislature are a mess and should be dissolved. One political party holding a super majority is not representative of ALL the people no matter which party. Local communities SHOULD control their own land use regulations, not the edicts from Sacramento.

July 2, 2017

In San Diego County there is no such thing as affordable housing. The rent for a one bedroom apartment in the communities that you would not want to live in average over a thousand dollars a month. A Walmart worker averages $11. after paying for a low end dump they are left with $803 to pay for utilities, food, transportation, clothes, medical co-pays and taxes. The only affordable housing is income based HUD housing. No community can build enough HUD housing to keep up with the number of low wage low/no benefit workers in San Diego County.

July 2, 2017

It's the economics, stupid.

July 3, 2017

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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